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Willie Banks

Photo of Willie Banks

Inducted: 1999, athlete

Born: March 11, 1956 - Travis Air Force Base, California

Events
Triple Jump - 17.97 m


One of the greatest triple jumpers ever produced by the United States, Willie Banks had his best moment on June 16, 1985 when he set a world record of 58' 11 1/2" at the national championships in Indianapolis, Ind. That was the highlight of a career that started in Oceanside, Calif. After graduating from high school, Banks attended UCLA and was twice runner-up in the NCAA Championships. It was after college that he achieved his greatest success, setting his first American record in 1981 by jumping 56' 7 3/4" and improving that record six more times -- by more than 2 feet -- before he was through. A four-time AAU champion, Banks represented the U.S. in 18 international competitions and was a member of the 1984 and 1988 Olympic teams. He captured a silver medal as a member of the U.S. team at the 1983 World Championships and was also a member of the 1987 World Championship team. After graduating from UCLA, Banks went on to the university's law school. During this period, he became known as the "Bouncing Barrister." He popularized the triple jump by encouraging the crowd to clap as he prepared for his run-up and by engaging spectators during a meet. In 1985, Banks was the Track & Field News and U.S. Olympic Committee Athlete of the Year. He also served USATF as chair of the Athletes Advisory Committee in addition to serving as organization vice president.

Records Held
World Record: Triple Jump - 17.97 m (June 16, 1985 - )
American Record: Triple Jump - 17.27 m

Championships
1984 Olympics: Triple Jump (6th)
1988 Olympics: Triple Jump (6th)
1983 World Championships: Triple Jump (2nd)
1987 World Championships: Triple Jump
1985 National Championships: Triple Jump - 17.97 m (1st)

Education
high school: Oceanside (Calif.) High School (Oceanside, California), 1974
undergraduate: UCLA (Los Angeles, California), 1978

Occupations
Consulting

Cleve Abbott

Inducted: 1996, coach

Born: December 9, 1894 - Yankton, South Dakota
Deceased: April 16, 1995


Career Highlights

  • As coach of women's track and field at Tuskegee Institute, Abbott won 14 national outdoor championships

One of the pioneer coaches of women's track and field, Cleve Abbott was head coach of the women's team at Tuskegee Institute from 1936 to 1955. During that period, his Golden Tigers won 14 national outdoor titles, including eight in a row. Tuskegee athletes won 49 indoor and outdoor individual titles. Six of his athletes were on the Olympic team, including gold medalists Alice Coachman and Mildred McDaniel. Three of his athletes -- Coachman, McDaniel and Nell Jackson -- have been inducted into the Hall of Fame. He was still coaching at Tuskegee when he died in 1955. An outstanding athlete while in high school and college, Abbott was hired to teach and coach at Tuskegee Institute in 1915 by the great educator, Booker T. Washington. He had exceptional success as Tuskegee's football coach, winning nine national titles over a 32-year period. In addition to being an outstanding coach, Abbott served on the women's committee of the former National AAU (a predecessor of USA Track & Field) and twice was on the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Committee. He is also a member of the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame.

Education
high school: Watertown (Watertown, South Dakota), 1912
undergraduate: South Dakota State (Brookings, South Dakota), 1916

Occupations
Coach / athletic director

Jesse Abramson

Inducted: 1981, journalist

Born: March 10, 1904 - Mountaindale, New York
Deceased: June 11, 1979


Career Highlights

  • Winner of career achievement award from the New York Track Writers Association

One of the top journalists in the history of track and field, Jesse Abramson was best known for his long-time coverage of the sport for the now defunct New York Herald Tribune. Abramson covered the 1928 Olympic Games and attended every Olympics until 1976, reporting the event with a candidness and accuracy that was a model for fellow journalists. A sports reporter for 56 years, he was the founder and long-time president of the New York Track Writers Association. After his death, the association created the annual Jesse Abramson Award to the outstanding athlete of the year. In addition to his track and field writing, Abramson was also a skilled reporter in boxing and college football. He received numerous awards for his coverage of all three sports during his career. After the Herald Tribune folded in 1966, Abramson directed the U.S. Olympic Invitational indoor meet and served in that capacity until his death.

Education
high school: Stuyvesant (Stuyvesant, New York)

Occupations
Journalist

David Albritton

Inducted: 1980, athlete

Born: April 13, 1913 - Danville, Alabama
Deceased: May 14, 1994

Events
High Jump - 2.08 m


One of the first high jumpers to use the straddle technique, Dave Albritton had a long career that spanned three decades and numerous titles. He also had a number of similarities with all-time great Jesse Owens. Both were born in Danville, Ala.; both attended East Technical High School in Cleveland; both competed in the 1936 Olympic Games; and both are members of the National Track & Field Hall of Fame. As a sophomore at Ohio State, Albritton won the National Collegiate Athletic Association championship in 1936. At the Olympic Trials that year, he and Cornelius Johnson both jumped a world-record height of 6' 9 3/4" and tied at 6' 8" at the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) championships. At the Berlin Olympics, Albritton finished second to Johnson with a leap of 6' 6 3/4". He claimed the silver medal in a jump-off after he and two other jumpers cleared the same height. Albritton won two more NCAA titles, in 1937 and 1938; was AAU champion in 1937, 1946 and 1947, and tied for the title in 1938, 1945, and 1950; he also tied for the AAU indoor title in 1944. He later became a politician and served in the Ohio House of Representatives.

Records Held
World Record: High Jump - 2.08 m (July 12, 1936 - )

Championships
1936 Olympics: High Jump (2nd)
1936 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1937 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1938 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1944 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1945 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1946 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1947 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1950 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1937 NCAA: High Jump (1st)
1938 NCAA: High Jump (1st)

Education
high school: East Technical (Cleveland, Ohio), 1934
undergraduate: Ohio State (Columbus, Ohio), 1938

Occupations
Member of the Ohio House of Representatives

Roxanne Andersen (Atkins)

Inducted: 1991, athlete

Born: June 26, 1912 - Montreal, Quebec CA

Events
100 m hurdles


Career Highlights

  • In 1982, she received the President's Award for meritorious service to track and field.

As Roxy Atkins, she was a top sprinter-hurdler for Canada in the 1930s, placing fourth at the 1934 British Empire Games, a forerunner of the present Commonwealth Games, and sixth at the Women's World Games. She won the 1934 U.S. indoor 50-meter hurdles title, defeating Olympic medalist and future Hall of Famer Evelyne Hall Adams. In 1936, she ran for Canada at the Olympic Games and finished second at the U.S. indoor championships. After marrying and moving to California following World War II, she became a U.S. citizen. Andersen pioneered women's and age group track and field programs and her activities were later used as a model for national programs. By the 1950s, she was active in the governance of U.S. track and field, serving continuously on the women's track and field national committee -- first for the Amateur Athletic Union, later for The Athletics Congress (TAC) -- and became co-chair of the women's track and field committee in 1958. She was a staff member for many other national teams, including the U.S. contingent to the Pan American Games in 1971 and 1983. Andersen has authored several articles on the sport, as well as a publication on the effects of athletic competition on girls and women. She received the President's Award for years of meritorious service to athletes in 1982.

Championships
1936 Olympics:
1934 British Empire Games: (4th)
1934 Women's World Games: (6th)
1934 US Indoors: 50 m hurdles (1st)
1936 US Indoors: (2nd)

Occupations
Coach
Track & field administrator

Horace Ashenfelter

Photo of Horace Ashenfelter

Inducted: 1975, athlete

Born: January 23, 1923 - Phoenixville, Pennsylvania

Events
3,000 m steeplechase - 8:45.40
2 mi. - 8:50


The only American to hold the world record in the steeplechase, Horace Ashenfelter achieved that feat at the 1952 Olympic Games, winning in 8:45.4. In that race, he overcame the challenge of the favorite, Vladimir Kazantsev of the Soviet Union, who had lowered his world record to 8:48.6 just six weeks before the Games. The victory helped Ashenfelter win the 1952 Sullivan Award, which goes annually to the nation's top amateur athlete. Nicknamed "Nip," Ashenfelter won the NCAA two-mile championship while a senior at Penn State in 1949. During his collegiate years, he began steeplechasing, applying lessons from high-school physics to develop a unique style of clearing the event's water jump. He won his first of three National AAU titles in the steeplechase in 1951. In all, he won 17 national championships at a variety of distances, from two to six miles and from the indoor 3 mile to cross country. An FBI agent during his competitive days, Ashenfelter later became a salesman. He had a brother, Bill, who also was an Olympic steeplechaser in 1952. Their brother, Don, was also a distance runner. All three Ashenfelters ran on a Penn State relay team that won the Penn Relays 4-mile title in 1949.

Records Held
World Record: 3,000 m steeplechase - 8:45.40 (July 27, 1952 - )

Championships
1952 Olympics: 3,000 m steeplechase
1956 Olympics: 3,000 m steeplechase - 8:45.40 (1st)
1951 AAU: 3,000 m steeplechase (1st)
1949 NCAA: 2 mi. (1st)

Education
high school: Collegeville (Collegeville, Pennsylvania), 1941
undergraduate: Penn State (State College, Pennsylvania), 1949

Occupations
FBI agent
Salesman

Evelyn Ashford

Photo of Evelyn Ashford

Inducted: 1997, athlete

Born: April 15, 1957 - Shreveport, Louisiana

Events
100 m - 10.76
200 m - 21.83


One of the greatest women's sprinters in track and field history, Evelyn Ashford ranked first in the world four times and was the top-ranked American seven times, including four in a row from 1981 to 1984. A competitor at the 1976 Olympic Games while attending UCLA, she also competed in the 1984, 1988 and 1992 Games, winning four gold medals and a silver. She set an Olympic record when she ran 10.97 to win the 100m at the 1984 Games She was a two-time world record holder in the 100 meters, running 10.79 at Colorado Springs in 1983 and surpassing that record when she ran 10.76 in Zurich in 1984. Among her greatest achievements was her double victory at the 1979 World Cup when she defeated East Germany's dominant sprinters, beating Marlies Gohr in the 100m and world-record holder Marita Koch in the 200m. She repeated her double sprint victories in the 1981 World Cup. Overall, she was on 15 national teams during the period from 1976 to 1992, a very long career for a sprinter. She won 19 national titles, including six indoors.

Records Held
World Record: 100 m - 10.79
World Record: 100 m - 10.76 (August 22, 1984 - )
Olympic Record: 100 m - 10.97

Championships
1976 Olympics: 100 m (5th)
1984 Olympics: 100 m - 10.97 (1st)
1984 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1988 Olympics: 100 m (2nd)
1988 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1992 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1979 World Cup: 100 m (1st)
1979 World Cup: 200 m (1st)
1981 World Cup: 100 m (1st)
1981 World Cup: 200 m (1st)

Education
high school: Roseville (Roseville, California), 1975
undergraduate: UCLA (Los Angeles, California), 1978

Occupations
Business

Andy Bakjian

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Inducted: 1986, official

Born: August 20, 1914 - Union City, New Jersey
Deceased: February 26, 1986


Career Highlights

  • Each year, USATF presents the Andy Bakjian Award to an outstanding official.

Andy Bakjian began his early track experience as a high school coach in Southern California after World War II. An alternate on the U.S. wrestling team selected for the 1940 Olympic Games (which were cancelled following the outbreak of war), Bakjian was knowledgeable in several sports. He coached football, baseball and track at Jefferson High School in Los Angeles. Serving at many of the top track and field meets in Southern California, Bakjian established himself as a leading official. In 1969, he was named commissioner of track officials for the Southern Pacific Association of the former AAU. He later chaired the national officials committee for The Athletics Congress (as USATF was then known) from 1980 to 1984. In 1984, he headed the panel that selected the slate of officials for the Olympic Games in Los Angeles. He also served as chief referee of running events at the Games. Bakjian received many awards during his career, including a President's Award in 1981.

Occupations
Official
Coach

Weemie (Weems) Baskin

Photo of Weemie (Weems) Baskin

Inducted: 1982, coach

Born: July 25, 1904 - Carrolton, Georgia
Deceased: May 10, 1993


A head track coach for 33 years, most of them at the University of South Carolina, Weemie "Weems" Baskin also was an outstanding hurdler at Auburn University where he was coached by another Hall of Famer, Wilbur Hutsell. He retired from South Carolina in 1969 after 26 years of coaching, during which he compiled a record of 90 victories and 47 defeats in dual meet competition. A former president of the National Collegiate Track and Field Coaches Association, he and University of Michigan coach Don Canham helped started the NCAA indoor championships in Detroit. His coaching career began at the University of Georgia, where he helped developed high hurdles world-record holder Forrest "Spec" Towns, also a Hall of Famer. After seven years at Georgia, he coached at the University of Mississippi from 1938 to 1943. At one point in his career, he was also a sportswriter in New York. Highlights of his athletic career at Auburn University included a national collegiate hurdles title in 1927 as well as an AAU outdoor championship that same year and an AAU indoor championship in 1928.

Championships
1927 AAU: (1st)
1928 AAU: (1st)
1927 NCAA: (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Auburn (Auburn, Alabama), 1927

Occupations
Coach

James Bausch

Photo of James Bausch

Inducted: 1979, athlete

Born: March 29, 1906 - Marion Junction, South Dakota
Deceased: July 9, 1974

Events
Decathlon - 6735 pts.


One of the greatest athletes ever produced by the University of Kansas, Bausch starred in track, basketball and football, earning the nickname of "Jarring Jim" for his exploits as a fullback. He started his college career at Wichita State, where he competed in football, basketball and track before transferring to Kansas. As a track athlete at Kansas, Bausch threw the discus, javelin and shot, but wasn't quite good enough to win a national championship in any of these events. After becoming a multi-event competitor, he won the National AAU pentathlon in 1931 and was sixth in the decathlon. A year later, he won the AAU decathlon in his second try at the 10-event competition. At the Olympics, he made his third decathlon truly memorable, setting a world record while capturing the gold medal. He won four of the ten events, including the pole vault, where he cleared 13' 1 1/2", which would have earned him fifth place in the Olympic vault competition. His Olympic victory helped him win the 1932 Sullivan Award as the top amateur athlete of the year. Bausch later played pro football, served in World War II and was an insurance salesman.

Championships
1932 Olympics: Decathlon - 6735 pts. (1st)
1931 AAU: Pentathlon (1st)
1931 AAU: Decathlon (6th)
1932 AAU: Decathlon (1st)

Education
high school: Wichita Cathedral (Wichita, Kansas), 1927
undergraduate: Kansas (Lawrence, Kansas), 1931

Occupations
Professional football player
Insurance salesman

Bob Beamon

Photo of Bob Beamon

Inducted: 1977, athlete

Born: August 29, 1946 - Jamaica, New York

Events
Long Jump - 8.90 m


On October 18, 1968, Bob Beamon made track and field history by setting a world long jump record of 29' 2 1/2" that stood for 23 years. He broke the existing world mark by almost two feet, prompting Soviet rival jumper Igor Ter-Ovanesyan to say, "Compared to this jump, we are as children." An outstanding jumper while at Jamaica High School, Beamon set a national high school for record for the triple jump in 1965. At the University of Texas in El Paso, he demonstrated his versatility when he won the national collegiate indoor long jump and triple jump. In 1968, he emerged as a potential Olympic champion when he won the long jump at 22 of 23 meets, including the National AAU outdoor title and the Olympic Trials. However, no one was prepared for his extraordinary jump at the Mexico City Games. The following year, Beamon repeated as National AAU champion but competed sporadically after that. An Olympic comeback attempt in 1972 fell short and he became a professional in 1973. He was elected to the Olympic Hall of Fame in 1983. With his wife, Milana Walter Beamon, he is co-author of his autobiography, The Man Who Could Fly.

Records Held
World Record: Long Jump - 8.90 m (October 18, 1968 - )

Championships
1968 Olympics: Long Jump - 8.90 m (1st)
1968 AAU: Long Jump (1st)
1968 Olympic Trials: Long Jump (1st)
1969 AAU: Long Jump (1st)

Education
high school: Jamaica (Jamaica, New York), 1968
undergraduate: UTEP (El Paso, Texas)
undergraduate: Adelphi (Garden City, New York), 1972

Occupations
Community and social worker

Percy Beard

Photo of Percy Beard

Inducted: 1981, athlete

Born: January 26, 1908 - Hardinsburg, Kentucky
Deceased: March 27, 1990

Events
110 m hurdles - 14.20


An outstanding track and field athlete and coach, Percy Beard was a world-class hurdler with both Auburn University and the New York A.C. He set a world record of 14.2 in the 120-yard high hurdles in 1931 and tied the record in 1934. A seven-time National AAU high hurdles champion, Beard was the silver medalist at the 1932 Olympic Games, finishing second to George Sailing of the U.S. after hitting the sixth hurdle. While at Auburn, Beard's coach was Wilbur Hutsell, also a Hall of Fame enshrine. Beard later became an outstanding coach at the University of Florida from 1937 to 1964. He used his civil engineering education to become a pioneer in the development of all-weather tracks.

Records Held
World Record: 110 m hurdles - 14.20 (August 6, 1934 - )

Championships
1932 Olympics: (2nd)

Education
undergraduate: Auburn (Auburn, Alabama), 1935

Occupations
Coach

Jim Beatty

Photo of Jim Beatty

Inducted: 1990, athlete

Born: October 28, 1934 - New York, New York

Events
1,500 m - 3:39.40
1 mi. - 3:55.50
2 mi. - 8:30
5,000 m - 13:45.00


Jim Beatty is best remembered as the first man to break the four-minute mile barrier indoors with a 3:58.9 performance in February 1962 in Los Angeles, surpassing the existing record by 2.5 seconds. The performance served as a harbinger of a great year for the diminutive Beatty (5' 6", 130 lbs.) That year, he set American records in five events during a 16-day stretch, which included the 1500m (Oslo, Aug. 9), mile (Helsinki, Aug. 21), 3000m (Avranches, France, Aug. 15) and both the 3 mile and 5000m in one race (Turku, Finland, Aug. 24). Beatty became the first American to hold records simultaneously in all events from 1500 to 5000 meters. That magical year saw Beatty break a total of seven U.S. records and a world record at 2 miles. Beatty earned the 1960 Sullivan Award as the nation's top amateur athlete. Beatty's transformation from a capable but unheralded college runner to record setter began in 1959 when he moved to California to join the training group of legendary coach Mihaly Igloi. Competing for the Los Angeles Track Club, Beatty made the 1960 Olympic team but failed to advance to the 5000m final in Rome. He earned four national titles during his career, winning the mile in 1962 and earning indoor mile titles from 1961 to 1963. He was second in the 1500m in the 1963 Pan American Games. Following his running career, Beatty headed up an executive search firm. He also went into politics, serving as a state legislator in North Carolina but failing in his bid to win a seat in the U.S. Senate.

Records Held
World Record: 2 mi. - 8:30 (June 8, 1962 - )
American Record: 1,500 m - 3:39.40 (August 9, 1962 - )
American Record: 5,000 m - 13:45.00 (August 24, 1962 - )

Championships
1960 Olympics: 5,000 m
1961 AAU Indoors: 1 mi. (1st)
1962 AAU: 1 mi. (1st)
1962 AAU Indoors: 1 mi. (1st)
1963 AAU Indoors: 1 mi. (1st)
1963 Pan Am Games: 1,500 m (2nd)

Education
high school: Central (Charlotte, North Carolina), 1953
undergraduate: North Carolina (Chapel Hill, North Carolina), 1957

Occupations
Executive recruiter
Politician

Earl Bell

Inducted: 2002, athlete

Born: August 25, 1955 - Ancon, PA

Events
Pole Vault - 5.87 m


One of the most accomplished U.S. men's pole vaulters in history, Earl Bell tied Thierry Vigneron of France for the bronze medal at the 1984 Olympic Games with a clearance of 18' 4 1/2". Bell qualified for two additional U.S. Olympic teams, placing sixth in 1976 and fourth in 1988. The gold medalist at the 1975 Pan American Games, Bell also won the silver medal at the 1987 World Indoor Championships and the bronze medal at the 1986 Goodwill Games. Bell won three U.S. Outdoor (1976, 1984, 1990) and three U.S. Indoor (1980, 1984, 1987) titles during his career. At Arkansas State University, he won three NCAA Outdoor titles (1975, 1976, 1977) and two NCAA Indoor titles (1975, 1976). Bell set the world outdoor record of 18' 7 1/4" on May 29, 1976 in Wichita, Kans., and set an American record of 19' 0 1/4" in San Jose, Calif. on June 9, 1984. He now is renowned as one of the top pole vault coaches in the country, with American record holder Jeff Hartwig, Olympians Kellie Suttle and Chad Harting, and 2001 World Indoor silver medalist Tye Harvey among the athletes training under him.

Records Held
World Record: Pole Vault - 5.67 m (May 29, 1976 - )
American Record: Pole Vault - 5.80 m (June 9, 1984 - )

Championships
1976 Olympics: Pole Vault (6th)
1984 Olympics: Pole Vault - 5.60 m (3rd)
1988 Olympics: Pole Vault (4th)
1986 Goodwill Games: Pole Vault (3rd)
1987 World Indoors: Pole Vault (2nd)
1976 US Outdoors: Pole Vault (1st)
1980 US Indoors: Pole Vault (1st)
1984 US Indoors: Pole Vault (1st)
1984 US Outdoors: Pole Vault (1st)
1987 US Indoors: Pole Vault (1st)
1990 US Outdoors: Pole Vault (1st)
1975 Pan Am Games: Pole Vault (1st)
1975 NCAA Indoor: Pole Vault (1st)
1975 NCAA Outdoor: Pole Vault (1st)
1976 NCAA Indoor: Pole Vault (1st)
1976 NCAA Outdoor: Pole Vault (1st)
1977 NCAA Outdoor: Pole Vault (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Arkansas State (Jonesboro, Arkansas), 1988

Occupations
Coach

Greg Bell

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Inducted: 1988, athlete

Born: November 7, 1930 - Terre Haute, Indiana

Events
Long Jump - 8.10 m


The world's top long jumper in the 1950s, Greg Bell highlighted an outstanding track and field career by winning the long jump gold medal at the 1956 Olympic Games, jumping 25' 8 1/4" while a sophomore at Indiana University. His longest jump came in 1957 when he won the national collegiate title with a 26' 7" effort, a meet record that stood for seven years. That same year, he was voted the Most Outstanding Athlete at the Penn Relays for his victories in both the 100 yards and the long jump. Almost 10 years earlier, Bell was second in the long jump at the 1948 Indiana high school championships. His interest in track and field revived during 1950 while he was stationed in the Army near Bordeaux, France. After a few weeks' training, he won the European Armed Forces Championship in Nuremberg, Germany. Following his discharge in 1954, he enrolled at Indiana University. Throughout his college career, Bell was undefeated in the long jump, winning three NCAA championships. He won the first of three National AAU titles in 1955. Rated the world's best long jumper three times, Bell wound up with a total of 13 26-foot long jumps, the most by any long jumper in history up to that time. Bell was also second in the 1959 Pan American Games and competed in the USA-USSR dual meet that same year. He later became a dentist in Logansport, Ind., and director of dentistry at Logansport State Hospital.

Championships
1956 Olympics: Long Jump - 7.83 m (1st)
1955 AAU: Long Jump (1st)
1959 Pan Am Games: Long Jump (2nd)
1957 NCAA: Long Jump - 8.10 m (1st)

Education
high school: Garfield (Terre Haute, Indiana), 1948
undergraduate: Indiana (Bloomington, Indiana), 1961

Occupations
Dentist

Sam Bell

Inducted: 1992, coach

Born: March 7, 1928 - Columbus, Missouri


The long-time head track and field coach at Indiana University, Sam Bell developed a reputation as not only an outstanding coach but as an excellent meet director. While at Indiana from 1970 to 1998, he produced teams that won 23 men's and 4 women's Big Ten titles. On 18 occasions, Bell's teams placed in the top 10 in NCAA championships. His cross country teams won two NCAA individual titles. Individually, he coached more than 90 All-American athletes, including Olympians Bob Kennedy, Jim Spivey, Mark Deady, Sunder Nix, Terry Brahm, Robert Cannon and Albert Robinson. At the same time, he was meet director or technical director of some of the top meets in the world. He was a U.S. Olympic team assistant coach in 1976 and was the head coach of the 1979 World Cup team. After earning his M.S. in physical education from the University of Oregon in 1956, he entered the college coaching ranks two years later at Oregon State University. In 1961, his Oregon State team won the NCAA cross country title. In 1965, he became the head coach at the University of California and was there four years before moving to Indiana. Bell also has served on numerous AAU and TAC committees. As chairman for the Men's Olympic Development Festival from 1976 to 1980, he developed the festival's format for track and field.

Education
high school: Aurora (Aurora, Nebraska), 1945
undergraduate: Doane College (Crete, Nebraska), 1950

Occupations
Coach

Delores (Dee) Boeckmann

Inducted: 1976, athlete

Born: November 9, 1904 - St. Louis, Missouri
Deceased: April 25, 1989

Events
50 m - 6.10
800 yd. - 2:31.00


A pioneer in U.S. women's track and field, Delores "Dee" Boeckmann was on the first women's Olympic team in 1928, running in the 800 meters in Amsterdam but failing to reach the finals. During the 1920s, she held numerous track records from the 50-yard dash to the mile. She was also the first U.S. Olympic women's coach, taking the team to the 1936 Games in Berlin. Boeckmann was the first woman to chair a national Olympic committee when she assumed this responsibility for track and field and the first woman national chair of the AAU track team. In 1950, at the urging of General Douglas McArthur, she became track and field coach of the Japanese women's track and field team, making her the first American woman to coach a foreign national team. Boeckmann also was a pioneer for women's participation in other sports, particularly basketball. A teacher and government worker, she was with the Red Cross in China during World War II.

Records Held
World Record: 50 m - 6.10

Championships
1928 Olympics: 800 m

Education
high school: Pacific (St. Louis, Missouri)

Occupations
Coach
Teacher
Government worker

John Borican

Inducted: 2000, athlete

Born: April 4, 1913 - Bridgeton, New Jersey
Deceased: January 4, 1943

Events
800 m - 1:51.00
1,000 yd. - 2:10.50
1,000 m - 2:24.30


An excellent all-around athlete, John Borican demonstrated his versatility by winning national titles in the pentathlon (1938 and 1939), the decathlon (1941) and the 800 meters (1941 and 1942). He also was a good 400m hurdler and placed second in that event at the 1938 USA-Germany dual meet. It was indoors, however, where Borican posted his most impressive achievements. His best season was 1939, when he won 11 of 15 races and set world indoor bests in the 800 meters, 880 yards and 1000 yards. He also set a world indoor best at three quarters of a mile in 1940. Overall, he won four straight national indoor titles at 1000 yards or 1000 meters from 1939 to 1942. In 1939, he set his 1000-yard record against another Hall of Famer, Glenn Cunningham, in a match race. One of his outdoor bests was a 46.2 for 440 yards, run on a straight course. World War II prevented Borican from competing in the Olympic Games. A portrait artist by profession, he had his brilliant career cut short on January 4, 1943, when he died of a mysterious form of pernicious anemia.

Records Held
World Record: 1,000 m - 2:24.30

Championships
1938 AAU: Pentathlon (1st)
1939 AAU: Pentathlon (1st)
1941 AAU: Decathlon (1st)
1941 AAU: 800 m (1st)
1942 AAU: 800 m (1st)

Occupations
Portrait artist and illustrator

Ralph Boston

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: May 9, 1939 - Laurel, Mississippi

Events
Long Jump - 8.35 m


Like fellow Hall of Famer Lee Calhoun, Ralph Boston was born in Laurel, Miss., and like Calhoun he became a world record holder and Olympic champion. While attending Tennessee A&I, he competed in the high jump, sprints, and high hurdles as well as the long jump, achieving a ranking as America's fourth-best high jumper in 1959. The following year, he concentrated on the long jump with a goal of making the Olympic team. He did that -- and more. After winning the national college long jump title, he broke Jesse Owens' long-standing world mark with a 26' 11 1/4" effort, then won the gold medal with an Olympic record of 26' 7 3/4" -- only one-half inch better than "Bo" Roberson of the U.S. He was silver medalist at the 1964 Olympics and was third in 1968 to collect a set of Olympic medals. In all, he set or tied the world record six times and his last mark of 27' 5" was the one Bob Beamon broke at Mexico City. Throughout the 1960s, he had an intense rivalry with Soviet long jumper Igor Ter-Ovanesyan, who finished behind Boston at all three Olympics. Boston won six consecutive National AAU long jump championships outdoors and also had a national indoor title. He also won the AAU indoor hurdles title in 1965, placed fourth in the high jump at the 1963 Pan American Games, and was the top-ranked U.S. triple jumper in 1963. Boston retired after the 1968 Olympics and became an administrator at the University of Tennessee and also did some television commentary. He was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1985 and was one of eight current and former Olympians chosen to raise the Olympic Flag at the opening ceremonies of the 1996 Games in Atlanta.

Records Held
World Record: Long Jump - 8.36 m (May 29, 1965 - October 18, 1968)

Championships
1960 Olympics: Long Jump - 8.12 m (1st)
1964 Olympics: Long Jump (2nd)
1968 Olympics: Long Jump (3rd)
1965 AAU Indoors: (1st)
1963 Pan Am Games: High Jump (4th)
1960 NCAA: Long Jump - 8.21 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Tennessee A&I (Nashville, Tennessee), 1960

Occupations
College administration
Television commentator

Tom Botts

Photo of Tom Botts

Inducted: 1983, coach

Born: March 28, 1904 - Mexico, Missouri
Deceased: March 1, 1999


Career Highlights

  • During his tenure with University of Missouri, Botts coached the 1965 NCAA-winning cross country team.

The coach at the University of Missouri for 26 years, Thomas "Tom" Botts developed the Tigers into one of the powers of the former Big Eight Conference. During his coaching tenure, his teams won four indoor and four outdoor conference titles. His 1965 cross country team won the national collegiate title and his harriers also claimed a pair of Big Eight titles. Overall, he coached 27 All-American athletes. Botts was a graduate of Westminster College in Missouri, where he played basketball and was an all-conference hurdler under Brutus Hamilton, also a Hall of Famer. After coaching at Fort Scott (Kansas) Junior College from 1931 to 1941, Botts went to Missouri as an assistant coach. In 1944, he became head coach and in 1961 was an assistant coach on the U.S. team that toured Europe. In 1970, Botts was the NCAA Coach of the Year and he retired two years later. He is also a member of the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame and the Drake Relays Coaches Hall of Fame.

Education
undergraduate: Westminster (Fulton, Missouri), 1927

Occupations
Coach

Bill Bowerman

Photo of Bill Bowerman

Inducted: 1981, coach

Born: February 9, 1911 - Portland, Oregon
Deceased: December 24, 1999


Career Highlights

  • Teams coached by Bowerman won four national collegiate championships

One of the nation's most successful coaches during his tenure at the University of Oregon, Bill Bowerman also was the inventor of the waffle sole for running shoes. In addition, he helped to spread the gospel of jogging to the people of Eugene, Ore., and eventually to a nation of joggers. While an undergraduate at the University of Oregon, Bowerman played basketball and football for four years and joined the track team as a 440-yard runner in his junior year. After coaching high school sports in Portland and Medford, Ore., he fought for the U.S. Army in World War II. In 1949, Bowerman returned to the University of Oregon to replace his former coach, Bill Hayward, who had died. Over the next 23 years, Bowerman produced four national collegiate championship teams plus two more that were runners-up. Individually, his athletes set 13 world and 22 American records. Among his 23 Olympic athletes were gold medalist Otis Davis, Dyrol Burleson, Jim Grelle, bronze medalist (and Hall of Famer) Bill Dellinger, Ken Moore, Wade Bell and the late Steve Prefontaine (who is also in the Hall of Fame). In the early 1960s, when he took his team to New Zealand for a competition there, he was impressed by the jogging boom in that country. Back in Eugene, he started the country's first running club and subsequently wrote a book called Jogging about running for fun and fitness. His message caught hold. He next created the first lightweight outsole shoe that was particularly well suited to distance running. After retiring from coaching in 1972, he became active with the Nike Shoe Company.

Education
high school: Medford (Medford, Oregon), 1930
undergraduate: Oregon (Eugene, Oregon), 1934

Occupations
Coach
Shoe design consultant

Don Bragg

Photo of Don Bragg

Inducted: 1996, athlete

Born: May 15, 1935 - Penns Grove, New Jersey

Events
Pole Vault - 4.81 m


Don Bragg was the last of the great pole vaulters to use a steel pole. From 1954 until 1960, he was always world ranked and capped a brilliant career in 1960 by setting a world record of 15' 9 1/4" at the Olympic Trials and winning an Olympic gold medal with a vault of 15' 5". He set a world indoor record of 15' 9 1/2" at Philadelphia in 1959 and, like Hall of Famer Cornelius Warmerdam, vaulted better indoors than outdoors. At 6' 3" and 197 pounds, Bragg was one of the largest vaulters in history. While at Villanova University, he won the NCAA pole vault championship in 1955 and was the IC4A champion, both indoors and outdoors, from 1955 to 1957. He also tied for the AAU indoor championship. After graduating in 1957, Bragg again tied for the AAU indoor championship in 1958, then won the event from 1959 through 1961. He was also the AAU outdoor champion in 1959. Nicknamed "Tarzan" because of his size and strength, Bragg's goal was to play that role in the movies. His dream was unfulfilled. He later became athletic director at Stockton State College (N.J.), the owner of a summer camp, and the author of A Chance to Dare: The Don Bragg Story.

Records Held
World Record: Pole Vault - 4.81 m
World Record: Pole Vault - 4.81 m (July 2, 1960 - )

Championships
1960 Olympics: Pole Vault - 4.70 m (1st)
1957 AAU Indoors: Pole Vault (1st)
1958 AAU Indoors: Pole Vault (1st)
1959 AAU Indoors: Pole Vault (1st)
1959 AAU Outdoors: Pole Vault (1st)
1960 AAU Indoors: Pole Vault (1st)
1961 AAU Indoors: Pole Vault (1st)
1955 NCAA: Pole Vault (1st)

Education
high school: Penns Grove (Penns Grove, New Jersey), 1953
undergraduate: Villanova (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 1957

Occupations
Coach

Valerie Brisco

Photo of Valerie Brisco

Inducted: 1995, athlete

Born: July 6, 1960 - Greenwood, Mississippi

Events
200 m - 21.81
400 m - 48.83


More than a decade before Michael Johnson galvanized world attention with his 200m/400m doubles, Valerie Brisco became the first person to perform that feat in the Olympics. Her stage was ideal: the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, just miles from her home at that time. She set American records in both individual events, running 21.81 in the 200m and 48.83 in the 400m. She won her third gold medal that year when she anchored the U.S. 4x400m relay team that set an American record with its time of 3:18.28. In 1988, Brisco won her fourth Olympic medal when she ran the third leg on the 4x400m relay team that broke the world record but finished second to the USSR team. Her previous running career barely hinted at her true abilities. She won the 1979 AIAW 200m championship while a student at California State-Northridge and was on the 4x100m relay team that won a gold medal at the Pan American Games. After marrying and giving birth to a child, she put her running career on hold. She finally underwent a rigorous training program in time to emerge as a superstar in 1984, winning the national indoor 200 and outdoor 400 titles that year. She became the first American woman to break 50 seconds in the 400 meters with her time of 49.83. In 1985, she set an indoor world record of 52.99 in the 400-yard run, and she was the national champion in the outdoor 400m in 1986. In 1987, she won a relay gold medal at the Pan American Games and a bronze medal as a member of the 4x400m relay at the World Outdoor Championships.

Records Held
World Record: 400 m - 52.99
American Record: 200 m - 21.81 (August 9, 1984 - )
American Record: 400 m - 48.83 (August 6, 1984 - )
American Record: 1,600 m relay - 3:18.28

Championships
1984 Olympics: 200 m - 21.81 (1st)
1984 Olympics: 400 m - 48.83 (1st)
1984 Olympics: 1,600 m relay - 3:18.28 (1st)
1988 Olympics: 1,600 m relay (2nd)
1987 World Outdoors: 1,600 m relay (3rd)
1979 Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women: 200 m (1st)
1984 US Indoors: 200 m (1st)
1984 US Outdoors: 400 m - 49.83 (1st)
1986 US Outdoors: 400 m (1st)
1987 Pan Am Games: (1st)

Education
junior college: Long Beach Community College
undergraduate: California State-Northridge (Northridge, California), 1979

Occupations
Athlete

Doris Brown (Heritage)

Photo of Doris Brown (Heritage)

Inducted: 1990, athlete

Born: September 17, 1942 - Tacoma, Washington

Events
800 m - 2:02.20
1,500 m - 4:14.40
3,000 m - 9:46.90
2 mi. - 10:07


A pioneer in women's distance running, Doris Brown Heritage won the world cross country championships from 1967 to 1972 -- the first five years in which this international competition took place. Undeterred by the obstacles women faced in the sport during those years, she had already developed her versatility as a runner. After being barred from even using the school track while she was in Peninsula High School, she joined a local running club and set a national record in the 440-yard dash. She next trained for the 800 meters -- the longest event then on the Olympic program for women -- and finished third at the 1960 Trials. Unfortunately, her time didn't qualify her for the Rome Olympics. That year, she entered Seattle Pacific College and began running with the men's team. A broken foot kept her off the 1964 Olympic team, but she pressed ahead. In 1966, she became the first women to run a sub-5 minute mile indoors, clocking 4:52. By the following year, she began her string of five world cross country championships. In 1968, she finished fifth in the 800 meters at the Mexico City Olympics. She set world records at 3000m and two miles during 1971, and that year, took a silver medal in the 800m at the Pan American Games. In all, she represented the U.S. on nine world cross country teams and won 14 national titles. An outstanding distance running coach at Seattle Pacific University, she was named an assistant coach for the U.S. women's team at the 1984 Olympics and 1987 Outdoor World Championships. She is also the first female member of the Cross Country and Road Running Committee of the IAAF, the world's governing body for the sport. In addition, Heritage is a member of the Distance Running Hall of Fame.

Records Held
World Record: 3,000 m - 9:26.90 (July 7, 1971 - )
World Record: 2 mi. - 10:07 (July 7, 1971 - )

Championships
1968 Olympics: 800 m (5th)
1971 Pan Am Games: 800 m (2nd)

Education
high school: Peninsula (Gig Harbor, Washington), 1960
undergraduate: Seattle Pacific University (Seattle, Washington), 1964

Occupations
Teacher
Coach
Administrator

Avery Brundage

Photo of Avery Brundage

Inducted: 1974, administrator

Born: September 28, 1887
Deceased: May 8, 1975


Career Highlights

  • President of the International Olympic Committee, 1929-1953

A highly successful businessman, Avery Brundage was equally successful as an athlete and administrator. As an athlete, he was three-time National AAU champion in the decathlon and pentathlon. At the 1912 Olympics, he was 22nd in the discus, fifth in the pentathlon and 14th in the decathlon. He devoted almost half a century to the administration of track and field, serving as many as four positions concurrently. Brundage was president of the Central Amateur Athletic Union from 1928 to 1933; president of the AAU in those same years and again in 1935; and president of the U.S. Olympic Committee from 1929 to 1953. After becoming a member of the International Olympic Committee in 1936, he became its president from 1952 to 1972. A multimillionaire contractor, Brundage devoted a large portion of his fortume to amateur athletics.

Championships
1912 Olympics: Discus Throw (22nd)
1912 Olympics: Pentathlon (5th)
1912 Olympics: Decathlon (14th)

Education
high school: Chicago English (Chicago, Illinois), 1905
undergraduate: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Champaign, Illinois), 1909

Occupations
Businessman
Track & field administrator

Jim Bush

Photo of Jim Bush

Inducted: 1987, coach

Born: September 15, 1926 - Cleveland, Ohio


Career Highlights

  • Bush's UCLA teams won five NCAA championships

One of the most successful college track and field coaches in history, Jim Bush coached some of the world's top athletes during his 20-year tenure at UCLA. As coach of the Bruins, he produced five NCAA championship teams, 21 Olympic team members and a glittering 152 victories and only 21 losses in dual meet competition (an 87.9 winning percentage). In addition, his UCLA teams won seven Pacific-10 Conference titles and were undefeated in 10 dual meet seasons. Highly regarded by his peers, he was twice selected as "Coach of the Year" by the U.S. Track Coaches Association, serving as president of that group in 1972-73. The author of several coaching books, he was the head U.S. track coach at the 1979 Pan American Games. While at the University of California, Bush competed in the 400-yard dash and the high hurdles. His collegiate coaching career started at Fullerton Junior College in 1960. After three seasons at Occidental College from 1962 to 1965, he became head coach at UCLA. After leaving UCLA in 1984, Bush served as a consultant in various track and running-related activities.

Education
high school: Fullerton (Fullerton, California), 1947
undergraduate: California (Berkeley, California), 1951

Occupations
Coach

Lee Calhoun

Photo of Lee Calhoun

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: February 23, 1933 - Laurel, Mississippi
Deceased: June 22, 1989

Events
110 m hurdles - 13.20


Lee Calhoun is the first athlete to win the 110m hurdles at two different Olympics. In both Olympics, he won by slim margins and led U.S. 1-2-3 sweeps. The first time, in 1956, he entered the season with a time of only 14.4 seconds, but improved by almost a full second, winning the gold medal in a time of 13.5. His second gold medal was less of a surprise, for he tied the world record of 13.2 in Bern, Switzerland shortly before the Rome Olympics. In Rome, he won in 13.98, beating Willie May of the U.S. by one-hundredth of a second. Shortly before the Rome Olympics, he tied the world record of 13.2 for both yards and meters. While at North Carolina Central College under Hall of Fame coach Leroy Walker, Calhoun won the 1956 and 1957 NCAA titles. He also won five National AAU titles, three of them outdoors. After retiring from competition, he became a college track coach, first at Grambling University, then at Yale, and finally at Western Illinois University. He was an assistant Olympic coach in 1976 and was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1990. Calhoun's memory lives on with the annual running of the Lee Calhoun High School Invitational hosted by North Carolina Central.

Records Held
World Record: 110 m hurdles - 13.20 (August 21, 1960 - )

Championships
1956 Olympics: 110 m hurdles - 13.50 (1st)
1960 Olympics: 110 m hurdles - 13.98 (1st)
1956 NCAA: 110 m hurdles (1st)
1957 NCAA: 110 m hurdles (1st)

Education
undergraduate: North Carolina Central (Durham, North Carolina), 1957

Occupations
Coach

Milt Campbell

Photo of Milt Campbell

Inducted: 1989, athlete

Born: December 9, 1933 - Plainfield, New Jersey

Events
Decathlon - 7708 pts.
120 yd. hurdles - 13.40
110 m hurdles - 13.80


When you mention top all-around male athletes in our nation's history, certainly the name of Milt Campbell has to be up there with Jim Thorpe, Bob Mathias, Rafer Johnson, Bruce Jenner and Dan O'Brien. Like them, Campbell was an Olympic decathlon champion but track and field wasn't the only sport in which he excelled. He was also outstanding in football, eventually playing in the National Football and Canadian Leagues. He was an All-American swimmer while in high school and was also national class in karate. While still at Plainfield High School, Campbell finished fifth in the Olympic Trials in the 110m hurdles but made the Olympic team in the decathlon. He gained national prominence by finishing second to Mathias in the Olympic decathlon. The 1953 national decathlon champion, Campbell later won the Olympic decathlon title in 1956. Also a national champion in the high hurdles, he set a 120-yard high hurdles record of 13.4 in 1957 and held the world indoor best of 7.0 for the 60-yard high hurdles. After attending Indiana University where he excelled in both track and football, he played pro football with the Cleveland Browns and the Montreal Alouettes. He has received numerous honors, including being named the world's greatest high school athlete in 1952. The Newark Star-Ledger selected him as the greatest athlete of the 20th century, not only for his sports accomplishments but also for the strength of his character. Campbell is also a member of the Black Athletes' Hall of Fame and the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame.

Records Held
World Record: 120 yd. hurdles - 13.40 (May 31, 1957 - )

Championships
1952 Olympics: Decathlon (2nd)
1956 Olympics: Decathlon - 7708 pts. (1st)
1953 National Championships: Decathlon (1st)

Education
high school: Plainfield (Plainfield, New Jersey), 1953
undergraduate: Indiana (Bloomington, Indiana), 1957

Occupations
Professional football

Henry Carr

Inducted: 1997, athlete

Born: November 27, 1942 - Montgomery, Alabama

Events
100 m - 10.20
200 m - 20.20
400 m - 45.40


One of the greatest long sprinters in U.S. track and field history, Henry Carr was an outstanding high school sprinter in Detroit, Mich., before starring at Arizona University. While competing for the Sun Devils, he won or tied for three national titles, and set world records in the 200m, 220 yards, and 4x400m relay. He was top ranked in the world in the 200 in 1963 and 1964, before losing to Paul Drayton at the 1964 Olympic Trials. In Tokyo, he won handily, setting an Olympic record of 20.3. While running at Arizona State, he also excelled at 400 meters, running the world's sixth fastest time of 45.4 in the summer of 1963. His anchor leg of 44.5 on the 4x400m relay at the 1964 Olympics solidified the U.S. victory in that event. After college, Carr played football with the New York Giants and later the Detroit Lions.

Records Held
World Record: 200 m - 20.20 (April 4, 1964 - )
World Record: 1,600 m relay - 3:00.70
Olympic Record: 200 m - 20.30

Championships
1964 Olympics: 200 m - 20.30 (1st)
1964 Olympics: 1,600 m relay - 3:00.70 (1st)

Education
high school: Detroit Northwestern (Detroit, Michigan), 1961
undergraduate: Arizona State (Tempe, Arizona), 1964

Occupations
Professional football

Chandra Cheeseborough

Photo of Chandra Cheeseborough

Inducted: 2000, athlete

Born: January 10, 1959 - Jacksonville, Florida

Events
200 m - 21.99
400 m - 49.05


Although only 16 years old, Chandra Cheeseborough broken onto the international track scene in spectacular fashion by winning two gold medals at the 1975 Pan American Games, taking the 200m in an American record time of 22.77. Earlier that year, the Jacksonville native had attended a summer track program at Tennessee State University and benefited from the tutelage of Hall of Fame coach Ed Temple. In 1976, she set an American junior record of 11.13 in winning the 100 meters at the national championships, then placed sixth in that event at the Montreal Olympics. After high school, she attended Tennessee State, where she was a member of national championship teams that set world indoor records of 1:08.9 in the 640-yard relay and 1:47.17 in the 800-yard sprint medley relay. She won the national indoor 200-yard dash in 1979, 1981, 1982 and 1983. Her breakthrough year in the 400m came in 1984, when set two American records in the event, then placed second in the Los Angeles Olympics in a career best of 49.04. She made history at the 1984 Games when she became the first woman to win gold medals in both relays, held less than an hour apart. Cheeseborough later became a coach and returned to Tennessee State. She was named head coach of both men and women in 1999, following in Temple's footsteps. She also has served as an assistant coach for the U.S. team at the 1999 Junior Pan-Am Championships.

Records Held
World Record: 640 yd. relay - 1:08.90
American Record: 200 m - 22.77

Championships
1976 Olympics: 100 m (6th)
1984 Olympics: 400 m - 49.04 (2nd)
1984 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1984 Olympics: 1,600 m relay (1st)
1976 National Championships: 100 m - 11.13 (1st)
1979 National Indoor Championships: 200 yd. (1st)
1981 National Indoor Champs: 200 yd. (1st)
1982 National Indoor Champs: 200 yd. (1st)
1983 National Indoor Champs: 200 yd. (1st)
1975 Pan Am Games: 200 m - 22.77 (1st)

Education
high school: Jacksonville (Jacksonville, Florida), 1974
undergraduate: Tennessee State (Nashville, Tennessee), 1978

Occupations
Coach

Ellery Clark

Inducted: 1991, athlete

Born: March 13, 1874 - East Roxbury, Massachusetts
Deceased: February 17, 1949

Events
Decathlon - 6318 pts.


Versatile in both his athletic and professional lives, Ellery Clark was a double gold medalist at the first modern Olympic Games in 1896. At the Olympic revival in Athens, Clark won both the high jump and long jump. He is still the only person to ever win those events in the same Olympics. He never won a national championship in either jump, but he was the 1897 and 1903 AAU champion in the all-around, a forerunner of the decathlon. His performance in 1903 followed two years when he was forced from the sport by torn knee ligaments. At age 30, Clark made his second Olympic appearance at the 1904 St. Louis Olympics, but bronchitis limited him to a sixth place finish in the all-around competition. A Harvard graduate, Clark was one of the nation's top all-around athletes from 1893 to 1912 and competed as a race walker until the age of 56. Clark's professional life was equally varied. He excelled as a lawyer, track coach, teacher, Boston city alderman and author of 19 books, including one that was made into a 1952 film, Caribbean.

Championships
1896 Olympics: High Jump (1st)
1896 Olympics: Long Jump (1st)
1904 Olympics: Decathlon (6th)
1897 AAU: Decathlon (1st)
1903 AAU: Decathlon (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Harvard (Cambridge, Massachusetts), 1897

Occupations
Author
Attorney
Coach
Politician
Teacher

Alice Coachman (Davis)

Photo of Alice Coachman (Davis)

Inducted: 1975, athlete

Born: November 9, 1923 - Albany, Georgia

Events
High Jump - 1.68 m


Alice Coachman achieved her greatest fame in 1948 when she won the Olympic high jump title in an Olympic and American record of 5' 6 1/8", thus becoming the first black woman to win an Olympic gold medal. Her only Olympic opportunity came late, since prior competition was restricted by World War II. Coachman nonetheless won 25 national titles, most of them in the high jump where she won 10 consecutive titles from 1939 to 1948. A fine sprinter, she won the outdoor 50m dash from 1943 through 1947, the outdoor 100 meters in 1942, 1945 and 1946, and the indoor 50m dash in 1945 and 1946. Coachman also ran anchor on Tuskegee Institute's national champion 4x100m relay teams in 1941 and 1942. After Coachman won her first national championship in the high jump at age 16, Tuskegee Institute coach Cleve Abbott asked her to join his team. The following year, though still a high schooler, she moved from Albany, Ga., to Tuskegee, where fellow Hall of Famer Abbott became her coach. She later attended both Tuskegee Institute and Albany State in Georgia and after her competitive days became a schoolteacher and coach.

Records Held
Olympic Record: High Jump - 1.68 m (August 7, 1948 - )
American Record: High Jump - 1.68 m (August 7, 1948 - )

Championships
1948 Olympics: High Jump - 1.68 m (1st)
1939 National Championships: High Jump (1st)
1940 National Championships: High Jump (1st)
1941 National Championships: High Jump (1st)
1942 National Championships: High Jump (1st)
1942 US Outdoors: 100 m (1st)
1943 National Champs: High Jump (1st)
1943 US Outdoors: 50 m (1st)
1944 National Championships: High Jump (1st)
1944 US Outdoors: 50 m (1st)
1945 National Championships: High Jump (1st)
1945 US Indoors: 50 m (1st)
1945 US Outdoors: 50 m (1st)
1945 US Outdoors: 100 m (1st)
1946 National Championships: High Jump (1st)
1946 US Indoors: 50 m (1st)
1946 US Outdoors: 50 m (1st)
1946 US Outdoors: 100 m (1st)
1947 National Championships: High Jump (1st)
1947 US Outdoors: 50 m (1st)
1948 National Championships: High Jump (1st)
1941 NCAA: 400 m relay (1st)
1942 NCAA: 400 m relay (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Tuskegee Institute (Tuskegee, Alabama)
undergraduate: Albany State (Albany, Georgia), 1946

Occupations
Schoolteacher
Coach

Harold Connolly

Photo of Harold Connolly

Inducted: 1984, athlete

Born: August 1, 1931 - Somerville, Massachusetts

Events
Hammer Throw - 71.26 m


In 1956, Connolly won the gold medal in the hammer throw at the Melbourne Olympics. Connolly represented the U.S. in three subsequent Olympics, finishing 8th in 1960 and 6th in 1964 before failing to qualify for the final in 1968. One of the greatest hammer throwers in track and field history, Harold Connolly was the 1956 Olympic champion who broke the world record seven times, helping to place the U.S. in the forefront of an event that historically had not been one of the nation's best. A graduate of Boston College, Connolly won 12 national titles, including nine in the hammer outdoors and three indoors with the 35-pound weight throw. While at Boston College, Connolly took up the event to strengthen his left arm, which was slightly withered at birth and weakened from injuries in football and wrestling. By 1955, he became the first American to surpass 200 feet, throwing 201' 5". That was just the beginning of his record-setting exploits. He gained his first world record with a throw of 224' 10", shortly before the 1956 Olympics. Wearing ballet shoes to improve his footing in the concrete ring, he beat long-time world record holder Mikhail Krivonosov to win the gold medal. Besides 1956, he also was a member of the 1960, 1964 and 1968 Olympic teams, but it was in 1956 that Connolly grabbed world attention when he met Olga Fikatova, the Olympic women's discus champion from Czechoslovakia. A romance developed and they were married in October 1957. They divorced in 1975 but a son by that marriage, Jim, later became an outstanding decathlon competitor at UCLA. Connolly subsequently married the former Pat Winslow, a three-time Olympian in the 800 meters and pentathlon. Their youngest son, Adam, carried on his father's tradition, ranking third among U.S. hammer throwers in 1999. After retiring from competition, Hal Connolly became a schoolteacher, manager of Special Olympics International, and publisher of a web site to promote his event, hammerthrow.org.

Records Held
World Record: Hammer Throw - 68.54 m
World Record: Hammer Throw - 71.26 m (June 20, 1975 - )

Championships
1956 Olympics: Hammer Throw (1st)
1960 Olympics: Hammer Throw (8th)
1964 Olympics: Hammer Throw (6th)
1968 Olympics: Hammer Throw

Education
undergraduate: Boston College (Boston, Massachusetts), 1952

Occupations
Schoolteacher
Coach
Administrator for Special Olympics
Author
Publisher of hammerthrow.com

Lillian Copeland

Inducted: 1994, athlete

Born: November 25, 1904 - New York, New York
Deceased: February 7, 1964

Events
Discus Throw - 40.60 m
Javelin Throw - 38.30 m


A world or American record holder in three throwing events, Lillian Copeland was only a part-time competitor in 1932, when the Olympics were held in Los Angeles. As a student at the University of Southern California, she took time away from her studies to prepare for the Trials. There, she finished third in the discus, before winning the gold medal at the Games on her final throw. The first great American woman weight thrower, Copeland won nine national AAU titles in three events. She was the shot put champion from 1925 through 1928 and again in 1931, the discus champion in 1926 and 1927, and the javelin champion in 1926 and 1931. Copeland set world records in the javelin in 1926, 1927 and 1928, but neither that event nor the shot was on the Olympic program. However, she did win a silver medal in the 1928 Amsterdam Olympics. Four years later, she won gold in that event with an Olympic record of 133' 2". Amazingly quick for a weight thrower, she was a member of a 440-yard relay team that set a national record in 1928. Copeland worked for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department and was a juvenile officer for 24 years.

Records Held
World Record: Javelin Throw - 38.30 m (February 26, 1927 - )
American Record: Discus Throw - 40.60 m (August 2, 1932 - )

Championships
1925 AAU: Shot Put (1st)
1926 AAU: Shot Put (1st)
1926 AAU: Discus Throw (1st)
1926 AAU: Javelin Throw (1st)
1927 AAU: Discus Throw (1st)
1927 AAU: Shot Put (1st)
1928 AAU: Shot Put (1st)
1931 AAU: Shot Put (1st)
1931 AAU: Javelin Throw (1st)

Education
undergraduate: University of Southern California (Los Angeles, California)

Occupations
Juvenile officer, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department

Tom Courtney

Photo of Tom Courtney

Inducted: 1978, athlete

Born: August 17, 1933 - Newark, New Jersey

Events
800 yd. - 1:46.80
800 m - 1:46.40


An extremely strong runner, Tom Courtney came into national prominence while a student at Fordham University, winning the IC4A indoor 1000-yard run in 1954 and the NCAAA outdoor 880-yard title in 1955, as well as running the anchor leg on Fordham's outstanding 4x800 relay team. Courtney's career peaked in 1956 when he set an American record of 1:46.4 in the 800 meters at the Olympic Trials, then won one of the closest, most dramatic races in Olympic history by outleaning Great Britain's Derek Johnson to win the 800 meters. Courtney later wrote: "It was a new kind of agony for me....The only thing I could think was, 'If I live, I will never run again.'" He returned during the same Olympics to anchor the winning U.S. 4x400m relay team. A two-time National AAU champion at 880 yards and once at 440 yards, Courtney also held world indoor bests for the 600-yard and 880-yard races.

Records Held
World Record: 800 yd. - 1:46.80 (May 24, 1957 - )
American Record: 800 m - 1:46.40

Championships
1956 Olympics: 800 m (1st)
1956 Olympics: 1,600 m relay (1st)
1955 NCAA: 880 yd. (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Fordham (Bronx, New York), 1955

Dean Cromwell

Photo of Dean Cromwell

Inducted: 1974, coach

Born: September 20, 1879 - Turner, Oregon
Deceased: August 3, 1962


Career Highlights

  • As track coach, Cromwell's teams at University of Southern California won 12 national collegiate titles, including nine in a row.

Nicknamed "Maker of Champions," Dean Cromwell was the head coach at the University of Southern California for 39 years, developing a track and field heritage that still exists. Cromwell participated in track and field and played baseball and football at Occidental College, from which he graduated in 1902. After working for the telephone company for seven years, he became head track and football coach at USC in 1909. Over the next 39 years, his track teams won 12 NCAA championship, including 9 in a row from 1935 through 1943. They also won 9 IC4A titles. From 1939 through 1948, USC lost only three dual meets. During his tenure, USC athletes won national college titles and 38 National AAU crowns. They also set 14 individual world records plus three more in the relays. He coached 10 Olympic gold medal winners, including at least one at every Olympics from 1912 through 1948, and had 36 U.S. Olympic team members. Among his athletes were such fellow Hall of Famers as Charlie Paddock, Bud Houser, Mel Patton, Vern Wolfe and Frank Wykoff. Cromwell retired in 1948 after coaching the U.S. Olympic team to 10 gold medals.

Education
undergraduate: Occidental (Los Angeles, California), 1902

Occupations
Coach

Glenn Cunningham

Photo of Glenn Cunningham

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: August 4, 1909 - Atlanta, Kansas
Deceased: March 10, 1988

Events
800 m - 1:49.70
1,500 m - 3:48.00
1 mi. - 4:04.40


An athlete who survived severe burns on his legs as a youth, Glenn Cunningham was one of the world's top middle distance runners during the 1930s, winning the prestigious Sullivan Award in 1933 as the nation's top amateur athlete. Cunningham first came to national attention as a senior at Elkhart (Kan.) High School, when he won mile titles at the Kansas Relays, state outdoor and National Interscholastic Meet, where he set a world prep record of 4:24.7. At Kansas University, he won six Big-6 mile runs, two NCAA titles and eight AAU national titles. His durability and versatility earned him the nickname, "Kansas Ironman." After winning the national collegiate and AAU championships in 1932, he placed fourth in the 1500 meters at the Los Angeles Olympics. He was even more successful in 1933, sweeping the 800 and 1500 meter runs at the AAU nationals, touring Europe and completing the season with an undefeated record in 20 races. The following year, he set a world one-mile record of 4:06.8 that stood for three years. At the 1936 Berlin Olympics, he finished second to Jack Lovelock of New Zealand in the 1500 meters. Two weeks later, he set a world record of 1:49.7 in the 800 meters. He was virtually unbeatable indoors, winning six Wanamaker Miles at the Millrose Games and being named the outstanding track and field performer in the history of Madison Square Garden. Seven times, he set world indoor records for the 1500 and the mile. In 1938, running on Dartmouth College's oversized track, he set a world indoor mile record of 4:04.4, surpassing the outdoor record by a full two seconds. After earning a master's degree from the University of Iowa and a doctorate from New York University, Cunningham retired from competition in 1940 and for four years was director of physical education at Cornell College in Iowa. He and his wife later opened the Glenn Cunningham Youth Ranch in Kansas, where they helped to raise about 10,000 underprivileged children.

Records Held
World Record: 800 m - 1:49.70 (August 20, 1936 - )
World Record: 1 mi. - 4:06.80 (June 16, 1934 - )
World Record: 1 mi. - 4:04.40 (March 3, 1938 - )

Championships
1932 Olympics: 1,500 m (4th)
1936 Olympics: 1,500 m (2nd)
1932 AAU: 1,500 m (1st)
1933 AAU: 800 m (1st)
1933 AAU: 1,500 m (1st)
1932 NCAA: 1,500 m (1st)

Education
high school: Elkhart (Elkhart, Kansas), 1930
undergraduate: Kansas (Lawrence, Kansas), 1934

Occupations
Director of physical education
Rancher

William Curtis

Inducted: 1979, contributor

Born: January 17, 1837 - Salisbury, Vermont
Deceased: June 30, 1900


William "Father Bill" Curtis was one of the prime movers behind the development of track and field in the U.S. A free-lance writer and a versatile athlete, Curtis in 1866 became the guiding spirit behind the New York Athletic Club. The club officially got underway in 1868 and it held New York City's first indoor meet on November 11 at the Empire City Skating Rink. One of the first winners in that meet was Curtis, who ran the 75-yard dash in 9.0. On that occasion, he became the first athlete to wear spiked shoes on an American track team although they were in common use in England. Curtis was used to winning. From 1852 to 1872, he took on all comers in the 100-yard dash and never lost a race. He also was a three-time National AAU champion in the hammer throw and earned another title in the 56-pound weight throw. A colorful writer, Curtis went on to become publisher of the city's foremost sports newspaper.

Occupations
Free-lance writer
Editor

Willie Davenport

Photo of Willie Davenport

Inducted: 1982, athlete

Born: June 8, 1943 - Troy, Alabama
Deceased: June 18, 2002

Events
110 m hurdles - 13.20


A four-time competitor at the Summer Olympic Games as a high hurdler, Willie Davenport achieved a unique distinction in 1980 by becoming one of the few athletes to ever compete in both Summer and Winter Olympic Games. That year, Davenport competed in the Winter Olympics as a bobsledder but did not place. His Olympic credentials on the track were far more impressive. He won the gold medal in the 110m hurdles at the 1968 Olympics with a meet record of 13.3 and in other Olympic appearances he failed to make the final in 1964, was fourth in 1972 and third in 1976. After an outstanding athletic career at Howland High School, Davenport joined the U.S. Army and became a member of its track team. As a PFC in 1964, he was the surprise winner in the 110m hurdles at the Olympic Trials and suddenly became the favorite for the gold medal in Tokyo. However, he incurred a thigh injury and failed to advance beyond the semi-finals. The next three years, he was national champion in the 110m hurdles and won the gold medal at the 1968 Olympics. He tied the world record of 13.2 at Zurich, Switzerland, on July 4, 1969. Davenport was equally formidable indoors, winning the national championship in the 60-yard hurdles five times, in 1966 and 1967 and from 1969 through 1971. After being discharged from the Army, he competed for Southern University in Louisiana. He subsequently returned to military duty and rose to the rank of Colonel in the Army National Guard. He coached the All-Army men's and women's track teams to an unprecedented four undefeated seasons from 1993 to 1996. At the time of his death in 2002, he was chief of the National Guard Bureau's Office of Sports Management.

Records Held
World Record: 110 m hurdles - 13.20 (July 4, 1969 - )

Championships
1964 Olympics: 110 m hurdles
1968 Olympics: 110 m hurdles (1st)
1972 Olympics: 110 m hurdles (4th)
1976 Olympics: 110 m hurdles (3rd)
1965 US Outdoors: 110 m hurdles (1st)
1966 US Indoors: 60 yd. hurdles (1st)
1966 US Outdoors: 110 m hurdles (1st)
1967 US Indoors: 60 yd. hurdles (1st)
1967 US Outdoors: 110 m hurdles (1st)
1969 US Indoors: 60 yd. hurdles (1st)
1970 US Indoors: 60 yd. hurdles (1st)
1971 US Indoors: 60 yd. hurdles (1st)

Education
high school: Howland (Warren, Ohio)
undergraduate: Southern (Baton Rouge, Louisiana), 1969

Occupations
U.S. Army officer
Coach

Glenn Davis

Photo of Glenn Davis

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: September 12, 1934 - Wellsburg, West Virginia

Events
200 m hurdles - 22.50
400 yd. hurdles - 49.90
400 m hurdles - 49.20
440 yd. - 45.70


A versatile, multi-talented athlete while at Ohio State University, Glenn Davis ran the 400m hurdles for the first time in 1956. It was a momentous debut. He won the AAU national championship, beating established star Josh Culbreath. At the Olympic Trials, he became the first athlete to break 50 seconds in the 400m hurdles, winning in a world record of 49.5. He capped his year by winning the event at the Melbourne Olympic in an Olympic record of 50.1. Four years later, in Rome, he became the first person to win the event for a second time, running 49.3 to surpass his own Olympic record. He won another gold medal as a member of the U.S. 4x400m relay team. Davis was a four-time AAU champion in the intermediate hurdles. An exceptional 400m-440-yard sprinter, Davis set a world record of 45.7 seconds in the 440-yard dash in 1958. That same year, he lowered his own world record in the 400m hurdles and set a world record of 49.9 in the 400-yard hurdles. He won the 1958 Sullivan Award as the top American amateur athlete. One of the rare times he ran the 200m hurdles, Davis set a world record of 22.5 in 1960. Coached by Hall of Famer Larry Snyder, Davis later played professional football for the Detroit Lions and Los Angeles Rams before becoming a track coach and restaurateur.

Records Held
World Record: 200 m hurdles - 22.50
World Record: 400 yd. hurdles - 49.90
World Record: 400 m hurdles - 49.20 (August 6, 1958 - )
World Record: 440 yd. - 45.70
Olympic Record: 400 m hurdles - 50.10
Olympic Record: 400 m hurdles - 49.30

Championships
1956 Olympics: 400 m hurdles - 50.10 (1st)
1960 Olympics: 400 m hurdles - 49.30 (1st)
1960 Olympics: 1,600 m relay (1st)
1956 AAU: 400 m hurdles (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Ohio State (Columbus, Ohio), 1959

Occupations
Professional football player
Coach
Restaurateur

Harold (Hal) Davis

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: January 5, 1921 - Salinas, California
Deceased: August 12, 2007

Events
100 m - 10.20
200 m - 20.40


World War II deprived Harold Davis of the international recognition that should have been his. During the early 1940s, Davis rightfully held the title "World's Fastest Human," winning just about every major sprint title over a four-year period. In 1941, Davis tied Jesse Owens' world 100m dash record of 10.2 while a student at Salinas Junior College under Hall of Fame coach Bud Winter. He then transferred to the University of California, where he was coached by another Hall of Famer, Brutus Hamilton. There, Davis won the national collegiate 100 and 220 yard titles in 1942 and 1943. Overall, he won the AAU 100 title three times and was a four-time champion in the AAU 200. Nicknamed the "California Comet," Davis first came to attention while in high school, where he ran the 100 yards in 9.7 and the 220 in 21.0. In one of his first major college races, the NCAA 100 yard dash final, he stumbled, fell to the ground, recovered and made up five to seven meters on the field in finishing fourth. Thereafter, the only major race he lost was in the 1941 AAU 100 meters where he was narrowly beaten by fellow Hall of Famer Barney Ewell. A poor starter, Davis had an extremely fast finish and was at his best in the longer 200 meter race, in which he ran 20.4 on a straight course and was twice timed in a wind-aided 20.2. In 1946, he sustained a serious hamstring injury and never again attained top form.

Records Held
World Record: 100 m - 10.20 (June 6, 1941 - )

Championships
1941 AAU: 100 m (2nd)
1942 NCAA: 100 yd. (1st)
1942 NCAA: 220 yd. (1st)
1943 NCAA: 100 yd. (1st)
1943 NCAA: 220 yd. (1st)

Education
junior college: Salinas (Salinas, California)
undergraduate: California (Berkeley, California), 1943

Bill Dellinger

Photo of Bill Dellinger

Inducted: 2000, athlete

Born: March 23, 1934 - Grants Pass, Oregon

Events
1,500 m - 3:41.50
2 mi. - 8:44
5,000 m - 13:49.80


Bill Dellinger was one of the greatest athlete-coaches ever produced by the state of Oregon. Though he knew little about running when he enrolled at the University of Oregon, he learned quickly under the tutelage of Hall of Fame coach Bill Bowerman. He became the first sophomore at Oregon to win the NCAA mile in 1954 and went on to win every collegiate cross-country race. In 1956, Dellinger lowered the American 5000m record three times and won the event at both the NCAAs and Olympic Trials. As a member of the Air Force in 1958, he set an American record of 3:41.5 in Budapest, Hungary. The following year, he won the 5000 meters at the Pan American Games as well as the AAU national indoor 3 mile run and the first of two consecutive AAU outdoor 5000 meters. He also set world indoor records of 8:49.9 for 2 miles and 13:37.0 for 3 miles. He made the U.S. Olympic team three times in the 5000 meters, winning a bronze medal in 1964 behind fellow American Bob Schul and France's Michel Jazy. After coaching in high school and junior college, he returned to Oregon in 1966 as cross country coach and became head track coach in 1973. Under his coaching, the Oregon Ducks won the 1984 NCAA outdoor track title and four NCAA cross country championships. Among the athletes he coached were Steve Prefontaine, Alberto Salazar, Rudy Chapa and Joaquin Cruz. He returned to the Olympics in 1984 as an assistant coach. He retired at the end of the 1998 cross country season but continued coaching in a consulting capacity. After suffering a stroke in 2000, he underwent rehabilitation and resumed coaching.

Records Held
World Record: 2 mi. - 8:50
World Record: 3 mi. - 13:37
American Record: 1,500 m - 3:41.50

Championships
1956 Olympics: 5,000 m
1960 Olympics: 5,000 m
1964 Olympics: 5,000 m - 13:49.80 (3rd)
1959 AAU Indoor: 3 mi. (1st)
1959 AAU Outdoor: 5,000 m (1st)
1960 AAU Outdoor: 5,000 m (1st)
1959 Pan Am Games: 5,000 m (1st)
1954 NCAA: 1 mi. (1st)
1956 NCAA: 5,000 m (1st)

Education
high school: Springfield (Springfield, Oregon), 1952
undergraduate: Oregon (Eugene, Oregon), 1956

Occupations
Coach

Mildred (Babe) Didriksen

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: June 26, 1914 - Beaumont, Texas
Deceased: September 27, 1956

Events
High Jump - 1.65 m
Javelin Throw - 43.68 m
80 m hurdles - 11.70


Named the top woman athlete in the first half of the 20th century, Babe Didriksen dominated every sport in which she participated -- including track and field. After starring for her undefeated high school basketball team, she was recruited to work for Employers Casualty Insurance Co. and play for the company team. She was an immediate success and was named an All-American in her first season. The company also had a track and field team and Didriksen quickly took it by storm, winning two national AAU titles within a month of competing in her first meet. In 1931, she was a one-woman show, scoring three victories, all with American record performances, in the 80-meter hurdles, long jump, and baseball throw. Bigger things awaited her. At the 1932 National AAU Championships, Didriksen entered herself as a team, won six of the eight contested events, and finished first overall, ahead of the 22-woman team from the University of Illinois. Olympic rules limited women from competing in more than three events, so Babe settled for two golds and a silver at the 1932 Games. In the 80-meter hurdles she narrowly defeated fellow American (and Hall of Famer) Evelyne Hall in world-best time of 11.7. She set an Olympic record of 143' 4" in winning the javelin. Her defeat in the high jump was controversial, since she cleared the same height as winner (and Hall of Famer) Jean Shiley, but the jump was declared illegal because she dove over the bar. Didriksen eventually became a legendary golfer, winning 82 amateur and professional tournaments overall, including 17 consecutive championships in 1946-47. Didriksen was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1983. Her last name is sometimes spelled "Didrikson" but Didriksen is the name on her birth certificate.

Records Held
World Record: High Jump - 1.65 m (August 7, 1932 - )
World Record: 80 m hurdles - 11.70 (August 4, 1932 - )
American Record: Javelin Throw - 43.70 m (July 31, 1932 - )

Championships
1932 Olympics: Javelin Throw - 43.70 m (1st)
1932 Olympics: High Jump - 1.65 m (2nd)
1932 Olympics: 80 m hurdles - 11.70 (1st)

Education
high school: Beaumont (Beaumont, Texas), 1930

Occupations
Professional Golfer

Harrison Dillard

Photo of Harrison Dillard

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: July 8, 1923 - Cleveland, Ohio

Events
100 m - 10.30
120 yd. hurdles - 13.60
110 m hurdles - 13.70


Harrison Dillard is the only man to ever win Olympic gold medals in both the sprints and high hurdles. Overall, he won four Olympic gold medals, also taking two in the 4x100 relays in 1948 and 1952. When Dillard was 13 years old, he attended a parade in Cleveland honoring triple-gold-medalist Jesse Owens upon his return from the 1936 Olympics. Dillard later met Owens, who presented him with his first pair of running shoes. Known as "Bones" because of his spindly size, Dillard attended Baldwin-Wallace College in Berea, Ohio, where he won four national collegiate titles in the high and low hurdles. He also took 14 AAU outdoor titles in the high and low hurdles and lost the opportunity for more because of the outbreak of World War II. After winning 82-straight hurdles races, Dillard failed to make the 1948 Olympic team as a hurdler but qualified in the 100 meters. In London, he outleaned the favored Barney Ewell of the U.S. to win the gold medal. Four years later, he won the gold medal in his trademark event, the 110m hurdles, narrowly beating American Jack Davis. An outstanding starter, Dillard was virtually unbeatable indoors, winning the AAU 60-yard hurdles seven years in a row from 1947 through 1953 and again in 1955. A world record holder in both the high and low hurdles, Dillard won the 1953 Sullivan Award as the nation's top amateur athlete.

Records Held
World Record: 120 yd. hurdles - 13.60 (April 17, 1948 - )
Olympic Record: 100 m - 10.30 (July 31, 1948 - )

Championships
1948 Olympics: 100 m - 10.30 (1st)
1948 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1952 Olympics: 110 m hurdles - 13.70 (1st)
1952 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1947 AAU: 60 yd. hurdles (1st)
1948 AAU: 60 yd. hurdles (1st)
1949 AAU: 60 yd. hurdles (1st)
1950 AAU: 60 yd. hurdles (1st)
1951 AAU: 60 yd. hurdles (1st)
1952 AAU: 60 yd. hurdles (1st)
1953 AAU: 60 yd. hurdles (1st)
1955 AAU: 60 yd. hurdles (1st)

Education
high school: East Tech (Cleveland, Ohio), 1941
undergraduate: Baldwin Wallace College (Berea, Ohio)

Occupations
Public relations

Ken Doherty

Photo of Ken Doherty

Inducted: 1976, athlete

Born: May 16, 1905 - Detroit, Michigan
Deceased: April 17, 1996

Events
Decathlon - 6593 pts.


John Kenneth "Ken" Doherty used the skills he developed as an Olympic decathlon competitor to become one of the top track coaches in the world. In 1928, Doherty won the Olympic Decathlon Trials and although not highly regarded at Amsterdam, he came up with a third-place finish. A graduate of Wayne State University in Detroit, Doherty won a second AAU national decathlon title in 1929, setting an American record. He entered coaching and from 1939 to 1948 was head coach at the University of Michigan, winning nine Big Ten team titles. He then moved to the University of Pennsylvania, where he coached until 1961, also directing the Penn Relays, the first USA-USSR dual track meet and the Philadelphia Inquirer indoor meet. After retiring from coaching, Doherty excelled as a writer of instructional books, such as Modern Track and Field and Track and Field Omnibook. He was also a major contributor to the Hall of Fame Library at Butler University, which subsequently became the National Track & Field Research Collection of the Amateur Athletic Foundation of Los Angeles. An annual fellowship in Doherty's name is administered by the AAFLA.

Championships
1928 Olympics: Decathlon (3rd)
1929 AAU: Decathlon (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Wayne State (Detroit, Michigan)

Occupations
Coach
Meet director
Writer

Charles Dumas

Photo of Charles Dumas

Inducted: 1990, athlete

Born: February 12, 1937 - Inglewood, California
Deceased: January 5, 2004

Events
High Jump - 2.15 m


On June 29, 1956, Charles Dumas sent a shock through the track and field world when he became the first person to jump seven feet. His clearance of 7' 0 1/2" at the Olympic Trials broke a major human barrier. A straddler with a very smooth technique, Dumas went on to win the gold medal in the event with an Olympic record of 6' 11 1/4". From 1955 to 1959, Dumas won or shared five-straight national high jump titles and was ranked first in the world twice during that period. In 1959, he captured the gold medal at the Pan American Games. Also an excellent hurdler, Dumas starred at both Compton Junior College and the University of Southern California. After finishing sixth at the 1960 Olympic Games, he made a comeback in 1964, cleared 7' 0 1/4" and ranked sixth in the nation. But after failing to make the 1964 Olympic team, he retired and later became a teacher.

Records Held
World Record: High Jump - 2.15 m (June 29, 1956 - )
Olympic Record: High Jump - 2.11 m

Championships
1956 Olympics: High Jump - 2.11 m (1st)
1960 Olympics: High Jump (6th)
1955 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1956 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1957 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1958 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1959 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1959 Pan-Am Games: High Jump (1st)

Education
high school: Centennial (Los Angeles, California)
junior college: Compton (Compton, California)
undergraduate: University of Southern California (Los Angeles, California), 1959

Occupations
Teacher

Millard (Bill) Easton

Photo of Millard (Bill) Easton

Inducted: 1975, coach

Born: September 13, 1906 - Stinesville, Indiana
Deceased: October 7, 1997


Career Highlights

  • Easton won six NCAA titles at two different universities – Drake and Kansas

Millard "Bill" Easton built a reputation as one of the nation's best coaches at two universities -- Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa, and the University of Kansas. During a coaching career that spanned three decades, Easton produced 32 All-Americans and eight Olympians. Three of those were also Olympic champions and world record holders -- shot putter Bill Nieder, discus thrower Al Oerter and distance runner Billy Mills. As coach at Drake from 1941 through 1947, Easton produced three consecutive NCAA champion cross-country teams, from 1944 through 1946. He also served as director of the famed Drake Relays while he was there. He then moved to Kansas and in the 1950s his Jayhawk teams won the Big Eight cross country, indoor and outdoor track team titles eight years in a tow. His teams won the 1953 national collegiate cross country title and the 1959 and 1960 NCAA outdoor track titles. Before his retirement in 1965, his teams won 39 Big Eight conference championships in cross country and track. He subsequently coached the 1968 Mexican Olympic team. A graduate of Indiana University, Easton was coached by fellow Hall of Famer Billy Hayes.

Education
undergraduate: Indiana (Bloomington, Indiana)

Occupations
Coach

James (Jumbo) Elliot

Photo of James (Jumbo) Elliot

Inducted: 1981, coach

Born: August 8, 1915 - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Deceased: March 22, 1981


One of the most successful track coaches in the world while at Villanova University, James "Jumbo" Ellliott excelled at getting his athletes ready for the big meets, whether they were the Penn Relays or IC4A Championships, which his teams dominated for years, or the Olympic Games, for which he produced 28 competitors. As a student at Villanova, Elliott ran in the 220, 440, and 880-yard events. After he graduated in 1935, he became the school's part-time track coach while working for a company that sold contracting equipment. From 1949, when he took over at Villanova, until his death in 1981, Elliott achieved a coaching record that will be hard to duplicate. During that span, his teams won eight national collegiate team titles, three National AAU team crowns, and 39 IC4A indoor, outdoor and cross country championships. Individually, his athletes won 316 IC4A titles, 82 NCAA crowns and 62 National AAU championships. They set 22 world records outdoors and another 44 indoors. His Olympic gold medalists were Ron Delany in the 1956 1500m, Charles Jenkins in the 400, also in 1956, Don Bragg in the 1960 pole vault, Paul Drayton in the 1964 4x100m relay and Larry James in the 1968 4x400m relay. He is best known for developing outstanding distance runners, including Delaney, Marty Liquori, Eamonn Coghlan, and Sydney Maree.

Education
undergraduate: Villanova (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 1935

Occupations
Coach
Businessman

Larry Ellis

Inducted: 1999, coach

Born: September 29, 1929 - Englewood, New Jersey
Deceased: November 4, 1998


Career Highlights

  • Under Ellis' direction, the Princeton Tigers won eight of nine Heptagonal Cross Country Championships between 1975 and 1983.

An inspirational coach for 13 years at Jamaica (N.Y.) High School, Ellis moved to Princeton University in 1970 where he was head coach for 22 years. Among the star athletes he coached were Bob Beamon, former world record holder in the long jump, and Craig Masback, an outstanding miler/1500m runner who is now Chief Executive Officer of USATF. Under Ellis' tutelage, Princeton won 11 Heptagonal team titles in track plus another eight in cross country. He received Coach of the Year honors for 1981-82. In 1984, Ellis guided the men's Olympic team that included Carl Lewis, winner of four gold medals at the Los Angeles Games. He coached U.S. men's teams at four other international meets, including a squad that beat the Soviet Union in a memorable dual meet in 1978. He served USATF in many capacities and was the organization's president from 1992 to 1996. An outstanding middle distance runner at New York University, he was third in the 1951 NCAA 800m and in 1950 won the Canadian indoor 1000-yard title.

Education
undergraduate: New York (New York, New York), 1951

Occupations
Coach

Lee Evans

Inducted: 1983, athlete

Born: February 25, 1947 - Madera, California

Events
400 m - 43.86


On October 18, 1968, Lee Evans was one of two Americans to set astonishing world records at the Mexico City Olympics. Within an hour of Bob Beamon's titanic achievement in the long jump, Evans became the first person to break 44 seconds in the 400 meters. His world-record time of 43.86 would endure for 20 years. He also ran on the winning 1968 Olympic 4x400m relay team that clocked 2:56.1, once again a time that stood as a world record for 20 years. Evans was undefeated during his track career at Overfelt High School in San Jose, Calif., improving his 440-yard time from 48.2 in 1964 to 46.9 in 1965. He attended San Jose State, where he was coached by Hall of Famer Bud Winter. As a freshman, he won his first AAU championship in 1966 and improved his 400m time to an impressive 45.2. For several years, he was the world's top runner at 400 meters and 440 yards, losing only to fellow Hall of Famer Tommie Smith in 1967. He was AAU champion from 1966 to 1969 and again in 1972. Evans also was the 1967 Pan American Games champion. He finished fourth in the 400 meters at the 1972 Olympic Trials, but was included on the 4x400m relay team. He became a professional in 1973 but was reinstated in 1980. Following his graduation, he served as head cross country and assistant track coach at San Jose State before beginning an international coaching career. Between 1975 and 1997 Evans directed the national track and field programs of Nigeria and Saudi Arabia and trained athletes in 18 other countries. In 1977, he was the sprint coach for the All-African team at the first World Cup and earned coach of the year honors in Nigeria that year. In 2002, Evans joined the coaching staff of the University of Washington, working primarily with the men's and women's sprinters and relay team members.

Records Held
World Record: 400 m - 43.86 (October 18, 1968 - )
World Record: 1,600 m relay - 2:56.10

Championships
1968 Olympics: 400 m - 43.86 (1st)
1968 Olympics: 1,600 m relay (1st)
1966 AAU: 400 m (1st)
1967 AAU: 400 m (1st)
1968 AAU: 400 m (1st)
1969 AAU: 400 m (1st)
1972 Olympic Trials: 400 m (4th)
1967 Pan-Am Games: 400 m (1st)

Education
high school: Overfelt (San Jose, California)
junior college: San Jose CC
undergraduate: San Jose State (San Jose, California), 1970

Occupations
Coach

Norwood Barney Ewell

Photo of Norwood Barney Ewell

Inducted: 1986, athlete

Born: February 25, 1918 - Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Deceased: April 4, 1996

Events
100 m - 10.20


While in high school, Barney Ewell won the U.S. junior sprint title before going on to an outstanding career at Penn State, winning back-to-back NCAA 100-200m titles in 1940 and 1941. He also won both sprints at the IC4A meet for three consecutive years, from 1940 to 1942. Between 1939 and 1948, Ewell won six national sprint titles, three in the 100 meters and three in the 200 meters. After World War II prompted the cancellation of the 1940 and 1944 Olympics, Ewell finally got his opportunity to compete in the 1948 Games, at age 30. At the 1948 AAU championships, which served as the Olympic trials, Ewell tied the world record of 10.2 in the 100-meter dash and arrived in London as favorite in that event. Running in the final of the 100 meters, he thought he had won, only to learn that he had lost in a photo finish to teammate Harrison Dillard. In the 200, Ewell had another close finish and again placed second, this time to teammate Mel Patton. He was added to the 4x100m relay when Ed Conwell became sick and the U.S. raced to an easy victory. However, the exchange between Ewell and Lorenzo Wright was ruled out of the zone and the U.S. was disqualified. The ruling was later reversed, and Barney Ewell finally had his Olympic gold medal. During his track and field career, Ewell also excelled in the long jump, winning the event three times at the IC4A outdoor meet (1940-1942); twice at the IC4A indoor meet (1940 and 1942); and twice at the AAU indoor meet (1944-1945).

Records Held
World Record: 100 m - 10.20 (July 9, 1948 - )

Championships
1948 Olympics: 100 m (2nd)
1948 Olympics: 200 m (2nd)
1948 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1944 AAU Indoors: Long Jump (1st)
1945 AAU Indoors: Long Jump (1st)
1948 AAU: 100 m - 10.20 (1st)
1940 NCAA: 100 m (1st)
1940 NCAA: 200 m (1st)
1941 NCAA: 100 m (1st)
1941 NCAA: 200 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Penn State (State College, Pennsylvania), 1947

Occupations
Electrical company worker

Ray Ewry

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: October 14, 1873 - Lafayette, Indiana
Deceased: September 29, 1937

Events
High Jump - 1.65 m
Long Jump - 3.47 m
Triple Jump - 10.58 m


No one in Olympic history won more gold medals than Ray Ewry, a former Purdue University athlete who accumulated his record total of 10 in four Olympiads. He won three golds apiece in 1900 and 1904 and two each in 1906 and 1908. All of them came in events no longer contested -- the standing long jump, standing high jump and standing triple jump. However, that should not detract from the impressiveness of his feat. Nicknamed "The Human Frog" for his incredible leaping ability, Ewry was a 15-time national champion in the standing events from 1898 to 1910. He undoubtedly would have earned more titles if the standing jumps had not been dropped from the AAU program for a six-year period. Confined to a wheelchair by polio when he was a boy, Ewry exercised his legs until he could walk, then increased their strength through his jumping regimen. In 1890, he entered Purdue University, where he played football and captained the track team. A hydraulics engineer by profession, he competed until he was almost 40; at age 39, he made a bid for the 1912 Olympic team but fell short. He was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1983.

Records Held
World Record: Standing High Jump - 1.65 m (July 16, 1900 - )
World Record: Standing Long Jump - 3.47 m (September 3, 1904 - )

Championships
1900 Olympics: Standing High Jump (1st)
1900 Olympics: Standing Long Jump (1st)
1900 Olympics: Standing Triple Jump (1st)
1904 Olympics: Standing High Jump (1st)
1904 Olympics: Standing Long Jump (1st)
1904 Olympics: Standing Triple Jump (1st)
1906 Olympics: Standing High Jump (1st)
1906 Olympics: Standing Long Jump (1st)
1908 Olympics: Standing High Jump (1st)
1908 Olympics: Standing Long Jump (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Purdue (West Lafayette, Indiana), 1896

Occupations
Hydraulics engineer

Mae Faggs

Photo of Mae Faggs

Inducted: 1976, athlete

Born: April 10, 1932 - Mays Landing, New Jersey
Deceased: January 27, 2000

Events
100 yd. - 10.70
200 m - 24.20


A three-time Olympian, Heriwentha (Mae) Faggs was a gold medalist at the 1952 Olympics when she ran on the 4x100m relay team that set a world record of 45.9 Her running experience began at age 15 after she was recruited to run as a member of the New York City Police Athletic League. A year later, she qualified to represent the U.S. in the 200 meters at the London Olympics. After graduating from Bayside High School in New York, she became Hall of Fame coach Ed Temple's first recruited athlete at Tennessee State University. While running for the Tigerbelles, she qualified for her second Olympic team in both the 100 meters, in which she finished sixth, and the 200 meters, in which she failed to qualify for the final. She ran the lead-off leg on the world-record setting 4x100m relay team. At the 1956 Olympics, she won a bronze medal in the 4x100m relay. At the 1955 Pan-American Games, she was also a gold medalist in the 4x100m relay team and took a silver medal in the 200 meters. She won 11 National AAU titles, six of them in the indoor 220-yard sprint. After retiring, Faggs became a schoolteacher.

Records Held
World Record: 400 m relay - 45.90
American Record: 200 m - 24.20 (August 15, 1956 - )

Championships
1952 Olympics: 100 m (6th)
1952 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1956 Olympics: 400 m relay (3rd)
1955 Pan-Am Games: 200 m (2nd)
1955 Pan-Am Games: 400 m relay (1st)

Education
high school: Bayside (Bayside, New York)
undergraduate: Tennessee State (Nashville, Tennessee), 1956

Occupations
Teacher

Barbara Ferrell

Inducted: 1988, athlete

Born: July 28, 1947 - Hattiesburg, Mississippi

Events
100 m - 11.10


One of the world's top women sprinters in the late 1960s, Barbara Ferrell had her first major breakthrough in 1967 when she tied the world record of 11.1 for the 100m dash in winning the 1967 AAU national championship, won the gold medal in the 100m at the Pan American Games and was ranked number one in the U.S. in both the 100 and 200. In 1968, she tied her 100m world record in the semi-finals at the Olympic Games, then finished second in the final to Hall of Famer Wyomia Tyus. She also finished fourth in the 200 meters and was a member of the gold-medal winning 4x100m relay. Running for California State University and the Los Angeles Mercurettes, she was again ranked first in the U.S. at both 100 and 200 meters during 1969. That year, she won the national outdoor 100 and 220-yard dash at the outdoor national championships as well as the 60-yard dash and the rarely run 240-yard dash at the indoor championships. In 1972, she won the 100 meters at the Olympic trials but later was injured and failed to medal in the 100m or 200m dashes. She was an elementary school teacher in Los Angeles from 1968 to 1976 while pursuing a coaching career. She was head coach of the women's track and field team at the University of Southern California from 1992 to 1999 and in 2003 she became head coach of the University of Nevada at Las Vegas' track and cross country teams.

Records Held
World Record: 100 m - 11.10 (July 2, 1967 - )

Championships
1968 Olympics: 100 m (2nd)
1968 Olympics: 200 m (4th)
1968 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1972 Olympics: 100 m (7th)
1972 Olympics: 200 m (7th)
1967 AAU: 100 m - 11.10 (1st)
1969 AAU: 60 yd. (1st)
1969 AAU: 100 m (1st)
1969 AAU: 220 yd. (1st)
1969 AAU: 240 yd. (1st)
1967 Pan-Am Games: 100 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: California State University at Los Angeles (Los Angeles, California), 1969

Occupations
Teacher
Coach

Dan Ferris

Inducted: 1974, administrator

Born: November 12, 1889 - Pawling, New York
Deceased: May 2, 1977


A sprinter for the Irish-American A.C. in his competitive days, Daniel "Dan" Ferris joined the Amateur Athletic Union in 1907 as the personal secretary to another Hall of Famer, James Sullivan. When Sullivan stepped down in 1914, Ferris succeeded him as AAU secretary-treasurer and remained in the job for the next 43 years. Under his leadership, the AAU, which governed U.S. track and field during that period, thrived and instituted many programs that benefited the sport, including the Junior Olympics and the USA-USSR dual track meet series. Ferris attended every Olympic Games from 1912 through 1976, the year in which he stepped down from his post with the IAAF, the governing body of track and field.

Occupations
Track & field administrator

John Flanagan

Inducted: 1975, athlete

Born: January 9, 1873 - Kilbreedy, IR
Deceased: June 4, 1938

Events
Hammer Throw - 56.20 m


A native of Ireland, John Flanagan was one of the Irish-American "whales" who helped make the U.S. dominant in the weight events at the turn of the 20th century. Before emigrating to the United States in 1897, he set an unofficial world record of 147 feet in winning the 1896 British championship. Over the next decade, he improved his record several times, becoming the first to surpass 150 feet (in 1897), 160 feet (1899), 170 feet (1901) and 180 feet (1909). His final world record of 184' 4" was 37' 8" longer than his first and it made him the oldest athlete ever to break the world record in any track and field event. A three-time Olympian, he won gold medals in the hammer throw in 1900, 1904 and 1908 and silver medals in the 56-pound weight throw and the Tug of War. He also finished fourth in the discus in 1904. He was national AAU champion in the hammer throw from 1897 through 1899 and in 1901, 1902, 1906 and 1907. He also won the 56-pound weight competition five times. Like many of the great Irish-American weight throwers of his time, Flanagan became a New York City policeman. After retiring from the force in 1911, he returned to Ireland and coached two-time Olympic champion Dr. Patrick O'Callaghan.

Records Held
World Record: Hammer Throw - 56.18 m (July 24, 1909 - )

Championships
1900 Olympics: Hammer Throw (1st)
1904 Olympics: Hammer Throw (1st)
1904 Olympics: 56-pound Weight Throw (1st)
1904 Olympics: Discus Throw (4th)
1908 Olympics: Hammer Throw (1st)
1897 AAU: Hammer Throw (1st)
1898 AAU: Hammer Throw (1st)
1899 AAU: Hammer Throw (1st)
1901 AAU: Hammer Throw (1st)
1902 AAU: Hammer Throw (1st)
1906 AAU: Hammer Throw (1st)
1907 AAU: Hammer Throw (1st)

Occupations
Policeman

Dick Fosbury

Photo of Dick Fosbury

Inducted: 1981, athlete

Born: March 6, 1947 - Portland, Oregon

Events
High Jump - 2.24 m


As a high schooler in Medford, Ore., Dick Fosbury revolutionized the high jump when he developed a new technique that quickly became known as "the Fosbury Flop." The technique worked so well that Fosbury improved by one foot in high school -- from 5' 3 3/4" to 6' 3 3/4" -- after he first tried the "flop," which involving going over the bar headfirst and backward, with one's body horizontal to the ground. Great things were in store for him. At Oregon State University, Fosbury first cleared 7' during the 1968 indoor season and became a surprise winner at the Mexico City Olympics by clearing 7' 4 1/4" for Olympic and American records. Fosbury's experiments began with him using the antiquated jump style called the "scissors," until his high school coach pressed him to use the "straddle," or "belly roll," which was then the high-jumping norm. Failing to master the straddle, Fosbury reverted to a scissors, then modified by going over the bar backward. The "flop" was born. A two-time national collegiate champion, Fosbury made his record jump in Mexico City on his third attempt. He was top ranked in the world following his 1968 victory and in 1969 won the NCAA title before placing second in the National AAU meet. After he failed to make the 1972 Olympic team, he became a professional in 1973. He was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1992. After several years of controversy over whether the "Fosbury Flop" was safe, it became the standard jumping technique worldwide. Fosbury often gave clinics for young athletes, in which he explained that the "flop" involved landing safely on one's shoulders, not one's neck, as was commonly feared.

Records Held
Olympic Record: High Jump - 2.24 m (October 20, 1968 - )
American Record: High Jump - 2.24 m (October 20, 1968 - )

Championships
1968 Olympics: High Jump - 2.24 m (1st)
1969 AAU: High Jump (2nd)
1969 NCAA: High Jump (1st)

Education
high school: Medford (Medford, Oregon), 1965
undergraduate: Oregon State (Corvallis, Oregon), 1969

Occupations
Engineer

Greg Foster

Photo of Greg Foster

Inducted: 1998, athlete

Born: April 4, 1958 - Chicago, Illinois

Events
110 m hurdles - 13.03


Greg Foster was ranked among the top ten 110m hurdlers in the world 15 times, a record for a running event, and achieved the number-one ranking five times. He also won the first three World Outdoor Championships in the hurdles in 1983, 1987 and 1991. While at UCLA, Foster was a national collegiate champion in both the high hurdles and 200-meter dash. In 1979, he was world ranked in both events. After graduating from college in 1981, he won 10 national titles, both indoor and outdoor. The only major prize that eluded him was an Olympic gold medal. He came close in 1984, finishing second at the Los Angeles Games to Roger Kingdom of the U.S. In 1988, Foster broke his forearm prior to the Trials, competed nonetheless, but failed to gain a spot on the team. Four years later, at the 1992 Trials, he finished a non-qualifying fourth. Foster set world indoor hurdles records in 1986 and 1987. He was a member of 12 international teams, was the 1991 world indoor champion and the 1981 World Cup winner.

Championships
1984 Olympics: 110 m hurdles (2nd)
1983 World Outdoors: 110 m hurdles (1st)
1987 World Outdoors: 110 m hurdles (1st)
1991 World Indoors: 110 m hurdles (1st)
1991 World Outdoors: 110 m hurdles (1st)
1992 Olympic Trials: 110 m hurdles (4th)

Education
undergraduate: UCLA (Los Angeles, California), 1981

Bob Giegengack

Inducted: 1978, coach

Born: January 9, 1907 - Brooklyn, New York
Deceased: May 25, 1987


A college head track coach for 37 years, Bob Giegengack was the head coach of the 1964 U.S. Olympic team after serving as an assistant Olympic coach in 1956. His 1964 team won 20 medals, including 12 golds. Best known for producing outstanding middle distance runners, Giegengack was on the track team at Holy Cross College. After graduating in 1929, he coached track at the high school level for nine years. He took over at Fordham in 1938, becoming the youngest track coach at a major university. His 1941 team won the IC4A championship. After serving in the Navy, Giegengack returned to Fordham in 1945, before becoming track coach at Yale in 1946. He held that position until he retired in 1972. Giegengack guided Yale to four IC4A championships and a 186-121 record in dual and triangular meets. The Olympic athletes he coached included shot putter Jim Fuchs, sprinter Wendell Mottley and marathoner Frank Shorter, who is also in the Hall of Fame. Giegengack was very active on the U.S. Olympic Committee and twice served as chairman of that group's men's track and field committee.

Education
undergraduate: Holy Cross (Worcester, Massachusetts), 1929

Occupations
Coach

Fortune Gordien

Photo of Fortune Gordien

Inducted: 1979, athlete

Born: September 9, 1922 - Spokane, Washington
Deceased: April 10, 1990

Events
Discus Throw - 59.28 m


A veteran of three Olympic Games, Fortune Gordien dominated the discus throw for a decade during the late 1940s and early 1950s, improving the world record four times. While at the University of Minnesota, he won three national collegiate titles from 1946 through 1948. He was also AAU national discus champion six times, from 1947 through 1950 and again in 1953 and 1954. Gordien set his first world record in 1949 and improved it three times in a four-year period, capped by his throw of 194' 6" in 1953. This throw was the first to exceed 190' and continued to be the world record until 1959. The only feat that eluded him was winning an Olympic gold medal. He was third in 1948, fourth in 1952, and second (behind Hall of Famer Al Oerter) in 1956. Gordien was still throwing close to 190' at the age of 38 and threw in Masters competition at the age of 48 in 1971. He was also a world-class shot putter, finishing second in the national championships and third in the NCAA championships in 1947. A gifted amateur magician, Gordien later became a track coach and cattle rancher.

Records Held
World Record: Discus Throw - 59.28 m (August 22, 1953 - )

Championships
1948 Olympics: Discus Throw (3rd)
1952 Olympics: Discus Throw (4th)
1956 Olympics: Discus Throw (2nd)
1947 AAU: Discus Throw (1st)
1947 AAU: Shot Put (2nd)
1948 AAU: Discus Throw (1st)
1949 AAU: Discus Throw (1st)
1950 AAU: Discus Throw (1st)
1953 AAU: Discus Throw (1st)
1954 AAU: Discus Throw (1st)
1946 NCAA: Discus Throw (1st)
1947 NCAA: Discus Throw (1st)
1947 NCAA: Shot Put (3rd)
1948 NCAA: Discus Throw (1st)

Education
high school: Roosevelt (Minneapolis, Minnesota), 1944
undergraduate: Minnesota (Minneapolis, Minnesota), 1948

Occupations
Track coach
Cattle rancher

Charles Greene

Inducted: 1992, athlete

Born: March 21, 1944 - Pine Bluff, Arkansas

Events
100 m - 9.90


An outstanding sprinter for O'Dea High School in Seattle (9.5 for 100 yards in 1963), Greene developed into one of the world's top sprinters in the 1960s. Competing for the University of Nebraska, the 5' 8", 148-pound Greene won six national collegiate titles (three indoors, three outdoors) from 1965 to 1967. Considered a sure bet to make the 1964 team, Greene suffered muscle pulls that held him to a sixth place at the Olympic Trials. By 1968, however, Greene was back and better than ever, setting world records in both the 100 yards and 100 meters. At the 1968 Championships in Sacramento, Greene, fellow Hall of Famer Jim Hines, and Ronnie Ray Smith all made track history by dipping under 10 seconds with times of 9.9 seconds in their semi-finals. Dubbed "the Night of Speed" for its brilliant performances, the competition was capped by Greene's victory in the finals. At the 1968 Olympic Games, Greene was again bothered by injuries and finished third in the 100. Despite the injury, he led off the U.S. 4x100m relay team that won the gold medal and set a world record of 38.2 seconds. Following his athletic career, Greene became a career Army officer, serving as sprint coach at West Point and head coach of the All-Army team. After retiring with the rank of major, he became a director for Special Olympics International and is still active in the sport.

Records Held
World Record: 100 m - 9.90 (June 20, 1968 - )

Championships
1968 Olympics: 100 m (3rd)
1968 Olympics: 400 m relay - 38.20 (1st)
1965 NCAA Indoors: 60 yd. (1st)
1965 NCAA Outdoors: 100 yd. (1st)
1966 NCAA Indoors: 60 yd. (1st)
1966 NCAA Outdoors: 100 yd. (1st)
1967 NCAA Indoors: 60 yd. (1st)
1967 NCAA Outdoors: 100 yd. (1st)

Education
high school: O'Dea (Seattle, Washington)
undergraduate: Nebraska (Lincoln, Nebraska), 1967

Occupations
U.S. Army officer
Coach
Director of Special Olympics

John Griffith

Inducted: 1979, administrator

Born: - Carroll, Illinois
Deceased: December 7, 1944


Career Highlights

  • Griffith founded the Drake Relays in 1910.

Major John L. Griffith was appointed commissioner of what became known as the Big Ten Conference and for more than 20 years he helped to develop the conference into one of the finest in the U.S. A 1902 graduate of Beloit College in Wisconsin, Griffith six years later went to Drake University as athletic director, coach of the football and track team, and professor of history. In recognition of his various accomplishments, he was appointed Dean of Men in 1913. During this period, he founded the Drake Relays in 1910. The original event, held in a blizzard, attracted three universities and three high schools. Within five years, it was recognized as the third largest track and field event in the world, behind only the Penn Relays and the Olympic Games. After serving in World War I, he became head of the physical education program at the University of Illinois. While at Illinois in 1921, Griffith collaborated with famed football coach Amos Alonzo Stagg and Wisconsin track coach Tom Jones (also in the Hall of Fame) to help start the first NCAA outdoor championships. The meet was a success and formed the cornerstone for other NCAA championship events. From 1922 until his death in 1944, Griffith served as commissioner of the Big Ten Conference.

Education
undergraduate: Beloit College (Beloit, Wisconsin), 1902

Occupations
Track & field administrator
Coach
Professor

Florence Griffith Joyner

Photo of Florence Griffith Joyner

Inducted: 1995, athlete

Born: December 21, 1959 - Los Angeles, California
Deceased: September 21, 1998

Events
100 m - 10.49
200 m - 21.34


The nickname "Flo-Jo" has come to denote blazing speed, grace, flair and awesome talent. "Flo-Jo" is, of course, Florence Griffith Joyner, who was to the 1988 Olympic games what Wilma Rudolph was to the 1960 Rome Games. Even before the 1988 Olympics, Flo-Jo was a world record holder. Seoul merely confirmed her greatness. Her records set during those wild days of 1988 are standards that probably will prevail well into the 21st century. She still holds the women's world record of 10.49 for 100 meters and 21.34 for 200 meters and no one has come close to threatening them. Her 10.49 at the Olympic Trials in Indianapolis was one of the most eye-popping performances in track and field history. An outstanding sprinter before 1988, she showed her early promise at Jordan High School, where she anchored the relay team that posted the nation's fastest time of the year. After transferring from Cal State Northridge to UCLA, she won the NCAA 200m championship in 1982 and the 400m title in 1983. She was a silver medalist in the 200m at the 1984 Olympics and also medaled at the 1987 World Outdoor Championships, taking second in the 200 and running on the winning 4x100m relay team. At Seoul in 1988, she won three gold medals (100, 200, 4x100) and one silver (4x400), setting a world record in the 200. It was Flo-Jo's golden moment and it will be tough to repeat. She won the Sullivan Trophy in 1988. Flo-Jo married Al Joyner, 1984 Olympic triple jump champion, in 1987.

Records Held
World Record: 100 m - 10.49 (July 16, 1988 - )
World Record: 200 m - 21.34 (September 29, 1988 - )

Championships
1984 Olympics: 200 m (2nd)
1988 Olympics: 100 m (1st)
1988 Olympics: 200 m (1st)
1988 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1988 Olympics: 1,600 m relay (2nd)
1987 World Outdoors: 200 m (2nd)
1987 World Outdoors: 400 m relay (1st)
1982 NCAA: 200 m (1st)
1983 NCAA: 400 m (1st)

Education
high school: Jordan (Los Angeles, California)
undergraduate: Cal State-Northridge (Northridge, California)
undergraduate: UCLA (Los Angeles, California), 1983

Occupations
Clothing designer

Archie Hahn

Photo of Archie Hahn

Inducted: 1983, athlete

Born: September 14, 1880 - Dodgeville, Wisconsin
Deceased: January 21, 1955

Events
100 yd. - 9.80
100 m - 11.00
200 m - 21.60


One of the world's top sprinters at the beginning of the 20th century, Archie Hahn was the first runner to win the Olympic 100m-200m sprint double. He took these titles, as well as the later-discontinued 60m dash, at the 1904 Olympic Games in St. Louis. In the 200 meters, Hahn got an edge when all three of his competitors were penalized two yards for committing a false start. Taking advantage of their errors, Hahn won by a commanding three yards. He also won the gold medal in the 100 meters at the 1906 Athens Olympics. Known as the "Milwaukee Meteor," Hahn tied the world record of 9.8 seconds in the 100-yard dash in 1901 and set a world record of 21.6 seconds for the 200m straightaway in 1904. He won the U.S. 100-yard and 220-yard titles in 1903 and took another National AAU 220 title in 1905. Hahn attended the University of Michigan from 1903 to 1905 and received a law degree from the same university. However, he never practiced law. Instead, he coached at Princeton University and the University of Virginia and wrote a book, How to Sprint, which is considered a track classic.

Records Held
World Record: 100 yd. - 9.80
World Record: 200 m - 21.60 (August 31, 1904 - )

Championships
1904 Olympics: 60 m (1st)
1904 Olympics: 100 m - 11.00 (1st)
1904 Olympics: 200 m - 21.60 (1st)
1906 Olympics: 100 m (1st)
1903 AAU: 100 yd. (1st)
1903 AAU: 220 yd. (1st)
1905 AAU: 220 yd. (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Michigan (Ann Arbor, Michigan), 1905

Occupations
Coach
Author

Evelyne Hall (Adams)

Inducted: 1988, athlete

Born: September 10, 1909 - Minneapolis, Minnesota
Deceased: April 20, 1993

Events
80 m hurdles - 11.70


In one of the closest finishes in Olympic history, Evelyne Hall took second to Babe Didriksen in the 80m hurdles at the 1932 Games. Hall led going over the last hurdle, but Didriksen (en route to her second gold medal) beat her to the tape by only two inches. Both were timed in 11.7, a world record for the event. Hall was the AAU outdoor 80m hurdles champion in 1930 and won the AAU indoor 50-yard/50m hurdles in 1931, 1933 and 1935. She was a member of three national championship relay teams and in 1932 her Illinois Women's Athletic Club tied the world record for the 440-yard relay. A fourth-place finish at the 1936 Olympic Trials cost her a second chance at Olympic gold. After retiring from track, Hall stayed active as a coach and physical education instructor. She was the women's coach for the U.S. team at the first Pan-American Games in 1951. For several years, she served as the U.S. Olympic Committee's track and field chairman. Hall also worked as a supervisor of the Glendale (Calif.) Parks & Recreation Department.

Records Held
World Record: 80 m hurdles - 11.70 (August 4, 1932 - )

Championships
1932 Olympics: 80 m hurdles - 11.70 (2nd)
1930 AAU: 80 m hurdles (1st)
1931 AAU Indoors: 50 m hurdles (1st)
1933 AAU Indoors: 50 m hurdles (1st)
1935 AAU Indoors: 50 m hurdles (1st)

Occupations
Coach
Administrator

Brutus Hamilton

Photo of Brutus Hamilton

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: July 19, 1900 - Peculiar, Missouri
Deceased: December 28, 1970

Events
Decathlon - 6771 pts.


He was an assistant coach of the 1932 and 1936 U.S. Olympic teams and head coach of the 1952 team. The track coach at the University of California for 33 years, Brutus Hamilton was outstanding as both an athlete and coach. A multi-talented athlete at the University of Missouri, Hamilton led the 1920 Olympic decathlon for nine events, only to be overtaken in the 10th and final event. In addition to his silver medal in the decathlon, he placed sixth in the pentathlon at those Games and was seventh in the pentathlon at the 1924 Olympics. He later went into coaching at the University of Kansas before moving to the University of California in 1932. At California, his athletes set two world records and seven Olympic marks in additional to winning seven national collegiate team titles. As an assistant coach for the U.S. teams at the 1932 and 1936 Olympics, he guided gold-winning decathletes James Bausch (in 1932) and Glenn Morris (1936). Hamilton was head coach of the men's team that won an outstanding 14 golds at the 1952 Olympics. Among Hamilton's athletes at the University of California were fellow Hall of Fame sprinter Harold Davis, pole vaulter Guinn Smith, and middle distance runners Jerry Siebert and Don Bowden, the first American to break four minutes for the mile.

Championships
1920 Olympics: Decathlon - 6771 pts. (2nd)
1920 Olympics: Pentathlon (6th)
1924 Olympics: Pentathlon (7th)

Education
undergraduate: Missouri (Columbia, Missouri), 1922

Occupations
Coach

Glenn Hardin

Photo of Glenn Hardin

Inducted: 1978, athlete

Born: July 1, 1910 - Derma, Misssissippi
Deceased: March 6, 1975

Events
400 m hurdles - 50.60
440 yd. - 46.80


The holder of one of the most durable records in track and field history, Glenn "Slats" Hardin was the world's dominant 400m hurdler in the 1930s. He competed in both Olympic Games of that decade and was equally as tough in the 400m flat race. A versatile athlete at Louisiana State University, he won four national collegiate titles, two in the 440-yard run and two in the 220-yard low hurdles. Hardin was second in the 400m hurdles at the 1932 Olympic Games in 52.0 but was given credit for a world record when the winner, Robert Tisdail of Ireland, knocked down a hurdle, an error that in those days disqualified a performance for world record consideration. Hardin lowered the world record two more times and his 50.6 effort in 1934 lasted until 1953, one of the longest tenures of any record performance. He won three AAU intermediate hurdles titles and his best times of 46.8 for the 440 flat and 50.6 for the 400m hurdles are still impressive by today's standards. In 1936, Hardin finally got his Olympic gold medal and retired soon after, having been unbeaten in the 400m hurdles since the 1932 Olympics.

Records Held
World Record: 400 m hurdles - 50.60 (July 26, 1934 - )

Championships
1932 Olympics: 400 m hurdles - 52.00 (2nd)
1936 Olympics: 400 m hurdles (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Louisiana State (Baton Rouge, Louisiana), 1934

Ted Haydon

Inducted: 1975, coach

Born: March 29, 1912 - Saskatoon, CA
Deceased: May 3, 1985


A track captain at the University of Chicago in 1933, Edward "Ted" Haydon returned to his alma mater 14 years later and went on to develop one of the top club programs in the nation. A social worker in his early post-graduate years, Haydon became a volunteer coach at the University of Chicago in 1947 and moved up to head coach three years later. He later formed the University of Chicago Track Club, which became a national force. Haydon's coaching style was noted for its informality but he helped develop post-college athletes who otherwise would not have had a chance to compete. One of Haydon's most famous pupils was Hall of Famer Rick Wohlhuter, former world record holder in the 800 meters and an Olympic bronze medalist in 1972. Other UCTC standouts were shot putter Brian Oldfield, pole vaulter Jan Johnson and hammer thrower Jud Logan. A UCTC two-mile relay team also once held the world record. Haydon coached and managed several international teams, including the U.S. squad in its 1975 dual meet with the USSR, and he served as an assistant coach at the Olympic and Pan-American Games.

Education
undergraduate: Chicago (Chicago, Illinois)

Occupations
Coach

Billy Hayes

Photo of Billy Hayes

Inducted: 1976, coach

Born: - Madison, Indiana
Deceased: December 13, 1943


As coach at Indiana University from 1925 to 1943, Earl "Billy" Hayes developed some of the best distance runners in the nation's history. Hayes' cross country teams won three NCAA team titles and also won the national collegiate outdoor team title. The Hoosiers' track team went from finishing 8th in the Big Ten in 1925 to capturing eight conference titles, six straight from 1928 through 1933. Indiana never finished below second from 1928 until Hayes retired. An exponent of long distance training for his athletes, including sprinters, Hayes built a reputation as one of the finest coaches of his era and his influence carried over long after his death in 1943. His star athletes included Olympians Ivan Fuqua, Chuck Hornbostel, Don Lash (also a Hall of Famer), Roy Cochran, Fred Wilt (also a Hall of Famer) and Tom Deckard. Others such as Campbell Kane and Archie Harris were National AAU champions. Hayes was instrumental in organizing the first NCAA Cross Country Championship as well as the formation of the National Collegiate Cross Country Association, for which he served as president. Hayes also was an assistant coach on the 1936 U.S. Olympic team.

Occupations
Coach

Bob Hayes

Photo of Bob Hayes

Inducted: 1976, athlete

Born: December 20, 1942 - Jacksonville, Florida
Deceased: September 18, 2002

Events
100 yd. - 9.10
100 m - 10.06


Rumbling down a straightaway or outrunning a defense back, Bob Hayes was an awesome sight as a sprinter and football star. His claim to being the "world's fastest human" was solidified by his three national AAU titles, NCAA title (while a student at Florida A&M), and his three consecutive years as the world's top-ranked 100m runner. The first person to run 100 yards in 9.1 as well as the first to break 6.0 for 60 yards, Hayes also briefly held the world record of 20.5 for 200 meters. In 1964, he added the 100m record to his list, winning the Olympic championship by an unprecedented margin of seven feet. He was even more impressive in the 4x100m relay, where poor passing left the U.S. team in fifth place when anchorman Hayes took the baton. His performance, described by one writer as "one of the most awesome and breathtaking displays of sprinting ever seen," catapulted the U.S. team into a three-meter margin at the finish. The time of 39.0 set a world record. Hayes later became an outstanding wide receiver with the Dallas Cowboys pro football team.

Records Held
World Record: 100 m - 10.06 (October 15, 1964 - )
World Record: 400 m relay - 39.00

Championships
1964 Olympics: 100 m - 10.06 (1st)
1964 Olympics: 400 m relay - 39.00 (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Florida A&M (Boca Raton, Florida), 1964

Occupations
Pro football player

Ward Haylett

Inducted: 1979, coach

Born: September 20, 1895 - Willow Springs, Missouri
Deceased: November 1, 1990


The coach at Kansas State University for 35 years, Ward Haylett highlighted his coaching career by serving as an assistant coach on the 1948 Olympic team. A graduate of Doane (Neb.) College, where we won 16 letters, Haylett coached five years at Clay Center (Neb.) High School and five more at Doane before becoming the Wildcats' first head coach in 1928. Until his retirement in 1963, Haylett's teams usually were in the Big Eight Conference's first division. One of his top athletes was sprinter Thane Baker, who captured three medals, including one gold, at the 1956 Olympics. Another top athlete was Elmer Hackney, who was the national collegiate shot put champion in 1938 and 1939. Haylett was head coach of the 1937 Pan-American team and a three-time member of the U.S. Olympic Committee.

Education
undergraduate: Doane College (Crete, Nebraska), 1918

Occupations
Coach

Franklin (Bud) Held

Photo of Franklin (Bud) Held

Inducted: 1987, athlete

Born: October 25, 1927 - Los Angeles, California

Events
Javelin Throw - 82.30 m


Bud Held contributed to the sport of track and field in many ways but it was his excellence as a javelin thrower that brought him world recognition. He started as a pole vaulter in high school but at Stanford University he developed into a world-class javelin thrower, winning national collegiate titles in 1948, 1949 and 1950. In 1951, he threw 249' 8", the first of six American records he was to set. He became the first American ever to hold the world javelin record when he threw 263' 10" in 1953. He set another world record of 268' 2" in 1955 and overall was ranked first in the world three times. He was the AAU national champion six times, in 1949, 1951, 1953-55 and 1958 and ranked first in the U.S. seven times. Held was a member of the 1952 Olympic team, placing ninth after injuring a shoulder. He set a career best of 270' 0" in 1956. That year, he just missed making his second Olympic team by one inch. He was still throwing in 1970 at the age of 42 and set a national Masters' record of 229' 3". During his career, Held experimented with a hollow javelin, which was subsequently outlawed. He then designed a javelin without the usual weighted steel tip, replacing it with a thick middle section and altering the implement's center of gravity. Following his retirement, he became a successful businessman, selling sporting equipment.

Records Held
World Record: Javelin Throw - 80.42 m

Championships
1952 Olympics: Javelin Throw (9th)
1949 AAU: Javelin Throw (1st)
1951 AAU: Javelin Throw (1st)
1953 AAU: Javelin Throw (1st)
1954 AAU: Javelin Throw (1st)
1955 AAU: Javelin Throw (1st)
1958 AAU: Javelin Throw (1st)
1948 NCAA: Javelin Throw (1st)
1949 NCAA: Javelin Throw (1st)
1950 NCAA: Javelin Throw (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Stanford (Palo Alto, California), 1950

Occupations
Businessman

Ralph Higgins

Photo of Ralph Higgins

Inducted: 1982, coach

Born: March 22, 1902 - Fort Cobb, Oklahoma
Deceased: September 13, 1993


The track coach at Oklahoma State University for 32 years, Ralph Higgins was on the Olympic staff in 1956 and 1960 and developed such top athletes as Olympian J.W. Mashburn, outstanding pole vaulters Jim Graham, George Davies and Aubrey Dooley and miler Tom Von Ruden. Higgins graduated from Oklahoma A&M (now Oklahoma State) in 1925 after a sporting career that saw him compete in football, basketball and track, winning the Southwest Conference 100 and 440 titles in the latter sport. He became OSU's head track coach in 1935 and his teams won many titles, including 17-straight Missouri Valley Conference team championships when the school was in that league. His 1954 cross country team won the national collegiate title and his 1965 indoor track team was second at the national collegiate championships. After leaving OSU, he helped coach the U.S. Army track team.

Education
undergraduate: Oklahoma A&M (Stillwater, Oklahoma), 1925

Occupations
Coach

Harry Hillman

Inducted: 1976, athlete

Born: August 9, 1881 - Brooklyn, New York
Deceased: August 9, 1945

Events
400 m - 49.20
400 m hurdles - 55.30


A member of three Olympic teams at the turn of the 20th century, Harry Hillman also was an outstanding coach at Dartmouth College. Hillman won three gold medals at the 1904 Olympics, taking the flat 400m, the 200m low hurdles and the 400m hurdles. He had Olympic record times in all three events, but his time in the 400m hurdles wasn't allowed as a record because he knocked over one hurdle. He finished 5th in the 400m run at the unofficial 1906 Athens Olympics after being injured when an enormous wave washed over the deck of his ship during the Atlantic crossing. At the 1908 London Olympics, he was a silver medalist in the 400m hurdles. He also won four AAU titles, two each in the 200 and 400m hurdles. On April 24, Hillman and Lawson Robertson set a record that has never been equaled, running the 100-yard three-legged race in 11.0 seconds. He coached track at Dartmouth from 1910 until his death in 1945. He was also an Olympic coach in 1924, 1928 and 1932. One of his most famous athletes was hurdler and fellow Hall of Famer Earl Thomson.

Championships
1904 Olympics: 200 m hurdles (1st)
1904 Olympics: 400 m - 49.20 (1st)
1904 Olympics: 400 m hurdles (1st)
1906 Olympics: 400 m (5th)
1908 Olympics: 400 m hurdles - 55.30 (2nd)

Occupations
Coach

Jim Hines

Inducted: 1979, athlete

Born: September 10, 1946 - Dumas, Arkansas

Events
100 yd. - 9.10
100 m - 9.95


Before establishing himself as the "World's Fastest Human," Jim Hines showed his promise at McClymonds High School in Oakland, Calif., where he was undefeated in the 100 and 220 and tied the 100-yard national prep school record with a time of 9.4 seconds. As a student at Texas Southern University, Hines was the AAU 220-yard champion in 1966 and won the 100-yard dash at the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics championship meet in 1967. That year, he also tied the world 100-yard dash record of 9.1 at the California Relays in Modesto. In 1968, Hines was one of three sprinters who ran the 100 meters in 9.9 seconds -- all in the semi-finals of the National AAUs in Sacramento. Hines actually finished second in the finals to fellow recordholder Charles Greene before winning the Olympic trials. At the Mexico City Olympics, Hines established his "World's Fastest" title, winning the 100 meters in a world record time of 9.95 that remained unsurpassed for 15 years. In the 4x100m relay, he took the baton for the anchor leg in third place, before propelling the U.S. to victory in a world record time of 38.6. After retiring from track and field, Hines played one season with the Miami Dolphins in the American Football League.

Records Held
World Record: 100 yd. - 9.10
World Record: 100 m - 9.95 (October 14, 1968 - )
World Record: 400 m relay - 38.60

Championships
1968 Olympics: 100 m - 9.95 (1st)
1968 Olympics: 400 m relay - 38.60 (1st)
1966 AAU: 220 yd. (1st)
1967 NAIA: 100 yd. (1st)

Education
high school: McClymonds (Oakland, California)
undergraduate: Texas Southern (Houston, Texas), 1968

Occupations
Pro football player
Administrator

Clarence (Bud) Houser

Photo of Clarence (Bud) Houser

Inducted: 1979, athlete

Born: September 25, 1901 - Winnigan, Missouri
Deceased: October 1, 1994

Events
Discus Throw - 48.20 m


"Bud" Houser was the last weightman to win both the shot put and discus throw at the same Olympic Games. He accomplished that feat in 1924, setting an Olympic record of 151' 4" in the discus. Four years later, he repeated his victory in the discus with a new record of 155' 3". Houser competed at the University of Southern California where he was coached by Dean Crowell, also a member of the Hall of Fame. While in college, Houser introduced speed rotation in the circle and his new technique paid off with some big dividends. He won the national collegiate discus title in 1926, the same year he set a world record of 158' 1 3/4" at a dual meet between Southern Cal and Stanford. He also won five AAU titles, three in the discus (1925, 1926 and 1928) and two in the shot. The first of these titles, in the shot in 1921, came when he was still a schoolboy. While still competing, Houser earned his degree in dentistry and set up practice in Palm Springs, Calif.

Records Held
World Record: Discus Throw - 48.18 m (April 3, 1926 - )

Championships
1924 Olympics: Shot Put (1st)
1924 Olympics: Discus Throw - 46.12 m (1st)
1928 Olympics: Discus Throw - 47.32 m (1st)
1921 AAU: Shot Put (1st)
1925 AAU: Discus Throw (1st)
1926 AAU: Discus Throw (1st)
1928 AAU: Discus Throw (1st)
1926 NCAA: Discus Throw (1st)

Education
undergraduate: USC (Los Angeles, California), 1926

Occupations
Dentist

DeHart Hubbard

Inducted: 1979, athlete

Born: November 25, 1903 - Cincinnati, Ohio
Deceased: June 23, 1976

Events
Long Jump - 7.89 m
100 yd. - 9.60


William DeHart Hubbard was the first black athlete to win an individual Olympic gold medal when he won the long jump at the 1924 Paris Games. A versatile multi-event competitor, he also represented the U.S. in the triple jump in 1924 and again long jumped at the 1928 Olympics. While at the University of Michigan, Hubbard won the NCAA Championships in the long jump in 1923 and 1925, setting a world record of 25' 10 3/4" on the latter occasion. In 1925, he also won the 100-yard dash at the NCAAs, tying the existing world record of 9.6 seconds. Hubbard won six straight AAU long jump titles from 1922 to 1927 and was AAU triple jump champion in 1922 and 1923.

Records Held
World Record: Long Jump - 7.89 m (June 13, 1925 - )
World Record: 100 yd. - 9.60

Championships
1924 Olympics: Long Jump (1st)
1922 AAU: Triple Jump (1st)
1922 AAU: Long Jump (1st)
1923 AAU: Triple Jump (1st)
1923 AAU: Long Jump (1st)
1924 AAU: Long Jump (1st)
1925 AAU: Long Jump (1st)
1926 AAU: Long Jump (1st)
1927 AAU: Long Jump (1st)
1923 NCAA: Long Jump (1st)
1925 NCAA: Long Jump - 7.89 m (1st)
1925 NCAA: 100 yd. - 9.60 (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Michigan (Ann Arbor, Michigan), 1925

Edward Hurt

Photo of Edward Hurt

Inducted: 1975, coach

Born: February 12, 1900 - Brookneal, Virginia
Deceased: March 24, 1989


A long-time athletic administrator at Morgan State College in Baltimore, Md., Edward "Ed" Hurt served as the school's athletic director, head football coach, and head track coach during his 40-year tenure beginning in 1929. His football teams won 54 straight games and his track teams were just as awesome with such world-class athletes as George Rhoden, Elmore Harris and Art Bragg among his charges. In all, Morgan State athletes won eight national collegiate individual titles and 12 National AAU championships under his tutelage. A graduate of Howard University, Hurt became head track coach at Morgan State in 1929 and built the school into a national power. He was on the coaching staffs at both the 1959 Pan-American Games and the 1964 Olympic Games.

Education
undergraduate: Howard (Washington D.C., )

Occupations
Coach
Athletic director

Wilbur Hutsell

Inducted: 1975, coach

Born: November 10, 1892 - Moberly, Missouri
Deceased: December 8, 1980


The head track coach at Auburn University for 42 years, Wilbur Hutsell developed some of the finest hurdlers in the world, including fellow Hall of Fame enshrines Weems Baskin and Percy Beard. Both Baskin and Beard also became renowned coaches whose teams frequently competed against Hutsell's Tigers. While at Auburn, Hutsell's teams had a 140-25 dual meet record and won three Southeastern Conference team titles. During the period between 1921 and 1963, he coached four Olympians -- 400-meter runner Snitz Snider in 1928, Beard in 1932, steeplechaser Whitey Overton in 1948 and discus thrower Jim Dillon in 1952. He was the trainer for the 1924 Olympic wrestling team and was an assistant track coach at the 1928 Olympic Games.

Occupations
Coach

Nell Jackson

Photo of Nell Jackson

Inducted: 1989, athlete

Born: July 1, 1929 - Athens, Georgia
Deceased: April 1, 1988

Events
200 m - 24.20


One of the pioneers in women's track and field, Nell Jackson served the sport as an athlete, coach and administrator. At the time of her death, she was secretary of The Athletics Congress (TAC) and had previously been a TAC vice president. At 15, she competed in her first national championships. A year later, in 1945, she placed second in the 200-meter indoor and outdoor nationals, losing both times to Olympic champion Stella Walsh. The following year, she was named to the U.S. All-America team in the 200 meters. While a student at Tuskegee Institute (where she was coached by Hall of Famer Cleve Abbott), she was a member of the 1948 Olympic teams and also competed in the first Pan-American Games in 1951, taking second in the 200 meters and running on the winning sprint relay team. In 1949, she set an American record of 24.2 seconds in the 200 meters. She won the national title in the 200 meters in 1950, beating Stella Walsh, and anchored Tuskegee's winning 4x100m relay team. Jackson later became a coach at Tuskegee, Illinois State, University of Illinois, and Michigan State. She was the U.S. Olympic women's head coach in 1956 and 1972 and was the first African American to be named head coach of the U.S. Olympic team. Administratively, she served many organizations, including the U.S. Olympic Committee and the IAAF, as well as being an officer of TAC from 1979 to 1988.

Records Held
American Record: 200 m - 24.20 (August 13, 1949 - )

Championships
1945 AAU: 200 m (2nd)
1945 AAU Indoors: 200 m (2nd)
1951 Pan-Am Games: 200 m (2nd)
1951 Pan-Am Games: 400 m relay (1st)
1950 NCAA: 200 m (1st)
1950 NCAA: 400 m relay (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Tuskegee Institute (Tuskegee, Alabama), 1951

Occupations
Coach
Administrator

Charlie Jenkins

Photo of Charlie Jenkins

Inducted: 1992, athlete

Born: January 7, 1934 - New York, New York

Events
600 yd. - 1:10.40


Running for Hall of Fame coach Jumbo Elliott's Villanova track team, Charlie Jenkins won the IC4A 440-yard championship in 1955 and 1957 and was the indoor 600-yard champion from 1955 through 1957. He also won the AAU outdoor 440-yard dash in 1955 and the indoor 600-yard event in 1957 and 1958. He set a world indoor best for 500 yards in 1956. Despite his successes, Jenkins came to the 1956 Melbourne Olympics as an underdog in the 400 meters to fellow American Lou Jones, who had set a world record of 45.2 seconds at the Olympic Trials. In that race, Jenkins had finished a distant third. After barely qualifying in the first two rounds of the Olympic 400, Jenkins won his semi-final race in 46.1. In the final, a strong finish earned him the race in a time of 46.7. He won his second gold medal in the 4x400m relay, recording a 45.5 leg for the winning U.S. team. When Jumbo Elliott died in 1981, Jenkins succeeded him as Villanova coach. One of his runners was his son, Chip, who placed third at the 1986 NCAA outdoor championships. Like his father, Chip also became an Olympic gold medalist, running as a reserve on the U.S. 4x400m relay team at the 1992 Olympic Games.

Championships
1956 Olympics: 400 m - 46.70 (1st)
1956 Olympics: 1,600 m relay (1st)
1955 AAU: 440 yd. (1st)
1957 AAU Indoors: 600 yd. (1st)
1958 AAU Indoors: 600 yd. (1st)
1955 IC4A: 440 yd. (1st)
1955 IC4A Indoors: 600 yd. (1st)
1956 IC4A Indoors: 600 yd. (1st)
1957 IC4A: 440 m (1st)
1957 IC4A Indoors: 600 yd. (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Villanova (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 1958
graduate: University of Massachusetts at Amherst (Amherst, Massachusetts)

Occupations
Coach

Bruce Jenner

Photo of Bruce Jenner

Inducted: 1980, athlete

Born: October 28, 1949 - Mt. Kisco, New York

Events
Decathlon - 8634 pts.


While in high school, Bruce Jenner demonstrated his versatility early, excelling in football, basketball and track, and winning New York State championships in the pole vault and high jump. He was awarded a football scholarship to small Graceland College in Iowa, but after injuring his knee on the gridiron, he directed his athletic prowess to the decathlon. With limited experience in the 10-event discipline, he qualified as the third man on the U.S. team for the 1972 Olympics and finished tenth at the Munich Games. Over the next four years he improved dramatically, winning the National AAU title in 1974, setting a world record in the USA-USSR-Poland meet in 1975, and winning the Pan-American Games title that same year. In 1976, he improved on his world record in winning the Olympic Trials decathlon, then capped his career with another world record performance at the Montreal Olympics. He parlayed his gold-medal triumph into a career in television, films and motivational speaking.

Championships
1972 Olympics: Decathlon (10th)
1976 Olympics: Decathlon - 8634 pts. (1st)
1975 Pan-Am Games: Decathlon (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Graceland College (Lamoni, Iowa), 1973

Occupations
Actor
Motivational speaker
TV personality
Author

Cornelius Johnson

Photo of Cornelius Johnson

Inducted: 1994, athlete

Born: August 28, 1913 - Los Angeles, California
Deceased: February 15, 1946

Events
High Jump - 2.08 m


Cornelius Johnson was an 18-year-old high school student when he placed fourth in the high jump at the 1932 Olympics, even though he cleared the same height as the three medalists. The rule under which he was placed fourth later changed. Under the modern tie-breaking procedure, he would have won the silver medal. The 6' 5" Johnson built on his first Olympic experience, winning the AAU outdoor championship in 1933 and 1935 and tying for the title in 1932, 1934 and 1936. He also won or tied for the indoor championship three times. In 1936, he became the world indoor record holder at 6' 8 15/16" and co-holder of the outdoor world record of 6' 9 3/4", which he and fellow American Dave Albritton both cleared at the Olympic Trials. At the Berlin Olympics, Johnson brimmed with confidence, jumping in his sweats until the bar reached 6' 6 3/4" and winning the event with an Olympic record leap of 6' 8". Ironically, it was Johnson -- and not Jesse Owens, as widely believed -- who was snubbed by Adolf Hitler at the Berlin Games. On the day of Johnson's triumph, Hitler had congratulated the winners of the day's first two events, a German and a Finn. But before Johnson and silver medalist Albritton, both African Americans, went to the awards platform, Hitler left the stadium. In early 1946, while working as a ship's baker on board the Grace Line's "Santa Cruz," Johnson was stricken with a sudden illness. En route from the ship to a California hospital, Corny Johnson died at the age of 32.

Records Held
World Record: High Jump - 2.08 m (July 12, 1936 - )

Championships
1932 Olympics: High Jump (4th)
1936 Olympics: High Jump - 2.03 m (1st)
1932 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1933 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1934 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1935 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1936 AAU: High Jump (1st)

Education
junior college: Compton College (Compton, California)

Occupations
Seaman

Rafer Johnson

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: August 18, 1935 - Hillsboro, Texas

Events
Decathlon - 7982 pts.


One of the greatest all-around track athletes in history, Rafer Johnson competed equally well in several events while a student at UCLA and quite naturally made his mark in the decathlon. In high school, Johnson excelled in football, baseball, basketball and track. An outstanding sprinter and long jumper, he gravitated to the decathlon after seeing Olympic champion Bob Mathias compete in the 10-event ordeal. Less than a month later, Johnson won the California state junior decathlon championship. By 1955, in his fourth attempt at the event, he scored 7,608 points, displacing Mathias as world record holder. That same year, he won the decathlon at the Pan-American Games. In 1956, he qualified for the Olympic team in both the long jump and decathlon, but because of a knee injury, he limited himself to the 10-event competition. At Melbourne, he finished second to fellow American and Hall of Famer Milt Campbell. Johnson never lost again. He won three National AAU titles from 1956 to 1960 and his duels with the USSR's Vasiliy Kuznetsov and Taiwan's C.K. Yang, also a UCLA teammate, were some of the greatest in track history. Johnson capped his career by winning the 1960 Olympic championship in a world record performance. Winner of the 1960 Sullivan Award as the nation's top amateur athlete, Johnson retired to begin to work for President John Kennedy's Peace Corps. Like many other decathlon stars, he later became a movie actor and a successful businessman.

Championships
1956 Olympics: Decathlon (2nd)
1960 Olympics: Decathlon (1st)
1955 Pan-Am Games: Decathlon (1st)

Education
high school: Kingsburg (Kingsburg, California)
undergraduate: UCLA (Los Angeles, California), 1958

Occupations
Actor
Sportscaster
Politician

Hayes Jones

Photo of Hayes Jones

Inducted: 1976, athlete

Born: August 4, 1938 - Starkville, Mississippi

Events
120 yd. hurdles - 13.40
110 m hurdles - 13.40


At 5' 10", Hayes Jones was not big by hurdling standards but he was very fast, very competitive and very consistent. Blessed with 9.4 100-yard dash speed and an excellent start, Jones built on an outstanding competitive record to become Olympic champion in the 110m hurdles in 1964. His first major international experience came in 1959, when he won the 110m hurdles at the Pan-American Games. A year later, at the Rome Olympics he was third behind teammates Lee Calhoun and Willie May. He advanced from bronze to gold four years later, winning the Tokyo Olympics in a time of 13.6. At Pontiac High School, he won the Class A state title in the long jump (1956). At Eastern Michigan University, he won the high hurdles and low hurdles doubles at the national championships as a sophomore in 1958. He went on to capture nine AAU hurdles titles over a six-year period. Indoors, where his fast start made him virtually unbeatable, he logged 55 straight wins and set a world indoor best of 6.8 for 60 yards in 1962. While in college, he also ran impressively in both the 100 and 220 and was a member of a world record setting 4x100m relay team. Following his retirement, Jones entered private business.

Championships
1960 Olympics: 110 m hurdles (3rd)
1964 Olympics: 110 m hurdles - 13.60 (1st)
1959 Pan-Am Games: 110 m hurdles (1st)

Education
high school: Pontiac (Pontiac, Michigan), 1956
undergraduate: Eastern Michigan (Ypsilanti, Michigan), 1960

Occupations
Businessman
Recreational director

Thomas Jones

Inducted: 1977, coach

Born: November 14, 1877 - Cresco, Iowa
Deceased: April 30, 1969


Career Highlights

  • Jones' Wisconsin Badgers won 15 Big Ten championships, including nine in cross country.

The head track coach at the University of Wisconsin from 1913 to 1948, Tom Jones capped his coaching career by serving as an assistant coach with the 1948 Olympic team. During his 35 years with the Badgers, Jones produced 15 Big Ten championship teams, nine of them in cross country. He coached some of the finest distance runners in U.S. track history, including Walter Mehl, Chuck Fenske and Don Gehrmann. Another of his famous athletes was Arlie Mucks, a 1912 Olympian who was among the dominant U.S. weightmen during the World War I era. In 1921, Jones, along with famed football coach Amos Alonzo Stagg of Chicago and John Griffith (also in the Hall of Fame) started the first NCAA outdoor track championships.

Occupations
Coach

Payton Jordan

Photo of Payton Jordan

Inducted: 1982, coach

Born: March 19, 1917 - Whittier, California


Career Highlights

  • Jordan was a member of the USC 4x110-yard relay team that set a world record in 1938.

An outstanding athlete at the University of Southern California, Payton Jordan went on to become a legendary coach at Occidental College and Stanford University as well as a record-setting Masters runner. At USC, where he was coached by fellow Hall of Famer Dean Cromwell, Jordan excelled in track, rugby and football. On the track, he helped the Trojans win two national collegiate team titles and was a member of a world-record setting 4x110-yard relay team. He won the AAU 100m title in 1941 and after World War II became track coach at Occidental College, turning that small school into a national power. After 10 years at Occidental, he moved to Stanford in 1957. Over the next 22 years, he took the Cardinal to a second-place NCAA finish in 1963, produced seven Olympic athletes and numerous NCAA champions. He capped a distinguished career as the head coach of the 1968 Olympic team in Mexico City after serving as an assistant at the 1964 Olympics. A successful meet director, Jordan directed two of the greatest track meets ever held on American soil -- the 1960 Olympic Trials and the 1962 USA-USSR dual meet, both at Stanford. A member of the USC, Occidental, Stanford, NAIA halls of fame, among others, Jordan was awarded the Dwight D. Eisenhower Fitness Award by the U.S. Sports Academy in 1999.

Championships
1941 AAU: 100 m (1st)

Education
high school: Pasadena (Pasadena, California)
junior college: Santa Monica CC (Santa Monica, California)
undergraduate: USC (Los Angeles, California), 1939

Occupations
Coach

John A. Kelley

Inducted: 1980, athlete

Born: September 6, 1907 - West Medford, Massachusetts

Events
marathon - 2:30:41


A marathon runner whose career spanned an amazing eight decades, John A. Kelley competed in two Olympic Games and was deprived of two other opportunities because of World War II. Kelley made his first Olympic appearance in 1936 and was 18th in the marathon. He was one of the few veterans of the 1936 Games who also competed in 1948, placing 21st that time. He also was selected to the 1940 Olympic team but those Games were cancelled by war. He narrowly missed being chosen for a fourth time in 1952, at the age of 44. Kelley ran the Boston Marathon an astonishing 61 times from 1931 until 1992, finishing 58 of those races and winning that famed event in 1935 and 1945. His time of 2:30.41 led the world in 1945 and he had the second-best time during several other years. During his long career, he competed in 115 marathons covering a 64-year period. His running career began at Arlington High School, where he competed in track and cross country and completed his best-ever mile in 4:40. On a national level, he was an 11-time AAU champion in four events, including the marathon (1948 and 1950), 15,000 meters (1937 and 1954); 20,000 meters (1943 and 1954), and 25,000 meters (1937 and 1941-1944).

Championships
1936 Olympics: marathon (18th)
1948 Olympics: marathon (21st)
1937 AAU: 15,000 m (1st)
1937 AAU: 25,000 m (1st)
1941 AAU: 25,000 m (1st)
1942 AAU: 25,000 m (1st)
1943 AAU: 20,000 m (1st)
1943 AAU: 25,000 m (1st)
1944 AAU: 25,000 m (1st)
1948 AAU: marathon (1st)
1950 AAU: marathon (1st)
1954 AAU: 15,000 m (1st)
1954 AAU: 20,000 m (1st)

Education
high school: Arlington (Arlington, Massachusetts)

Occupations
Maintenance man

Abel Kiviat

Photo of Abel Kiviat

Inducted: 1985, athlete

Born: June 23, 1892 - New York, New York
Deceased: August 24, 1991

Events
1,500 m - 3:55.80
1 mi. - 4:15.60


Abel Kiviat was one of the greatest middle distance runners in the world prior to World War I. At one point, he simultaneously held the world indoor bests in the 600, 1,000 and one mile, the only person in history ever to accomplish that feat. In 1912, he set a world record of 3:55.8 in the 1500m run at the Olympic Trial, then continued on to the mile post, finishing in 4:15.6, just 0.2 seconds above the world record for that distance. In the Olympic final, he placed second, just 0.1 second behind the winner, Arnold Strode Jackson of Great Britain. Starting in 1909 while he was a senior at Curtis High School in New York City, Kiviat went on to win five national indoor titles and four outdoors, three in the mile run and one in cross country. After serving in the U.S. Army in France during World War I, Kiviat returned to running until 1925. He maintained a life-long interest in the sport by serving as a press steward at major meets.

Records Held
World Record: 1,500 m - 3:55.80 (June 8, 1912 - )

Championships
1912 Olympics: 1,500 m (2nd)

Education
high school: Curtis (New York, New York), 1910

Occupations
Press steward

Alvin Kraenzlein

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: December 12, 1876 - Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Deceased: January 6, 1928

Events
Long Jump - 7.43 m
60 m - 7.00
120 yd. hurdles - 15.20


Considered the father of the modern hurdling technique, Alvin Kraenzlein was the star of the 1900 Olympic Games, winning four individual gold medals, the only track athlete ever to accomplish that feat. Kraenzlein was the first to go over the hurdle with a straight front leg and the trailing leg tucked under. While at the University of Wisconsin, Kranezlein won his first major championship in the AAU national 220-yard hurdles in 1897. That year, he transferred to the University of Pennsylvania, where he won AAU national championships in the 120- and 220-yard hurdles in 1898 and 1899 and was also the 1989 long jump champion. He also captured IC4A championships in both hurdling events for three straight years, 1898 through 1900. He scored a record 18 points in the 1899 meet, when he won the 100-yard dash and finished second in the long jump to lead Penn to the team championships. At the 1900 Paris Olympics, he won the 60m dash, long jump, 110m hurdles and 200m hurdles over a three-day period. Over his career, he held world records in four events. He earned his dentistry degree from the University of Pennsylvania but chose coaching as a profession. He served as head track coach at the University of Michigan from 1910 until 1913 and later coached the German and Cuban national teams before becoming assistant coach at the University of Pennsylvania.

Records Held
World Record: 60 m - 7.00 (July 15, 1900 - )
World Record: 120 yd. hurdles - 15.20 (June 18, 1898 - )

Championships
1900 Olympics: Long Jump (1st)
1900 Olympics: 60 m (1st)
1900 Olympics: 110 m hurdles (1st)
1900 Olympics: 200 m hurdles (1st)
1897 AAU: 220 yd. hurdles (1st)
1898 AAU: 120 yd. hurdles (1st)
1898 AAU: 220 yd. hurdles (1st)
1899 AAU: Long Jump (1st)
1899 AAU: 120 yd. hurdles (1st)
1899 AAU: 220 yd. hurdles (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Wisconsin (Madison, Wisconsin)
undergraduate: Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 1900

Occupations
Coach

Ron Laird

Photo of Ron Laird

Inducted: 1986, athlete

Born: May 31, 1938 - Louisville, Kentucky

Events
1,500 m race walk - 5:50.20
1 mi. race walk - 6:14.40
2 mi. race walk - 13:31
5 km race walk - 21:09
10 km race walk - 43:07
10 mi. race walk - 1:10:42
20 km race walk - 1:28:18
20 mi. race walk - 2:40:12
50 km race walk - 4:29:39


"Longevity" is a word that is synonymous with Ron Laird's race-walking career. "Success" is another. Laird's career spanned three decades in which he won 65 national championships. Laird's first taste of success came in 1958 when he won national titles in both the 20 and 25-kilometer walks, starting a streak in which he won at least one American title for the next 18 years. He had seven wins in 1965, eight in 1967 and nine in 1969. Laird's amazing string eclipsed Hall of Famer Henry Laskau's record of 42 American titles. At one point, Laird won five-straight 15 km titles. His highest win total in any event was seven in both the 15 km and one-hour races. Laird won his final title in 1976, the same year in which he made his fourth U.S. Olympic team (1960, 1964 and 1968 were the other three). He won the gold medal in the 20 km walk at the 1967 Pan-American Games after a fourth-place finish in 1963. He placed third at 20 km in the 1967 and 1973 World Cup. Laird held 81 American records at distances ranging from 1 km to 25 miles and was named six times as the outstanding U.S. race walker.

Championships
1960 Olympics: 50 km race walk - 4:53:22 (19th)
1964 Olympics: 20 km race walk
1968 Olympics: 20 km race walk - 1:44:38 (25th)
1976 Olympics: 20 km race walk - 1:33:28 (20th)
1967 World Cup: 20,000 m race walk (3rd)
1973 World Cup: 20,000 m race walk (3rd)
1964 AAU & Olympic Trials: 20 km race walk - 1:34:45 (1st)
1963 Pan-Am Games: 20,000 m race walk (4th)
1967 Pan-Am Games: 20,000 m race walk (1st)

Education
high school: Peekskill High School (Peekskill, New York), 1956

Occupations
Draftsman
House painter

Francine Larrieu (Smith)

Photo of Francine Larrieu (Smith)

Inducted: 1998, athlete

Born: November 23, 1952 - Palo Alto, California

Events
1,500 m - 4:05.09
1 mi. - 4:27.52
3,000 m - 8:50.54
5,000 m - 15:15.20
10,000 m - 31:28.92
marathon - 2:27:15


Francie Larrieu Smith's running career spanned four decades and included 13 world indoor records and a total of 35 American records in distances ranging from 1000 meters to two miles. She began running at 13 and won the first competition she ever entered, a 660-yard race for junior girls. Competing for the San Jose Cindergals, she won the first of her 21 national titles as a 17-year-old in the 1500 meters in 1970. In 1972, she scored an unusual double, winning AAU national titles in the 1500m and cross country. She repeated in 1973, winning the mile and cross-country championships. After missing most of a year with injuries, Larrieu-Smith came back in 1975 to set a world record of 4:28.5 in the mile at the USA-USSR indoor meet. Larrieu-Smith is the only female athlete to make five Olympic teams. She competed in the 1500 meters in the 1972 and 1976 Olympics and, also in the 1500m, made the team that boycotted the Olympics in 1980. She missed out on the 1984 team but ran the 10,000 at the 1988 Games, taking fifth. She moved up to the marathon for the 1992 Games, finishing 12th in Barcelona. At the 1992 Games, she carried the U.S. flag at the Opening Ceremonies. She also ran in the 1987 and 1991 World Championships in the 10,000. Selected by Runner's World magazine as "The Most Versatile runner of the Quarter Centurn," Larrieu Smith has been head women's and men's cross country and track and field coach at Southwestern University since 1999. She earned a master's degree in Sports Administration from the University of Texas in 2000.

Records Held
World Record: 1 mi. - 4:28.50

Championships
1988 Olympics: 10,000 m (5th)
1992 Olympics: marathon (12th)
1970 AAU: 1,500 m (1st)
1972 AAU: 1,500 m (1st)
1973 AAU: 1 mi. (1st)

Education
high school: Fremont (Sunnyvale, California), 1970
undergraduate: Long Beach State (Long Beach, California), 1977

Occupations
Coach

Don Lash

Photo of Don Lash

Inducted: 1995, athlete

Born: August 15, 1914 - Bluffton, Indiana
Deceased: September 19, 1994

Events
2 mi. - 8:58
10,000 m - 31:06.90


One of the nation's top distance runners prior to World War II, Donald "Don" Lash won 12 national titles from 1934 to 1940, including seven in a row in cross country. This consistency prompted Sports Illustrated to call Lash "the first great American distance runner" and "possibly the best U.S. cross country runner ever." Lash's streak stood until Pat Porter broke it in 1989. Growing up in Auburn, Ind., Lash won the mile run at the 1933 state high school championship with a time of 4:30.5. At Indiana University, under Hall of Fame coach Billy Hayes, Lash finished third in his first cross country race. It was the last cross country race he ever lost. While a student at Indiana, Lash set an American record at 10,000 meters, clocking 31:06.9. Lash was still a collegian when he competed at the 1936 Olympics, placing 13th in the 5000m and 8th in the 10,000m. That summer he broke the legendary Paavo Nurmi's world record for the two mile, running 8:58.4. In 1938, Lash won the Sullivan Trophy as the nation's top amateur athlete. He was still winning national championships in 1940 but World War II snuffed out any chance for greater Olympic glory. After college, Lash worked for the Indiana State Police, then became an agent for the FBI. After retiring from law enforcement, he went into real estate.

Records Held
World Record: 2 mi. - 8:58
American Record: 10,000 m - 31:06.90

Championships
1936 Olympics: 5,000 m (13th)
1936 Olympics: 10,000 m (8th)

Education
high school: Auburn (Dekalb, Indiana), 1933
undergraduate: Indiana (Bloomington, Indiana), 1937

Occupations
Law enforcement
Real estate

Henry Laskau

Photo of Henry Laskau

Inducted: 1997, athlete

Born: September 12, 1916 - Berlin, DE
Deceased: May 7, 2000

Events
1 mi. race walk - 6:18.20
10 km race walk - 50:27
20 km race walk - 1:38:47


One of the top walkers in U.S. track and field history, Henry Laskau was in a class by himself during two decades. He was a top 15 km runner in his native Germany before being forced to leave that country in 1938. He moved to the United States and served in the U.S. Army during World War II before resuming his competitive walking career in 1946. It was a career that was to have few equals. His total of 42 national titles is one of the highest on record. He was a U.S. team competitor in the 1948, 1952 and 1956 Olympic Games, placing 12th in 1952 at 20 kilometers. He was a 1951 Pan-American Games champion and also was a four-time winner at the Maccabiah Games. During an 11-year career, he set five national records and during nine years of that period was unbeaten by any American walker. In 1983, he was named to the USA All-Time Track and Field team. He remained active in the sport after retiring from competition, serving as a volunteer official.

Championships
1952 Olympics: 20,000 m (12th)
1951 Pan-Am Games: (1st)

Fred Lebow

Photo of Fred Lebow

Inducted: 1994, event director

Born: June 6, 1932 - Transylvania, RO
Deceased: October 9, 1994


Career Highlights

  • Oversaw the growth of the New York City Marathon from 126 runners in 1970 to more than 30,000 within two decades.

To countless millions, Fred Lebow was the New York City Marathon - the perennial enthusiast and tireless organizer who oversaw the famous footrace. As president of the New York Road Runners Club and race director of the New York City Marathon, he fostered the race's growth from a mere 126 runners in 1970 to more than 30,000 by the 1990s. Born Fischel Lebowitz, Lebow was a native of Transylvania who was forced to flee from the Nazis and later from the Soviets while still in his teens. After arriving in New York City in 1951, he made his career in the textile and garment industry. He took up running in the late 1960s to improve his stamina for tennis. He subsequently ran close to 70 marathons in more than 30 countries, including the inaugural New York City Marathon. As Club president, he created such original events as the Fifth Avenue Mile and the Empire State Building Run-up. And he built the Club from 270 members in 1972 to a high of 31,000-plus, making it the world's largest organization of its kind. In early 1990, Lebow was diagnosed with brain cancer. Two years later, he ran his first five-borough marathon in celebration of his 60th birthday, completing the course with eight-time champion Grete Waitz of Norway. Lebow was placed in the Hall of Fame by a special vote of USATF's executive committee on July 18, 1994, and a subsequent waiver by the HOF's board of directors. His induction took place on Aug. 23, 1994, in special ceremonies in New York.

Occupations
Sports administration

Carl Lewis

Photo of Carl Lewis

Inducted: 2001, athlete

Born: July 1, 1961 - Birmingham, Alabama

Events
Long Jump - 8.87 m
100 m - 9.86
200 m - 19.75


Carl Lewis' achievements are unprecedented in track and field: He is one of two athletes (the other being Paavo Nurmi) to win nine Olympic gold medals. Similarly, he is one of two (the other being Al Oerter) to win four golds in the same event. He also won 10 medals, including eight golds, at the World Outdoor Championships, the most by any athlete in the world. Growing up in Willingboro, N.J., Lewis came from an athletic family, and yet he blossomed late in his high school career. In his senior year, he improved his personal best in the long jump by almost a foot, from 25' 9" to 26' 8" and ranked number five in the world. The following year, as a freshman at the University of Houston, he qualified for the Olympic team in the long jump. Because of the U.S. boycott of the Moscow Olympics, Lewis had to wait four years for his Olympic glory. By 1984, he had already ranked number one in the world in both the 100 meters and long jump for three consecutive years. In Los Angeles, he matched Jesse Owens' 1936 feat with four gold medals in the same events -- the 100m, 200m, long jump and 4x100m relay. Lewis' talent was matched by his longevity. At the 1988 Olympics, he won the 100 meters and long jump. In 1992, he again won the long jump as well as the 4x100m, anchoring the U.S. team to a world record of 37.40. In 1996, in his final Olympics, Lewis had a dramatic farewell, winning his fourth-consecutive gold medal in the long jump. At age 30, he had one of his greatest achievements, breaking the world 100m record with a time of 9.86 while winning the event at the 1991 World Championships. At that same meet, he had one of his greatest disappointments, losing his long jump streak of 65 consecutive victories to Mike Powell. It was an occasion on which Lewis recorded his longest jump ever -- 29' 1 1/4" -- while Powell was breaking Bob Beamon's legendary record with a jump of 29' 4 1/2".

Records Held
World Record: 100 m - 9.86 (August 25, 1991 - )

Championships
1984 Olympics: Long Jump (1st)
1984 Olympics: 100 m (1st)
1984 Olympics: 200 m (1st)
1984 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1988 Olympics: Long Jump (1st)
1988 Olympics: 100 m (1st)
1988 Olympics: 200 m (2nd)
1992 Olympics: Long Jump (1st)
1992 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1996 Olympics: Long Jump (1st)
1991 World Outdoors: Long Jump - 8.87 m (2nd)
1991 World Outdoors: 100 m - 9.86 (1st)

Education
high school: Willingboro (Willingboro, New Jersey), 1979
undergraduate: Houston (Houston, Texas), 1981

Occupations
Entrepreneur
Entertainer

Marty Liquori

Photo of Marty Liquori

Inducted: 1995, athlete

Born: September 11, 1949 - Cedar Grove, New Jersey

Events
1,500 m - 3:36.00
1 mi. - 3:52.20
2 mi. - 8:17
5,000 m - 13:00.06


One of only four high school runners to break four minutes for the mile, Marty Liquori attended Villanova University where he was coached by Hall of Famer Jumbo Elliott. During his freshman year, he qualified for the Olympic team at 1500 meters and advanced to the finals, where he finished 12th. While running for the Wildcats, he won three straight NCAA one mile titles from 1969 to 1971, captured National AAU one mile titles in 1969 and 1970 and collected nine straight Penn Relays titles. He was ranked number one in the world at 1500 meters in 1969 and 1971. In perhaps his most memorable race, Liquori defeated world-record holder Jim Ryun in the "Dream Mile" in the spring of 1971. Afterward Liquori described his front-running tactic by saying, "I wanted us both sagging in the stretch, looking more like boxers, both dead, like we were running on sand." That same year, Liquori won the 1500m at the Pan-American Games. After college, Liquori set four American records, including two in the 5000 within 11 days in the summer of 1977. The first was in Zurich in 13:16.0; the second was at the World Cup in Dusseldorf, Germany, where he ran 13:15.06. That year he was ranked number one in the world at 5000m. In all, Liquori won 14 national titles ranging from one mile to 5000 meters. A co-founder of the Athletic Attic chain of running stores, Liquori went on to become an author and television commentator, working with ABC-TV at the 1972, 1976 and 1984 Olympic Games.

Records Held
American Record: 2 mi. - 8:17 (July 17, 1975 - )
American Record: 5,000 m - 13:00.00
American Record: 5,000 m - 13:15.06

Championships
1968 Olympics: 1,500 m (12th)
1969 AAU: 1 mi. (1st)
1970 AAU: 1 mi. (1st)
1971 Pan-Am Games: 1,500 m (1st)
1969 NCAA: 1 mi. (1st)
1970 NCAA: 1 mi. (1st)
1971 NCAA: 1 mi. (1st)

Education
high school: Essex Catholic (Newark, New Jersey), 1967
undergraduate: Villanova (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 1971

Occupations
TV broadcaster
Author
Entrepreneur

Clyde Littlefield

Photo of Clyde Littlefield

Inducted: 1981, coach

Born: October 6, 1892 - Eldred, Pennsylvania
Deceased: May 20, 1981


The head track coach at the University of Texas in Austin for 41 years, Clyde Littlefield was on the 1952 Olympic coaching staff and during his long tenure in Austin developed some of the top sprint relay teams in the world. As a student at the University of Texas, Littlefield was an outstanding athlete, achieving all-conference honors in football, basketball and track and earning four letters in each sport. After four years of coaching at Greenville Hill School in Texas, he returned to his Alma Mater in 1920 as head track coach, freshman football coach, freshman basketball coach and physical training instructor. As the Longhorns' track coach until his retirement in 1961, he produced 25 Southwest Conference team titles, 12 national collegiate individual champions and three Olympians. His relay teams set world records in the 4x100 and 4x200-yard relays and posted world bests in the sprint and distance medley relays. Littlefield was cofounder in 1925 of the Texas Relays. He also served as the Longhorns' head football coach for six years, winning two conference titles. Littlefield was a long-time member of the NCAA track and field rules committee and president of the NCAA Track Coaches Association.

Education
high school: South Park (Beaumont, Texas), 1909
undergraduate: Texas (Austin, Texas), 1916

Occupations
Coach

Dallas Long

Inducted: 1996, athlete

Born: June 13, 1940 - Pine Bluff, Arkansas

Events
Shot Put - 20.68 m


Many Hall of Fame athletes have either won Olympic gold medals or set world records. Dr. Dallas Long has done both and was one of the world's premier shot putters in the 1960s. Long attended North Phoenix High School in Arizona, where he was coached by Vern Wolfe, also a Hall of Famer. Long set a national high school record there and later attended the University of Southern California, where he attained his greatest success and was again coached by Wolfe. He was NCAA champion for three successive years, from 1960 to 1962, and national champion in 1961. He set the first of his world records in March 1959, when he threw 63' 2". He improved upon that record five times, culminating with a throw of 67' 10" at the Olympic trials in 1964. That year, he won the gold medal with a throw of 66' 8 1/2", setting an Olympic record in the event. Four years earlier, at the 1960 Rome Olympics, Long took the bronze medal behind fellow Americans Bill Nieder and Parry O'Brien. After earning both dental and medical degrees from USC, Long practiced medicine in Southern California and Arizona.

Records Held
World Record: Shot Put - 20.68 m (July 25, 1964 - )

Championships
1960 Olympics: Shot Put (3rd)
1964 Olympics: Shot Put - 20.33 m (1st)
1961 AAU: Shot Put (1st)
1960 NCAA: Shot Put (1st)
1961 NCAA: Shot Put (1st)
1962 NCAA: Shot Put (1st)

Education
high school: North Phoenix (North Phoenix, Arizona)
undergraduate: USC (Los Angeles, California), 1962

Occupations
Dentist
Medical doctor

Madeline Manning (Mims)

Photo of Madeline Manning (Mims)

Inducted: 1984, athlete

Born: January 11, 1948 - Cleveland, Ohio

Events
800 m - 1:57.90


One of the first female American middle distance stars of world-class caliber, Madeline Manning-Mims was the 1968 Olympic 800m champion at Mexico City while attending Tennessee State University. In 1965, while a student at John Hay High School in Cleveland, she won her first national title in the 440-yard run at the girls' AAU championships and was named to the U.S. team that competed in meets against the USSR, Poland and West Germany. From 1967 to 1980, Manning-Mims won 10 national indoor and outdoor titles and set numerous American records as well. After setting a national record of 2:02.3 in 1967, she improved on that record three times, eventually running 1:57.9 in 1976. She set three world indoor records, culminating with a best of 2:02.0 in the 800m in 1969. Her 1968 Olympic victory was unexpected but decisive, as she won by more than 10 meters in an Olympic record of 2:00.9. She also was a member of the 1972 and 1976 Olympic teams and in 1980, at the age of 32, won the U.S. Olympic Trials. Only the U.S. boycott of the Moscow Games kept her out of her fourth Olympiad. Coming out of retirement three times during her career, she also won a silver medal at the 1972 Olympic Games as a member of the 4x400m relay team. She was the 1975 Pan-American champion and in 1966 won the 400 at the World University Games.

Records Held
Olympic Record: 800 m - 2:00.90
American Record: 800 m - 1:57.90

Championships
1968 Olympics: 800 m - 2:00.90 (1st)
1972 Olympics: 1,600 m relay (2nd)
1966 World University Games: 400 m (1st)
1965 AAU: 440 yd. (1st)
1975 Pan-Am Games: 400 m (1st)

Education
high school: John Hay (Cleveland, Ohio)
undergraduate: Tennessee State (Nashville, Tennessee), 1972

Occupations
Gospel singer
Lay preacher
Motivational speaker

Henry Marsh

Photo of Henry Marsh

Inducted: 2001, athlete

Born: March 15, 1954 - Boston, Massachusetts

Events
1 mi. - 3:59.31
3,000 m steeplechase - 8:09.17


One of the greatest U.S. steeplechasers of all time, Henry Marsh still holds the American record in the event (8:09.17 in 1985). A miler while in high school, Marsh became a steeplechaser at Brigham Young University. His progress was slow until 1976, when he had his first breakthrough in the event, finishing second at the NCAA championships, second at the Olympic Trials and 10th at the Olympic Games. He won his first U.S. national title in 1978, became Pan American Games champion in 1979, and was ranked number one in the world three times -- in 1981, 1982 and 1985. He also was the top-ranked U.S. steeplechaser 10 times. He set the American record four times, culminating with his still-standing record in Koblenz, Germany, in 1985. He was on the 1980, 1984 and 1988 Olympic teams, achieving his best result of fourth at the Los Angeles Games. Overall, he represented the U.S. 19 times in international competition, including the 1983 and 1987 World Championship teams. A graduate of the University of Oregon Law School, Marsh practices law, writes motivational books, and lectures on health and stress management.

Records Held
American Record: 3,000 m steeplechase - 8:09.17 (August 28, 1985 - )

Championships
1976 Olympics: 3,000 m steeplechase (10th)
1984 Olympics: 3,000 m steeplechase (4th)
1988 Olympics: 3,000 m steeplechase (6th)
1976 Olympic Trials: 3,000 m steeplechase (2nd)
1978 U.S. Outdoors: 3,000 m steeplechase (1st)
1979 Pan-Am Games: 3,000 m steeplechase (1st)
1976 NCAA: 3,000 m steeplechase (2nd)

Education
high school: Punahoa (Honolulu, Hawaii), 1972
undergraduate: Brigham Young (Provo, Utah), 1978

Occupations
Attorney

Bob Mathias

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: November 17, 1930 - Tulare, California

Events
Decathlon - 7731 pts.


One of the greatest all-around athletes in track and field history, Robert "Bob" Mathias arrived on the world track and field scene in spectacular fashion, winning the decathlon gold medal at the 1948 Olympic Games while still only 17 years old. That made him the youngest ever winner of an Olympic track and field event and also earned him the 1948 Sullivan Award as the nation's top amateur athlete. Already a member of the football, basketball and track team at Tulare High School in California, Mathias took up the decathlon at the track coach's urging, though he had never seen a javelin, no less thrown one. He learned quickly. Despite his inexperience, he qualified for the Olympic team, then won the gold medal in London. Upon his return to the small farming community of Tulare, California, Mathias was a full-fledged hero. While at Stanford University, Mathias set the first of his three world decathlon records in 1950. He capped his brilliant career by repeating as Olympic champion in 1952, winning by the largest margin in Olympic history and setting another world record. His point total of 7731 was 599 more than that of second-place finisher Milt Campbell of the U.S. (who won the event four years later). Never defeated in the decathlon, Mathias was a four-time national champion in the ten-event ordeal. Also a star fullback for the Stanford football team, he played in the 1952 Rose Bowl, making him the only person ever to compete in that event and an Olympics in the same year. After his competitive days, he was a member of the U.S. Congress from 1967 to 1975 and from 1977 to 1983 he was director of the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs. He was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1983.

Championships
1948 Olympics: Decathlon (1st)
1952 Olympics: Decathlon - 7731 pts. (1st)

Education
high school: Tulare (Tulare, California)
undergraduate: Stanford (Palo Alto, California), 1953

Occupations
Politics
Sports administration

Randy Matson

Inducted: 1984, athlete

Born: March 5, 1945 - Kilgore, Texas

Events
Shot Put - 21.77 m


While still in his teens, Randy Matson established his dominance as a shot putter and discus thrower. As a senior in high school, he had the second longest shot put and third longest discus throws in the history of these events. The following year, while a freshman at Texas A&M, Matson won the first of his six National AAU shot put titles. Later that year, he finished second to fellow Hall of Famer Dallas Long at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. During that competition, Matson set a short-lived Olympic record when he threw 66' 3 1/4" to take the lead, only to have Long surpass him with a throw of 66' 8 1/2". In 1965, Matson became the first athlete to break the 70' barrier when he threw the shot 70' 7 1/4". He again broke the world record in 1967 with 71' 5 1/4", his career best, and in 1968 won the gold medal. He barely missed making the 1972 Olympic team when he placed fourth at the Trials. A four-time national collegiate champion in both the shot and discus, he also played basketball in college. Matson won the 1967 Sullivan Award as the nation's top amateur athlete.

Records Held
World Record: Shot Put - 21.77 m (April 22, 1967 - )

Championships
1964 Olympics: Shot Put - 20.20 m (2nd)
1968 Olympics: Shot Put (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Texas A&M (College Station, Texas), 1967

Occupations
College administrator

Joe McCluskey

Photo of Joe McCluskey

Inducted: 1996, athlete

Born: June 11, 1911 - South Manchester, Connecticut
Deceased: August 31, 2002

Events
3,000 m steeplechase - 9:14.50


Fordham graduate Joseph "Joe" McCluskey ranks near the top of U.S. distance runners. During his remarkable career, he won 27 national titles in various distance events. He captured the steeplechase title a record nine times between 1930 and 1943. He also won U.S. outdoor titles in the 5000 (1935-1937) and 10,000 meters (1942). Indoors, he was the two-mile winner in 1940. He was also the 1932 national cross country champion and won the U.S. 15 km road title in 1941 and 1942. At Fordham, he won five IC4A 2-mile titles, two indoors, three outdoors. At the 1932 Olympics, McCluskey won the bronze medal in the steeplechase but was deprived of a silver medal because one of the officials failed to hold up the number of laps remaining in the race, prompting the athletes to run an extra lap. McCluskey was second at the end of the regular race but dropped back to third during the extra lap. During World War II, McCluskey served as a U.S. Navy lieutenant commander. He later spent almost 30 years as a New York City stockbroker. He coached the NYAC track team for 14 years and ran in Masters competition until he was 85.

Championships
1932 Olympics: 3,000 m steeplechase (3rd)
1936 Olympics: 3,000 m steeplechase (10th)
1935 USA Outdoors: 5,000 m (1st)
1936 USA Outdoors: 5,000 m (1st)
1937 USA Outdoors: 5,000 m (1st)
1942 USA Outdoors: 10,000 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Fordham (Bronx, New York), 1933

Occupations
Stockbroker
Coach

Mildred (Tex) McDaniel

Photo of Mildred (Tex) McDaniel

Inducted: 1983, athlete

Born: November 3, 1933 - Atlanta, Georgia

Events
High Jump - 1.76 m


One of the world's top women athletes of the 1950s, Mildred McDaniel excelled both in track and field and basketball. She acquired her nickname of "Tex" on the basketball floor because her teammates said she dribbled like a Texan. At Tuskegee Institute, where she was coached by Hall of Famer Cleve Abbott, McDaniel was the U.S. women's high jump champion in 1953, 1955 and 1956 and was the U.S. indoor champion in 1955 and 1956 as well. She also was the 1955 Pan-American Games winner with a leap of 5' 6 1/4", a meet mark that stood until 1967. Though she twice raised the U.S. high jump record during 1956, she entered the Olympic competition as an underdog. She emerged as gold medalist with a world record leap of 5' 9 1/4", a resounding 3 1/2" higher than her closest competitor. McDaniel retired following the Olympics and later became a physical education teacher in California.

Records Held
World Record: High Jump - 1.76 m (December 1, 1956 - )

Championships
1956 Olympics: High Jump - 1.76 m (1st)
1953 USA Outdoors: High Jump (1st)
1955 USA Indoors: High Jump (1st)
1955 USA Outdoors: High Jump (1st)
1956 USA Indoors: High Jump (1st)
1956 USA Outdoors: High Jump (1st)
1955 Pan-Am Games: High Jump - 1.68 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Tuskegee Institute (Tuskegee, Alabama), 1957

Occupations
Teacher

Edith McGuire

Photo of Edith McGuire

Inducted: 1979, athlete

Born: June 3, 1944 - Atlanta, Georgia

Events
100 m - 11.40
200 m - 23.05
220 yd. - 24.10


Another Tennessee State University sprinter who became an Olympic star, Edith McGuire achieved her fame at the 1964 Tokyo Games, winning a gold medal and two silvers. Her gold medal came in the 200m, in which she set an Olympic record of 23.05, capping an undefeated season in that event; she won silvers in the 100m, finishing behind Tennessee State teammate (and fellow Hall of Famer) Wyomia Tyus, and in the 4x100m relay. During her relatively short career, McGuire won four outdoor National AAU titles, taking the 200-220 title in 1964 and 1965 and the 100 and long jump crowns in 1963. She also won two AAU indoor at the 220-yard distance. She later became a school teacher in Detroit and worked with underprivileged children.

Records Held
World Record: 220 yd. - 24.10
American Record: 200 m - 23.05 (October 19, 1964 - )

Championships
1964 Olympics: 100 m (2nd)
1964 Olympics: 200 m - 23.05 (1st)
1964 Olympics: 400 m relay (2nd)
1963 AAU: Long Jump (1st)
1963 AAU: 100 m (1st)
1964 AAU: 200 m (1st)
1965 AAU: 200 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Tennessee State (Nashville, Tennessee), 1966

Occupations
Teacher

James (Ted) Meredith

Inducted: 1982, athlete

Born: November 14, 1891 - Chester Heights, Pennsylvania
Deceased: November 2, 1957

Events
400 m - 47.40
800 m - 1:51.80


James "Ted" Meredith made the 1912 Olympic team while still in high school and won the gold medal in the 800 meters, narrowly outkicking the defending champion, Mel Sheppard, in a world record time of 1:51.9. In that race, Meredith continued on to set a world record of 1:52.5 in the slightly longer 880 yards. At the 1912 Games, Meredith won another gold medal on the 4x400m relay team and was fourth in the 400m run. His success continued at the University of Pennsylvania, where he added to his world record collection. He lowered the world 880-yard record to 1:52.2 in 1916 during a dual meet between Penn and Cornell. That same year, he set a world 400m record of 47.4. A two-time AAU 440 champion, he also ran on three world record relay teams while at Penn and held several world indoor bests as well. After serving as a captain in the U.S. Aviation Corps during World War I, Meredith again made the Olympic team in 1920. On that occasion, he failed to qualify for the final of the 400m run and ran on the fourth-place 4x400m relay team. After retiring from competition, Meredith coached at his former university before going on to a career as a real estate broker.

Records Held
World Record: 400 m - 47.40 (May 27, 1916 - )
World Record: 800 m - 1:51.80 (July 8, 1912 - )

Championships
1912 Olympics: 400 m (4th)
1912 Olympics: 800 m - 1:51.80 (1st)
1912 Olympics: 1,600 m relay (1st)
1920 Olympics: 1,600 m relay (4th)

Education
high school: Mercersburg (Mercersburg, Pennsylvania), 1912
undergraduate: Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 1916

Occupations
Real estate

Ralph Metcalfe

Photo of Ralph Metcalfe

Inducted: 1975, athlete

Born: May 29, 1910 - Atlanta, Georgia
Deceased: October 10, 1979

Events
100 m - 10.30


In the early 1930s, Ralph Metcalfe was the prime U.S. sprinter, winning most of the national titles and tying the world records in the 100 and 200 meters. He competed in both the 1932 and 1936 Olympic Games, ending up with one gold medal, two silvers and a bronze. At Marquette University, Metcalfe won the national collegiate 100-200 double three straight years from 1932 to 1934. He achieved the same double victories in the national AAU meet during those years and wound up with five straight national titles in the 200-220. Overall, counting indoor competition, Metcalfe won 11 AAU sprint titles. In 1932, he won both the 100m and 200m runs at the Olympic Trials, but failed to maintain his dominance at the Los Angeles Olympics. In the 100m, he lost by an inch to fellow American (and Hall of Famer) Eddie Tolan in a controversial finish. In the 200m, he again was unlucky, since it appeared that he had been placed behind his fellow finalists at the starting line and was unable to make up the distance, finishing third to Tolan and fellow American George Simpson. In 1934, Metcalfe tied the world 100-meter record of 10.3 three times during a tour of Europe and Asia. He finally won an Olympic gold medal in the 4x100m relay at the 1936 Berlin Games after taking second to Jesse Owens in the 100. Metcalfe later coached track at Xavier College in Louisiana before becoming a successful businessman in Chicago. He began a political career in 1949, becoming an alderman for the city of Chicago before being elected to Congress in 1970.

Records Held
World Record: 100 m - 10.30 (September 23, 1934 - )

Championships
1932 Olympics: 100 m (2nd)
1932 Olympics: 200 m (3rd)
1936 Olympics: 100 m (2nd)
1936 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1932 AAU: 100 m (1st)
1932 AAU: 200 m (1st)
1933 AAU: 100 m (1st)
1933 AAU: 200 m (1st)
1934 AAU: 100 m (1st)
1934 AAU: 200 m (1st)
1935 AAU: 200 m (1st)
1936 AAU: 200 m (1st)
1932 NCAA: 100 m (1st)
1932 NCAA: 200 m (1st)
1933 NCAA: 100 m (1st)
1933 NCAA: 200 m (1st)
1934 NCAA: 100 m (1st)
1934 NCAA: 200 m (1st)

Education
high school: Tilden Technical (Chicago, Illinois), 1930
undergraduate: Marquette (Milwaukee, Wisconsin), 1936

Occupations
Coach
Businessman
Politician

Rod Milburn

Photo of Rod Milburn

Inducted: 1993, athlete

Born: May 18, 1950 - Opelousas, Louisiana
Deceased: November 11, 1997

Events
120 yd. hurdles - 13.00
110 m hurdles - 13.10


During the early 1970s, Rod Milburn dominated the 110m hurdles, setting or tying the world record five times and winning the event at the 1971 Pan-American Games and 1972 Olympics. During a semi-final race at the National AAU meet in 1971, the Southern University student won the 120-yard high hurdles in 13.0, breaking the old world record of 13.2 that was set 12 years earlier. Undefeated in 27 straight races, Milburn was named Track & Field News' Athlete of the Year for 1971. His streak ended at the 1972 Olympic Trials when he hit two hurdles and narrowly qualified for the team with a third-place finish. He regained his form in Munich, where he tied the world record of 13.24 in winning the gold medal. After 1973, he turned to professional track but regained his amateur standing in 1980 and that year was ranked fifth in the world. He continued to be world ranked until his final retirement in 1983. During his heyday, he won three national collegiate hurdles titles and four National AAU championships, two each indoors and outdoors.

Records Held
World Record: 120 yd. hurdles - 13.00 (June 25, 1971 - )
World Record: 110 m hurdles - 13.10 (July 22, 1973 - )

Championships
1972 Olympics: 110 m hurdles - 13.24 (1st)
1971 Pan-Am Games: 110 m hurdles (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Southern (Baton Rouge, Louisiana), 1972

Occupations
Coach
Industrial worker

Billy Mills

Photo of Billy Mills

Inducted: 1976, athlete

Born: June 30, 1938 - Pine Ridge, South Dakota

Events
5,000 m - 13:41.40
6 mi. - 27:12
10,000 m - 28:17.60
marathon - 2:22:55


Described as the greatest upset in Olympic history, Billy Mills' victory in the 10,000 meters at the 1964 Olympic Games will remain an indelible memory for anyone who saw his thrilling stretch run as he wove through a field of lapped runners and finally passed the race favorites, Ron Clarke and Mohamed Gammoudi. An Oglala Sioux Native American, Mills took up distance running while attending the Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas. He soon dropped his original goal of becoming a boxer and concentrated on running instead. At the University of Kansas under Hall of Fame coach Bill Easton, he was an All-American in cross country in both 1958 and 1959. After graduating from Kansas, he became a lieutenant in the Marine Corps, and finished second to Gammoudi in the 1963 interservice 10,000m run in Brussels, Belgium. The following year, he finished second to Gerry Lindgren in the 10,000 meters at the Olympic Trials. His greatest race awaited him in Tokyo. After winning the 10,000, Mills placed 14th in the Olympic marathon. The following year, Mills set a world six-mile record, running 27:11.6 in a tie with Lindgren at the AAU Nationals. Mills later became active in Native American affairs and in 1972 was named one of America's "Outstanding Young Men." A 1984 movie titled "Running Brave" was made of his life. Mills was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1984.

Records Held
World Record: 6 mi. - 27:12 (June 27, 1965 - )

Championships
1964 Olympics: 10,000 m (1st)
1964 Olympics: marathon (14th)
1965 AAU: 6 mi. - 27:12 (1st)

Education
high school: Haskell Institute (Lawrence, Kansas), 1957
undergraduate: Kansas (Lawrence, Kansas), 1962

Occupations
Public speaking, humanitarian and Native American causes

John (Jack) Moakley

Inducted: 1988, coach

Born: December 11, 1863 - Boston, Massachusetts
Deceased: May 21, 1955


Career Highlights

  • Moakley's Cornell teams won 29 IC4A championships during his 50-year career.

John "Jack" Moakley became Cornell University's first full-time track coach in 1899 and served in that position for 50 years before retiring in 1949. During that span, his Cornell teams won 29 IC4A championships, including 10 outdoors, two indoors and 17 in cross country. Moakley's most famous pupil was John Paul Jones, who held the world one-mile record from 1913 to 1915 and was a 1912 Olympian. He also developed a number of other Olympians, including gold medalists Frank Foss (pole vault, 1920), John Anderson (discus, 1932) and Henry Russell (4x100m relay, 1928). In 1920, he coached the U.S. Olympic team to a highly successful showing. His early coaching career included positions at Tufts, Brown, Maine and Wisconsin. As an athlete, he was one of the best hurdles of his time, competing for Boston Latin School and Harvard.

Education
high school: Boston Latin (Boston, Massachusetts)
undergraduate: Harvard (Cambridge, Massachusetts)

Occupations
Coach

Charles Moore

Photo of Charles Moore

Inducted: 1999, athlete

Born: August 12, 1929 - Coatesville, Pennsylvania

Events
400 m - 47.00
400 m hurdles - 50.80


One of the greatest intermediate hurdlers of all time, Charles Moore never lost a 400m hurdles race and was an innovator in the event. Before Moore came along, competitors in the event customarily took 15 strides between hurdles. However, Moore applied a principle of engineering and decided 13 strides between hurdles would offer more fluidity and power. In 1952, Moore won the gold medal in the 400m hurdles in an Olympic record time of 50.8, narrowly missing the world record despite running on a soft, rainy-soaked track. He also ran a leg on the second-place 4x400m relay team. As a student at Cornell, the versatile Moore won the 1949 NCAA 440 yard flat race and the 1951 220-yard hurdles. He also won four straight national intermediate hurdles titles and the 1952 national 600-yard indoor title. After serving as president and CEO of several multinational manufacturing companies, Moore became Cornell's athletic director from 1994 to 1999 and president of the Intercollegiate Association of Amateur Athletics of America from 1999. He has also served as a private sector member of the U.S. Olympic Committee Board of Directors.

Records Held
World Record: 400 hurdles - 50.80 (July 21, 1952 - )

Championships
1952 Olympics: 400 m hurdles - 50.80 (1st)
1952 Olympics: 1,600 m relay (2nd)
1952 AAU: 600 yd. (1st)
1949 NCAA: 440 yd. (1st)
1951 NCAA: 220 yd. hurdles (1st)

Education
high school: Mercersburg Academy (Mercersburg, Pennsylvania), 1947
undergraduate: Cornell (Ithaca, New York), 1951

Occupations
Corporate executive
Athletic director

Tom Moore

Photo of Tom Moore

Inducted: 1988, event director

Born: April 14, 1914 - Berkeley, California
Deceased: May 17, 2002


Moore was head of the USOC bid evaluation task force involved in choosing the U.S. city to be considered as host for the 2012 Olympic Games.

Championships
1935 AAU: 440 yd. hurdles (1st)

Education
undergraduate: California (Berkeley, California), 1936

Occupations
Meet director

Bobby Morrow

Photo of Bobby Morrow

Inducted: 1975, athlete

Born: October 15, 1935 - Harlingen, Texas

Events
100 m - 10.20
200 m - 20.60


The top sprinter of the middle 1950s, Bobby Morrow came from a small Texas college to emerge as one of the stars of the Melbourne Olympic Games. As a student at Abilene Christian, Morrow first attracted notice in 1955 when he won the AAU 100-yard dash title. The next year was his greatest. He started off by taking the national collegiate 100-200 sprint double, then won the AAU 100 for the second straight year. In Melbourne, he won three gold medals, taking the 100 and 200 and anchoring the winning 4x100m relay team. His success continued in 1957 when he repeated the national collegiate sprint double, also winning the Sullivan Award as the nation's top amateur athlete. In 1958, he took the AAU sprint double, the last major titles he won. Morrow tied the world records in the 100 and 200 six times (three times in each) and also ran on Abilene Christian quartets that set world records in the 4x110-yard and 4x220-yard relays in 1958. His duels with fellow Hall of Famer Dave Sime were some of the greatest in sprint history. Morrow made a comeback in 1960 and barely missed making the Olympic team. He was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1989.

Records Held
World Record: 100 m - 10.20 (June 29, 1956 - )
World Record: 200 m - 20.60 (November 27, 1956 - )

Championships
1956 Olympics: 100 m (1st)
1956 Olympics: 200 m - 20.60 (1st)
1956 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1955 AAU: 100 yd. (1st)
1956 AAU: 100 yd. (1st)
1958 AAU: 100 yd. (1st)
1958 AAU: 220 yd. (1st)
1956 NCAA: 100 m (1st)
1956 NCAA: 200 m (1st)
1957 NCAA: 100 m (1st)
1957 NCAA: 200 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Abilene Christian (Abilene, Texas), 1957

Occupations
Farmer
Merchant

Jess Mortensen

Photo of Jess Mortensen

Inducted: 1992, coach

Born: April 16, 1907 - Thatcher, Arizona
Deceased: February 19, 1962


One of the great sports figures in the history of the University of Southern California, Jess Mortensen served the Trojans successfully as both an athlete and a coach. He lettered in football, basketball and track at USC. As a track athlete, he won the NCAA javelin title in 1929 and the National AAU javelin championship in 1930. The next year, he became track coach at Riverside Junior College, where he remained, except for a break during World War II, until 1947. That year, he moved to the University of Denver in 1947, before becoming head track coach at West Point in 1950. He returned to his Alma Mater as head coach in 1951. Until his death in 1962, Mortensen coached the Trojans to seven NCAA team titles and his teams never finished worse than second in the Pacific Conference meet. His USC teams were never defeated in 64 dual meets. Mortensen coached some of the greatest athletes in the sport, including Olympic gold medalists Parry O'Brien, Jerome Biffle, Mike Larrabee, Rex Cawley, Charles Dumas, Dallas Long and Sim Iness. Many of his athletes were also world record holders, headed by O'Brien and Long who between them set 12 world outdoor shot put records. Mortensen served an assistant coach with the 1956 U.S. Olympic team.

Championships
1930 AAU: Javelin Throw (1st)
1929 NCAA: Javelin Throw (1st)

Education
undergraduate: USC (Los Angeles, California), 1929

Occupations
Coach

Edwin Moses

Photo of Edwin Moses

Inducted: 1994, athlete

Born: August 31, 1955 - Dayton, Ohio

Events
400 hurdles - 47.02


As the dominant intermediate hurdler for more than a decade, Edwin Moses authored one of the sport's most famous winning streaks. Over a span of nine years and nine months, Moses won 107 consecutive finals. What makes his feat even more extraordinary is that during his first year of running the event, he became Olympic champion. A physics major at Morehouse College, the long-striding Moses quickly developed a new technique, taking an unprecedented 13 steps between hurdles throughout a race instead of the usual 14. After qualifying for the 1976 Olympic team, he ran in his first international meet, the Montreal Games, where he won the gold medal with a world record of 47.64. The following year, Moses won the U.S. title with another world record performance (47.45). That August, West German Harald Schmid beat Moses in Berlin. Moses won his next race on September 2, 1977, and kept right on winning. He didn't lose again until June 4, 1987 (when Danny Harris beat Moses in Madrid). During that span, Moses twice set the world record (running 47.13 in 1980 and 47.02 on his birthday in 1983); won five more U.S./Olympic trials titles; took three World Cup titles; won the 1987 World Championship; and logged another Olympic gold medal in 1984. Moses missed a chance for a third Olympic triumph at the 1988 Games, taking a bronze medal in the final race of his career. Among the many honors won by Moses are the Sullivan and Jesse Owens Awards.

Records Held
World Record: 400 m hurdles - 47.02 (August 31, 1983 - )

Championships
1976 Olympics: 400 m hurdles - 47.64 (1st)
1984 Olympics: 400 m hurdles (1st)
1988 Olympics: 400 m hurdles (3rd)
1987 World Outdoors: 400 m hurdles (1st)
1977 USA Outdoors: 400 m hurdles - 47.45 (1st)

Education
high school: Fairview High School (Dayton, Ohio)
undergraduate: Morehouse (Atlanta, Georgia), 1978

Occupations
Engineering
Sports administration

Michael Murphy

Inducted: 1974, coach

Born: February 28, 1861 - Worcester County, Massachusetts
Deceased: June 5, 1913


Career Highlights

  • As coach of the NYAC, Murphy produced 10 National AAU team titles.

A three-time Olympic coach, Michael Murphy was one of the world's top track coaches at the turn of this century. His fame first came at Yale University before he moved to the University of Pennsylvania as head coach. His Yale and Penn teams won 15 IC4A titles and as coach of the New York A.C. he produced 10 National AAU team titles. He was unofficial U.S. head coach at the 1900 Olympic Games, also coaching the 1908 and 1912 Olympic teams. While at Yale, he was credited with helping to develop the crouch start for sprinters and was regarded as one of the foremost coaching innovators of his era. A coach for 26 years until his death, he was the father of George Murphy, who later became a movie actor and U.S. Senator.

Occupations
Coach

Laurence (Lon) Myers

Photo of Laurence (Lon) Myers

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: February 16, 1858 - Richmond, Virginia
Deceased: February 16, 1899

Events
100 yd. - 10.00
200 m - 22.60
440 yd. - 48.60
880 yd. - 1:55.40
1 mi. - 4:22.60


As coach of the NYAC, Murphy produced 10 National AAU team titles.

Championships
1880 AAU: 100 yd. (1st)
1880 AAU: 200 yd. (1st)
1880 AAU: 400 yd. (1st)
1880 AAU: 800 yd. (1st)

Occupations
Professional runner
Bookmaker

Larry Myricks

Photo of Larry Myricks

Inducted: 2001, athlete

Born: March 10, 1956 - Clinton, Mississippi

Events
Long Jump - 8.74 m
200 m - 20.03


His long jump duels with Carl Lewis became legendary and Larry Myricks will be remembered as one of the greatest jumpers in U.S. track and field history. While a student at the Mississippi College, Myricks broke onto the national scene in spectacular fashion in 1976, winning the NCAA title and placing second at the Olympic Trials. At the Olympics, he qualified for the final but suffered a broken foot on a warm-up jump and was forced to scratch from the final. He was still ranked sixth in the world, the first of 14 world rankings in the long jump. One of his best seasons was 1979 when he won the NCAA, U.S. National and World Cup titles and was ranked first in the world. He was also on the 1980, 1984 and 1988 Olympic teams, achieving his best-ever jump of 28' 8 1/4" at the 1988 Trials. He was fourth in the Olympics in 1984 and third in 1988. He was third at both the 1987 and 1991 World Championships and was also on the 1983 World Championship team as a 200m runner. In the 200, he was twice ranked nationally and was ranked fifth in the world in 1983.

Championships
1984 Olympics: Long Jump (4th)
1988 Olympics: Long Jump (3rd)
1979 World Cup: Long Jump (1st)
1987 World Outdoors: Long Jump (3rd)
1991 World Outdoors: Long Jump (3rd)
1976 Olympic Trials: Long Jump (2nd)
1979 USA Outdoors: Long Jump (1st)
1976 NCAA: Long Jump (1st)
1979 NCAA: Long Jump (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Mississippi College (Clinton, Mississippi), 1979

Renaldo Nehemiah

Photo of Renaldo Nehemiah

Inducted: 1997, athlete

Born: March 24, 1959 - Newark, New Jersey

Events
110 m hurdles - 12.93


During the period from 1978 until he turned to pro football in 1981, Renaldo Nehemiah was the greatest high hurdler on the planet. He was the world record holder, the first athlete to run the high hurdles in under 13 seconds, and probably would have been the 1980 Olympic champion if the U.S. had not boycotted those games. He was the world's top-ranked high hurdler four straight years, from 1978 through 1981. In 1977, as a high-school senior, Nehemiah was the national junior champion. At the University of Maryland, he won three NCAA titles, one outdoors and two indoors. He also won four national championships, including three outdoors. In 1979, he twice broke the world record, with times of 13.16 and 13.0 -- an improvement of more than 0.2 over the former record set by Alejandro Casanas of Cuba. That same year, he won the Pan-American Games title and the World Cup. Two years later, in Zurich, he again set the world record, cracking the 13-second barrier with a time of 12.93. During his tenure at Maryland, he also excelled as a relay runner on the 4x200m and 4x400m teams. Nehemiah played for the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League from 1982 to 1985. He returned to track in 1986, achieving world rankings four more times from 1988 to 1991. He was named to the U.S. team for the 1991 World Championships, but an injury kept him from competing.

Records Held
World Record: 110 m hurdles - 12.93 (August 19, 1981 - )

Championships
1979 World Cup: 110 m hurdles (1st)
1977 USA Junior Outdoors: 110 m hurdles (1st)
1979 Pan-Am Games: 110 m hurdles (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Maryland (College Park, Maryland), 1981

Occupations
Investment planning
Sports marketing

Albert (Bert) Nelson

Inducted: 1991, journalist

Born: November 17, 1921 - San Diego, California
Deceased: January 9, 1994


Growing up in California's San Joaquin Valley, Albert "Bert" Nelson ran the 880 in high school and later ran cross country as a freshman at the University of California. But it was as a chronicler of the sport that Nelson achieved fame. After serving as a naval officer during World War II, Nelson started a small newspaper in northern California. Soon after, he and his older brother Cordner began plans for a monthly track and field magazine. Working out of Bert's garage in San Bruno, they produced the first edition of their brainchild -- entitled Track & Field News -- in February 1948. It soon earned its billing as the "Bible of the Sport." Consistent with that billing, T&FN's yearly rankings are used throughout the world to gauge top performers in each event. In the 1960s, Nelson began the "Little Book" series ("Little Red Book," "Little Gold Book," etc.), some of the first publications ever to convert metric distances to imperial measurements. He established TAFNEWS Press, the nation's leading track and field publishing firm (with well over 100 titles to date). Nelson's own tome on Olympic results, Olympic Track and Field, was published in 1975. Another Nelson book, Of People and Things, includes many of the top editorial columns he produced over three decades. By 1952, Nelson started Track & Field News Tours, through which tens of thousands of fans have traveled to events like the Olympics, Pan-Am Games, Commonwealth Games and the Olympic Trials. Bert's brother, Cordner, was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1988.

Education
undergraduate: California (Berkeley, California)

Occupations
Publisher
Writer

Cordner Nelson

Inducted: 1988, journalist

Born: August 6, 1918 - San Diego, California


In 1948, Cordner Nelson and his brother Bert (also in the Hall of Fame) began publishing Track & Field News. Over the years, the magazine earned the soubriquet "The Bible of the Sport." Nelson served as editor through 1969 and continues to be a reporter for the magazine. During his years with T&FN, Nelson covered every Olympic Games from 1952 through 2000 as well as AAU, USATF and NCAA championships and U.S. Olympic Trials starting in 1948. Concurrent with the publication of T&FN, Nelson originated world ranking procedures. Today, the rankings are widely accepted worldwide as the most authentic ranking of international athletes. Long before the advent of technical publications in the U.S., Nelson researched and wrote on the subject of technique in the sport. He introduced to the U.S. many of the advanced training methods used in Europe. His interest in the literature of training, technique and theory eventually led to the founding of "Track Technique" in 1960. Nelson's publishing writings include The Jim Ryun Story, Runners and Races, The Great Ones, The Milers, Track's Greatest Champions and The Advanced Running Book.

Education
undergraduate: Pacific (Stockton, California), 1940

Occupations
Publisher
Writer

William (Parry) O'Brien

Photo of William (Parry) O'Brien

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: January 18, 1932 - Santa Monica, California

Events
Shot Put - 19.30 m


Parry O'Brien revolutionized the shot put, making the "O'Brien Style" (or "O'Brien Glide") the accepted way to throw the 16-pound ball. His method of facing the back of the circle and using a 180-degree turn to shift the weight to the front of the circle helped him improve the world record 16 times. On May 8, 1954, two days after Roger Bannister broke the four-minute mile, O'Brien became the first person to put the shot more than 60 feet. Over his career, the University of Southern California standout improved the world record from 59' 0 3/4" in 1953 to 63' 4" in 1959. During one period in the 1950s, he also won 116-straight competitions. O'Brien won two national collegiate titles in the shot put while at USC. Overall, he won 18 National AAU championships, 17 of them in the shot and one in the discus (at which he also excelled). Indoors, he won nine-straight shot titles and outdoors had a string of five. A veteran of four Olympic Games, he was the champion in 1952 and 1956, both times setting Olympic records (of 57' 1 1/2" in 1952 and of 60' 11 1/4" in 1956); in 1960, he was second to fellow American Bill Nieder; and in 1964 he was fourth. He was also the Pan-American Games champion in 1955 and 1959. He received the 1959 Sullivan Award as the nation's top amateur athlete. O'Brien later enjoyed successful careers in commercial banking, real estate in civil engineering. He began throwing again in the 1980s and set world age-group records in the shot and discus. He was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1984.

Records Held
World Record: Shot Put - 19.30 m (November 1, 1956 - )

Championships
1952 Olympics: Shot Put - 17.41 m (1st)
1956 Olympics: Shot Put - 18.57 m (1st)
1960 Olympics: Shot Put (2nd)
1964 Olympics: Shot Put (4th)
1955 Pan-Am Games: Shot Put (1st)
1959 Pan-Am Games: Shot Put (1st)

Education
undergraduate: USC (Los Angeles, California), 1953

Occupations
Banker
Civil engineer

Al Oerter

Photo of Al Oerter

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: August 19, 1936 - Astoria, New York
Deceased: October 1, 2007

Events
Discus Throw - 69.45 m


The greatest competitor ever to compete in the discus, Al Oerter participated in four Olympics, always as the underdog, and always came out the winner. Each time, he set an Olympic record in the event. A native of Astoria, N.Y., Oerter won his first gold medal in 1956 while he was a student at the University of Kansas, upsetting fellow American Fortune Gordien and throwing an Olympic record 184' 11". Four years later, at the Olympic Trials, he suffered his first defeat in more than two years when he lost to Rink Babka of the U.S. At the Rome Olympics, he topped Babka with an Olympic record throw of 194' 2". The drama continued at the 1964 Olympics, where Oerter was an underdog to Ludvik Danek of Czechoslovakia, who had won 45 straight competitions. Suffering from a disc injury and torn cartilage in his lower ribs, Oerter was given little chance. On his fifth throw, after removing his neck harness, Oerter became the first thrower to surpass 200' in winning his third gold medal. He won his fourth gold in 1968, throwing a record 212' 6" and upsetting Danek and world record-holder (and Hall of Famer) Jay Silvester. At Kansas, where he was coached by Hall of Famer Bill Easton, Oerter won two national collegiate titles. He also won six National AAU titles, improved the world discus record four times and was the 1959 Pan-American Games champion. After retiring in 1968, he returned eight years later to challenge for the 1980 and 1984 Olympic teams. Incredibly, in 1980, he achieved his best-ever throw of 227' 10 1/2" at age 43. Oerter was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1983.

Records Held
Olympic Record: Discus Throw - 56.36 m
Olympic Record: Discus Throw - 59.18 m

Championships
1956 Olympics: Discus Throw - 56.36 m (1st)
1960 Olympics: Discus Throw - 59.18 m (1st)
1964 Olympics: Discus Throw (1st)
1968 Olympics: Discus Throw - 64.78 m (1st)
1959 Pan-Am Games: Discus Throw (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Kansas (Lawrence, Kansas), 1958

Occupations
Computer specialist

Harold Osborn

Photo of Harold Osborn

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: April 13, 1899 - Butler, Illinois
Deceased: April 5, 1975

Events
High Jump - 2.03 m
Decathlon - 7711 pts.


Harold Osborn earned his place in track and field history at the 1924 Olympics when he became the only athlete to win the high jump and the decathlon in Olympic competition. A graduate of the University of Illinois, Osborn was a keep student of form who modified the western roll technique by developing an efficient side-to-the-bar clearance, which paid off in height and consistency. Osborn's career spanned 16 years and included world records in both the high jump and the decathlon. He set his high jump record of 6' 8" at a pre-Olympic meet in Urbana, Ill., in 1924. That same year, at the Olympics, he achieved his world record of 7711 points in the decathlon. He also competed in the 1928 Olympic high jump but placed fifth. Osborn tied for the 1922 national collegiate high jump title and in AAU competition won six high jump titles outright, including four indoors, and tied for another. He also won three AAU decathlon titles and overall captured 18 AAU titles in nine different events. He later became an osteopath and helped coach the University of Illinois track team.

Records Held
World Record: High Jump - 2.03 m (May 27, 1924 - )

Championships
1924 Olympics: High Jump (1st)
1924 Olympics: Decathlon - 7711 pts. (1st)
1928 Olympics: High Jump (5th)
1922 NCAA: High Jump (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Illinois (Champaign, Illinois), 1922

Occupations
Teacher
Osteopath

Jesse Owens

Photo of Jesse Owens

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: September 12, 1913 - Danville, Alabama
Deceased: March 31, 1980

Events
Long Jump - 8.13 m
100 yd. - 9.40
100 m - 10.20
200 m - 20.30


Jesse Owens is best remembered as the sprinter and long jumper who won four gold medals at the politically charged 1936 Berlin Olympics. And yet his greatest day as an athlete was May 25, 1935, when he set five world records and tied another in a span of just 45 minutes to pace Ohio State University at the Big Ten Championships. Owens set world records in the 220 yards and 200 meters straightaway, 220-yard and 200m low hurdles on a straightaway and the long jump, and tied the world record at 100 yards. His long jump mark of 26' 8 1/2" stood for the next 25 years. At the 1936 Olympics, he won the 100, 200 and long jump and ran on the winning 4x100m relay team. In the 200m and long jump, he set Olympic records and the relay team set a world record. Owens first came to national attention at East Tech High School in Cleveland, Ohio (the same school that produced fellow Hall of Famers Dave Albritton and Harrison Dillard), setting national high school records in the 100 and 220-yard dashes and the long jump. At Ohio State University, where he was coached by Hall of Famer Larry Snyder, Owens won eight national collegiate titles, scoring quadruple victories in both 1935 and 1936 in the 100, 220, low hurdles and long jump. During that same time, he also won six National AAU titles, five of them in the long jump. He later became a businessman and public speaker on motivational topics. Owens was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1976 and elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1983.

Records Held
World Record: Long Jump - 8.13 m (May 25, 1935 - )
World Record: 100 yd. - 9.40 (May 25, 1935 - )
World Record: 100 m - 10.20 (June 20, 1936 - )
World Record: 200 m - 20.30 (May 25, 1935 - )

Championships
1936 Olympics: Long Jump (1st)
1936 Olympics: 100 m (1st)
1936 Olympics: 200 m (1st)
1936 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1935 Big Ten: Long Jump - 8.13 m (1st)
1935 Big Ten: 100 yd. - 9.40 (1st)
1935 Big Ten: 200 m - 20.30 (1st)
1935 Big Ten: 200 m hurdles (1st)
1935 Big Ten: 220 yd. (1st)
1935 Big Ten: 220 yd. hurdles (1st)
1935 NCAA: Long Jump (1st)
1935 NCAA: 100 yd. (1st)
1935 NCAA: 200 m hurdles (1st)
1935 NCAA: 220 yd. (1st)
1936 NCAA: Long Jump (1st)
1936 NCAA: 100 yd. (1st)
1936 NCAA: 200 m hurdles (1st)
1936 NCAA: 220 yd. (1st)

Education
high school: East Tech (Cleveland, Ohio), 1933
undergraduate: Ohio State (Columbus, Ohio), 1936

Occupations
Businessman
Motivational speaker

Charley Paddock

Photo of Charley Paddock

Inducted: 1976, athlete

Born: August 11, 1900 - Gainesville, Texas
Deceased: July 21, 1943

Events
100 m - 10.40
200 m - 21.00


The "World's Fastest Human" in the early 1920s, Charley Paddock was noted for his unusual finishing style of leaping at the tape. But there was more to Paddock than his finish, as evidenced by his world records and his three gold medals. Paddock first came to international attention when he won the 100 and 200m dashes at the 1919 Inter-Allied Games in Paris following World War I. Under the coaching of Hall of Famer Dean Cromwell, he flourished at the University of Southern California, setting world records of 10.4 in the 100m dash and 21.0 for the 200 meters. He competed in three Olympic Games, starting in 1920 when he won gold medals in the 100m dash and 4x100m relay and was second in the 200m dash. In 1924, he again ran on the winning sprint relay team after taking fifth in the 100 and second in the 200. He later competed in the 1928 Games but failed to qualify for the finals of the 200. Paddock also won five National AAU sprint titles, three of them in the 220-yard dash. He also set several records in unofficial events such as 110 yards, 135 yards, and 250 meters. Later a movie actor, he died in a plane crash in World War II while serving in the Marines.

Records Held
World Record: 100 m - 10.40 (April 23, 1921 - )
World Record: 200 m - 21.00

Championships
1920 Olympics: 100 m (1st)
1920 Olympics: 200 m (2nd)
1920 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1924 Olympics: 100 m (5th)
1924 Olympics: 200 m (2nd)
1924 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)

Education
undergraduate: USC (Los Angeles, California)

Occupations
Actor
Newspaper manager

Mel Patton

Inducted: 1985, athlete

Born: November 16, 1924 - Los Angeles, California

Events
100 yd. - 9.30
100 m - 10.30
220 yd. - 20.20


Just after World War II, the "World's Fastest Human" was Melvin "Mel" Patton. "Pell Mell," as he was nicknamed in the late 1940s, made his mark in track and field while a student at the University of Southern California, where he was coached by Hall of Famer Dean Cromwell. The tall, thin (6' 0", 148-pound) Trojan won the national collegiate 100-yard dash title in 1947 and in 1948 and 1949 he completed the 100-200 sprint double at that same meet. In 1947, he tied the world 100-yard dash record of 9.4, then lowered it to 9.3 the following year. The year 1948 was a bittersweet one for Patton. In the 100m dash at the Olympic Trials, he suffered a rare loss to fellow Hall of Famer Barney Ewell. Despite the loss, he was co-favorite to win the event at the Olympic Games, but placed only fifth. He atoned for that disappointment by taking gold medals in the 200 and 4x100m relay. In 1949, Patton set a 220-yard world record on a straightaway of 20.2, breaking a record set 14 years earlier by Jesse Owens. After retiring from competition, he became a track coach before entering the electronics industry.

Records Held
World Record: 100 yd. - 9.30 (May 15, 1948 - )
World Record: 220 yd. - 20.20 (May 7, 1949 - )

Championships
1948 Olympics: 100 m (5th)
1948 Olympics: 200 m (1st)
1948 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1947 NCAA: 100 yd. (1st)
1948 NCAA: 100 m (1st)
1948 NCAA: 200 m (1st)
1949 NCAA: 100 m (1st)
1949 NCAA: 200 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: USC (Los Angeles, California), 1949

Occupations
Coach
Electronics representative

Eulace Peacock

Photo of Eulace Peacock

Inducted: 1987, athlete

Born: August 27, 1914 - Dothan, Alabama
Deceased: December 13, 1996

Events
Long Jump - 8.00 m
100 m - 10.30


One of the world's top sprinters and long jumpers during a 15-year span in the 1930s and 1940s, Eulace Peacock achieved his greatest fame just prior to World War II. His speed and jumping ability rivaled that of Jesse Owens, his top rival during that period. An All-State Athlete in football, basketball and track while at Union High School in New Jersey, Peacock narrowed his focus to track and field when he entered Temple University. After tying the world 100m record of 10.3 in 1934, he staked his claim to track and field stardom with two major upsets in 1935. He won the AAU 100 that year in a wind-aided 10.2, defeating a field that included Hall of Famers Owens and Ralph Metcalfe. He followed that with a long jump victory over Owens, leaping 26' 3" for a career best. During the next several days, he defeated Owens twice more in the sprints. Overall, he bested Owens seven of 10 times in the sprints and long jump. He lost his chance for Olympic glory in 1936 when a pulled thigh muscle kept him off the Olympic team. A versatile athlete, he also won the AAU pentathlon title six times between 1933 and 1945. Following his retirement, he remained active in the sport as a certified official.

Records Held
World Record: 100 m - 10.30 (August 6, 1934 - )

Championships
1935 AAU: Long Jump - 8.00 m (1st)
1935 AAU: 100 m - 10.20 (1st)

Education
high school: Union (Union, New Jersey), 1933
undergraduate: Temple (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 1937

Occupations
Instructor
Coach
Businessman

Steve Prefontaine

Photo of Steve Prefontaine

Inducted: 1976, athlete

Born: January 25, 1951 - Coos Bay, Oregon
Deceased: May 30, 1975

Events
1,500 m - 3:38.10
1 mi. - 3:54.60
2 mi. - 8:18
3 mi. - 12:51
5,000 m - 13:21.87
10,000 m - 27:43.60


Steve Prefontaine was a major reason that Eugene, Oregon, became the unofficial running capital of the U.S. One of the University of Oregon's greatest athletes, Prefontaine was better known as "Pre" to the crowds that chanted his name as he ran. While at Oregon, he won six national collegiate distance titles, including cross country, under Hall of Fame coaches Bill Bowerman and Bill Dellinger. He also won two AAU crowns and set 15 American records at every distance from two miles through 10,000 meters. He was also an outstanding distance runner at Marshfield High School in Coos Bay and some of his high school records still stand. In all, he won 119 of 151 outdoor track races, including his high school performances. Even his rare losses were run with flair and determination. One of the most memorable of them was the 5000m final at the 1972 Olympics, where 21-year-old Prefontaine boldly took the lead with four laps to go and pushed the pace, only to lose a medal in the final strides of the race. Three years later, a fatal automobile accident cut short his career.

Records Held
American Record: 2 mi. - 8:18 (July 18, 1974 - )
American Record: 3 mi. - 12:51 (June 8, 1974 - )
American Record: 5,000 m - 13:21.87 (June 26, 1974 - )
American Record: 10,000 m - 27:43.60 (April 27, 1974 - )

Championships
1972 Olympics: 5,000 m (4th)

Education
high school: Marshfield (Coos Bay, Oregon), 1969
undergraduate: Oregon (Eugene, Oregon), 1973

Occupations
Athlete

Meyer Prinstein

Inducted: 2000, athlete

Born: - , PO
Deceased: March 10, 1925

Events
Long Jump - 7.50 m


A member of the 1900, 1904 and 1906 Olympic teams, Meyer Prinstein was the world's greatest horizontal jumper at the turn of the 20th century. A graduate of Syracuse University, Prinstein first came to national prominence when he set an American long jump record of 23' 7 1/4" in 1898. Two years later, he captured the world record with a jump of 24' 7 1/4". He was also a four-time national champion in the long jump. At the 1900 Olympics, Prinstein led the qualifiers in the long jump. However, he wound up second in the event because the official in charge of the Syracuse athletes prohibited Prinstein from competing in the final, which was held on a Sunday -- even though he was Jewish and had no religious reason for not competing. The winner was fellow American (and Hall of Famer) Alvin Kraenzlein. A day later, Prinstein won the triple jump with an Olympic record of 47' 5 3/4". In 1904, he became the only athlete to win both the long jump and triple jump at the same Olympics. He displayed his versatility by taking fifth in the 400 meters. At the 1906 Athens Olympics, Prinstein again won the long jump and was 22nd in the triple jump. After retiring from competition, Prinstein became a lawyer.

Records Held
World Record: Long Jump - 7.50 m
Olympic Record: Triple Jump - 14.47 m
American Record: Long Jump - 7.19 m

Championships
1900 Olympics: Triple Jump - 14.47 m (1st)
1900 Olympics: Long Jump (2nd)
1904 Olympics: Long Jump (1st)
1904 Olympics: Triple Jump (1st)
1904 Olympics: 400 m (5th)
1906 Olympics: Long Jump (1st)
1906 Olympics: Triple Jump (22nd)

Education
undergraduate: Syracuse (Syracuse, New York)

Occupations
Attorney

Joie Ray

Photo of Joie Ray

Inducted: 1976, athlete

Born: April 13, 1894 - Kankakee, Illinois
Deceased: May 15, 1978

Events
1,000 m - 2:29.60
1 mi. - 4:12.00
3,000 m - 8:31.20
5,000 m - 14:54.60


At 5' 5" and 118 pounds, short, stocky Joie Ray was one of the most versatile distance runners of the 1920s, being able to run competitively at any distance from the one mile to the marathon. Nicknamed "Chesty," Ray won 13 National AAU titles during his career, including eight in the outdoor mile while representing the Illinois A.C. He was a member of three Olympic teams. He was eighth in the Olympic 1500m in 1920, took a bronze medal in the 3000m team race in 1924 and ran two events in 1928, placing 14th in the 10,000m and fifth in the marathon. Ray was a stellar runner indoors, winning the Millrose Games' featured Wanamaker 1 1/2 mile run seven times in eight years from 1917 through 1924 and setting world records in three of those races. He finally lost his Wanamaker 1 1/2 mile title in 1925 to the legendary Paavo Nurmi of Finland. That same year, Ray tied the world indoor mile record of 4:12.0. He also was a member of the 4x1-mile relay team that set a world record.

Records Held
World Record: 1 mi. - 4:12.00

Championships
1920 Olympics: 1,500 m (8th)
1924 Olympics: 3,000 m (3rd)
1928 Olympics: 10,000 m (14th)
1928 Olympics: marathon (5th)

Occupations
Taxi Driver

Greg Rice

Photo of Greg Rice

Inducted: 1977, athlete

Born: January 3, 1916 - Missoula, Montana
Deceased: May 19, 1991

Events
2 mi. - 8:51
3 mi. - 14:13


Only 5' 5", Greg Rice was nicknamed "Little Dynamite" and the University of Notre Dame graduate dominated the distance running scene in the early 1940s. At one point, he won 55-straight races and his exploits earned him the 1940 Sullivan Award as the nation's top amateur athlete. Rice was particularly dominant indoors. Overall, he lowered the world indoor bests for the two and three miles eight times. He improved the record in the two-mile run by more than six seconds from March 1940, when he clocked 8:56.2, to March 1943, when he ran 8:51.0. During his career, he won nine national titles, including five outdoors. As an undergraduate at Notre Dame, Rice was a six-time All-American and two-time winner of the NCAA two-mile run (in 1937 and 1939). Like many during that period, Rice was prevented from competing in the Olympics because of the outbreak of World War II. Rice's last race occurred at the 1943 National AAU outdoor championships when he lost to Sweden's Gundar Haegg. Rice remained active in track for many years as an official.

Records Held
American Record: 3 mi. - 14:13 (December 28, 1941 - )

Championships
1937 NCAA: 2 mi. (1st)
1939 NCAA: 2 mi. (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Notre Dame (South Bend, Indiana), 1939

Bob Richards

Inducted: 1975, athlete

Born: February 20, 1926 - Champaign, Illinois

Events
Pole Vault - 4.73 m
Decathlon - 7313 pts.


The "Vaulting Vicar" as he was known in his competitive days, the Rev. Robert "Bob" Richards was a versatile athlete who made three Olympic teams in two events. He competed in the 1948, 1952 and 1956 Games as a pole vaulter and also was a decathlete in 1956. The second man to pole vault 15 feet, he was the Olympic pole vault gold medalist in 1952 and 1956 after winning the bronze medal in 1948. He also was 13th in the 1956 Olympic decathlon. While a student at the University of Illinois, Richards tied for the national collegiate pole vault title and followed that with 20 National AAU titles, including 17 in the pole vault. The only two-time Olympic gold medal winner in the pole vault, Richards was virtually unbeatable indoors, winning the pole vault at the Millrose Games 11 consecutive times. He later became involved in physical fitness and continued to vault in his later years. Richards had two sons who also were outstanding pole vaulters and one, Brandon, held the national high school record. An ordained minister, Richards was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1983.

Championships
1948 Olympics: Pole Vault (3rd)
1952 Olympics: Pole Vault (1st)
1956 Olympics: Pole Vault (1st)
1956 Olympics: Decathlon (13th)

Education
undergraduate: Illinois (Champaign, Illinois), 1947

Occupations
Minister

Louise Ritter

Photo of Louise Ritter

Inducted: 1995, athlete

Born: February 18, 1958 - Dallas, Texas

Events
High Jump - 2.03 m


The premier women's high jumper in the United States for a decade from 1979 to 1989, Dorothy Louise Ritter surprised the world by winning the gold medal at the 1988 Olympics in Seoul. She won the event in a jump-off against Stefka Kostadinova of Bulgaria, the world record-holder and favorite. But Ritter's credentials were impressive in their own right. Starting in 1979, she raised the American record from 6' 4 1/4" to the present mark of 6' 8". She was on three Olympic teams, including 1988, and was third at the 1983 World Outdoor Championships. Ritter won 10 national championships, indoors and outdoors, and was world-ranked nine times, including her best placing of second in 1988. A graduate of Texas Woman's University, where she was the national collegiate champion, she also starred in basketball. She previously was one of the nation's best high school jumpers, clearing 5' 11 1/2" at Red Oak (Texas) High School in 1976. She later became assistant track coach at Southern Methodist University and head track coach at Texas Tech.

Records Held
American Record: High Jump - 2.03 m (July 8, 1988 - )

Championships
1984 Olympics: High Jump (8th)
1988 Olympics: High Jump (1st)
1983 World Outdoors: High Jump (3rd)

Education
high school: Red Oak (Red Oak, Texas)
undergraduate: Texas Woman's (Denton, Texas), 1981

Occupations
Coach

Arnie Robinson

Inducted: 2000, athlete

Born: April 7, 1948 - San Diego, California

Events
Long Jump - 8.35 m


The 1970 NCAA long jump champion while at San Diego State, Arnie Robinson achieved his greatest fame in his post-college years. A winner of the 1972 and 1976 Olympic Trials long jump, Robinson was third at the 1972 Olympic Games and took the gold medal in 1976. He was the 1971 Pan American Games champion and was second in 1975. A veteran of 10 international competitions, Robinson was also the first World Cup long jump champion in 1977. Overall, he won seven national long jump titles, six of them outdoors. From 1976 to 1978, he was the top-ranked long jumper in the world with a career best of 27' 4 3/4" in 1976. He retired after the 1979 season but maintained his interest in the sport and became a successful coach at Mesa Junior College beginning in 1982. Robinson was seriously injured in an auto accident on August 19, 2000, but recovered to become coach of the jumpers at the 2003 World Championships.

Championships
1972 Olympics: Long Jump (3rd)
1976 Olympics: Long Jump (1st)
1977 World Cup: Long Jump (1st)
1971 Pan-Am Games: Long Jump (1st)
1975 Pan-Am Games: Long Jump (2nd)
1970 NCAA: Long Jump (1st)

Education
high school: Morse (San Diego, California)
junior college: San Diego Mesa College
undergraduate: San Diego State (San Diego, California), 1971

Occupations
Coach

Elizabeth (Betty) Robinson (Schwartz)

Photo of Elizabeth (Betty) Robinson (Schwartz)

Inducted: 1977, athlete

Born: August 23, 1911 - Riverdale, Illinois
Deceased: May 17, 1999

Events
100 yd. - 11.20
100 m - 12.00
220 yd. - 25.10


Elizabeth "Betty" Robinson was just 16 years old when she became the first woman to win a track event in an Olympic Games, capturing the100 meters at the 1928 Games. She also had a silver medal in 1928 as a member of the 4x100m relay and won a gold medal on the 4x100m relay at the 1936 Olympics. While still in high school, she tied the world record of 12.2 for 100 meters in 1927 and then broke that record with a time of 12.0 prior to the Olympic Games. A graduate of Northwestern University and a member of the powerful Illinois Women's A.C., Robinson was a two-time National AAU champion in 1929, winning both the 50 and 100 meters. In 1931, she set a world record at 200m/220 yards in the same race, with a winning time of 25.1. She missed a few years of competition in the early 1930s because of injuries suffered in a 1931 plane crash. However, she returned to competition as a member of the Olympic relay team in 1936. The first woman to receive a varsity "N" from Northwestern, she later kept active in the sport as a timekeeper.

Records Held
World Record: 100 m - 12.00 (June 2, 1928 - )
American Record: 100 yd. - 11.20 (July 27, 1929 - )
American Record: 220 yd. - 25.10 (June 20, 1931 - )

Championships
1928 Olympics: 100 m (1st)
1928 Olympics: 400 m relay (2nd)
1936 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1929 AAU: 50 m (1st)
1929 AAU: 100 m (1st)

Education
high school: Thornton Township (Harvey, Illinois), 1929
undergraduate: Northwestern (Evanston, Illinois)

Occupations
Homemaker
Motivational speaker

Bill Rodgers

Inducted: 1999, athlete

Born: December 23, 1947 - Hartford, Connecticut

Events
15,000 m - 43:39.08
25,000 m - 1:14:12.00
marathon - 2:09:27


A four-time winner of both the Boston and New York City marathons, Bill Rodgers was one of the prime movers in the American distance running boom of the 1970s. He took up distance running on a serious note at Wesleyan University but stopped in 1970. After being inspired by seeing Frank Shorter win the 1972 Olympic marathon, Rodgers came out of retirement and blossomed in 1975 when he finished third in the World Cross Country Championships. A month later, he won the Boston Marathon. He culminated his year ranked number-one in the world by Track & Field News and was runner-up for the Sullivan Award for the nation's outstanding amateur athlete. In 1976, Rodgers ran the marathon at the Montreal Olympics but a cramp dropped him to 40th place. He dominated U.S. distance running for the rest of the decade, winning four national distance titles and setting a pair of American marathon records. He set a personal best of 2:09.27 while winning the 1979 Boston Marathon. Over a five-year period from 1975 through 1979, he was ranked first in the world three times and second on another occasion. As a master's athlete, Rodgers has set age group records at various distances from 5000 meters and the half-marathon.

Records Held
World Record: 25,000 m - 1:00:14.12 (February 21, 1979 - )
American Record: 15,000 m - 43:39.08 (August 9, 1977 - )

Championships
1976 Olympics: marathon (40th)

Education
high school: Newington (Newington, Connecticut), 1966
undergraduate: Wesleyan (Middletown, Connecticut), 1970

Occupations
Sporting goods entrepreneur
Public speaker
Writer

Ralph Rose

Inducted: 1976, athlete

Born: March 17, 1885 - Healdsburg, California
Deceased: October 16, 1913

Events
Shot Put - 15.54 m


A giant of a man at 6' 5 1/2" and 250 pounds, Ralph Rose was the first shot putter to break 50 feet. His world record of 51' 0", set in 1909, lasted for 16 years. In 1904, while at the University of Michigan, he won both the shot put and discus at the Big Ten championships. He subsequently competed for the San Francisco Olympic Club and won seven National AAU titles in the shot, discus and javelin. A competitor in three Olympic Games, Rose compiled a medal total of three golds, two silver and one bronze. At the 1904 Paris Olympics, he won the shot, was second in the discus, third in the hammer throw and sixth in the 56-pound weight throw. Four years later, he repeated as the shot put champion. In 1912, he won the two-handed shot put (throwing a total of 90' 10 1/2" with his right and left hands), took second in the regular shot, ninth in the hammer and 11th in the discus.

Records Held
World Record: Shot Put - 15.54 m (August 21, 1909 - )

Championships
1904 Olympics: Shot Put (1st)
1904 Olympics: Discus Throw (2nd)
1904 Olympics: Hammer Throw (3rd)
1904 Olympics: 56-pound Weight Throw (6th)
1908 Olympics: Shot Put (1st)
1912 Olympics: Shot Put (2nd)
1912 Olympics: Two-handed Shot Put - 27.70 m (1st)
1912 Olympics: Hammer Throw (9th)
1912 Olympics: Discus Throw (11th)
1904 Big Ten: Shot Put (1st)
1904 Big Ten: Discus Throw (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Michigan (Ann Arbor, Michigan), 1905

Melvin (Mel) Rosen

Inducted: 1995, coach

Born: March 24, 1928 - Bronx, New York


An outstanding coach during his 28 years as head coach at Auburn University, Melvin "Mel" Rosen was also a noted international coach in both Olympic Games and World Championship competition. He was an assistant coach of the 1984 Olympic team and became head coach with the 1992 team. He also was head coach of the 1987 World Outdoor Championship team. A 1950 graduate of the University of Iowa, Rosen coached there as an assistant for three years before moving to Auburn in 1955. He became the school's second head coach in 1963 and went on to produce one of the top collegiate coaching records in the nation. At Auburn, he coached seven Olympians and 143 All-Americans. In 1978, he was NCAA Coach of the Year, both indoors and outdoors. He repeated as NCAA Indoor Coach of the Year in 1980. From 1977 to 1980, his teams won four-straight Southeastern Conference indoor titles. He was active in USA Track & Field, serving as men's track and field committee chairman and receiving the 1994 Robert Giegengack Award for outstanding service to the organization. In 1993, Rosen was inducted into the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame.

Education
undergraduate: Iowa (Iowa City, Iowa), 1950

Occupations
Coach

Wilma Rudolph

Photo of Wilma Rudolph

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: June 23, 1940 - Clarksville, Tennessee
Deceased: November 12, 1994

Events
100 m - 11.20
200 m - 22.90


At 5' 11" and 130 pounds, Wilma Rudolph was grace in motion -- and what motion! After overcoming polio in childhood, she became an unbeaten sprinter and member of the basketball team at Burt High School in Clarksville, Tenn. She was just 16 when she qualified for the Olympic team in the 200 meters. At the 1956 Melbourne Olympics, she won a bronze medal in the 4x100m relay but failed to qualify in the 200. A year later, she entered Tennessee State University, where she was coached by Hall of Famer Ed Temple. She soon became the world's best sprinter, setting world records in the 100, 200 and 4x100m relay. At the 1960 Rome Olympics, Rudolph became the first American woman to win three gold medals (in the 100m, 200m and 4x100m relays). Winner of seven National AAU sprint titles, she received the 1961 Sullivan Award as the nation's top amateur athlete. She retired at the age of 22 after winning the 100 meters and anchoring the winning U.S. 4x100m relay team in the USA-USSR dual meet at Stanford University. Rudolph later became active in youth work, heading the Wilma Rudolph Foundation. She also became a motivational speaker and, in 1987, became head track coach at DePauw University. She was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1983.

Records Held
World Record: 100 m - 11.20 (July 19, 1961 - )
World Record: 200 m - 22.90 (July 9, 1960 - )

Championships
1956 Olympics: 400 m relay (3rd)
1960 Olympics: 100 m (1st)
1960 Olympics: 200 m (1st)
1960 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)

Education
high school: Burt (Clarksville, Tennessee), 1957
undergraduate: Tennessee State (Nashville, Tennessee), 1963

Occupations
Youth work
Motivational speaker
Coach

Jim Ryun

Inducted: 1980, athlete

Born: April 29, 1947 - Wichita, Kansas

Events
800 m - 1:44.90
1,500 m - 3:33.10
1 mi. - 3:51.10
2 mi. - 8:25


The first high school runner to break 4 minutes in the one-mile run, Jim Ryun had yet to graduate from East High School in Wichita, Kans., when he made his first Olympic team in 1964. A year later, he set the American record of 3:55, beating Olympic champion Peter Snell of New Zealand. While at the University of Kansas, he became world record holder in the 800 yards and one-mile run at age 19 and gained the 1500m record the following year. In all, Ryun set six world records and held the world mile record for nine years and U.S. mile record for 14 years. He won three National AAU one-mile titles and five national collegiate titles, four of them indoors. In 1967, he received the Sullivan Award as the nation's top amateur athlete. Although ill with mononucleosis in 1968, he made the Olympic team and fought off the rarefied air of Mexico City to take the silver medal in the 1500. He retired in 1969 but came back in 1971 and a year later, qualified for the Olympic team at 1500 meters. However, a fall at Munich ended his medal hopes. He turned professional in 1973 and later went into politics, becoming a U.S. Representative from Kansas.

Records Held
World Record: 1,500 m - 3:33.10 (July 8, 1967 - )
World Record: 1 mi. - 3:51.10 (June 23, 1967 - )

Championships
1968 Olympics: 1,500 m (2nd)

Education
high school: East (Wichita, Kansas), 1965
undergraduate: Kansas (Lawrence, Kansas), 1970

Occupations
U.S. Congressman

Alberto Salazar

Inducted: 2001, athlete

Born: August 7, 1958 - Havana, CU

Events
5,000 m - 13:11.93
10,000 m - 27:25.61
marathon - 2:08:13


Havana-born Alberto Salazar had his first running success at Wayland (Mass.) High School, before embarking on an outstanding career at the University of Oregon. While running for the Ducks under Hall of Fame coach Bill Dellinger, Salazar helped Oregon win the 1977 NCAA title. He was still in college when he moved up from running on the track to the formidable challenge of the marathon. In 1980, he won his first New York City Marathon in 2:09.41 -- a world-record debut at the time. The next two years, he repeated as winner of the New York City Marathon. His 1981 victory broke the 12-year-old world best with a 2:08.13 time but the race was found to be short. One of his most memorable victories came in the 1982 Boston Marathon when he and fellow American Dick Beardsley ran virtually stride for stride until Salazar's finishing kick brought him a course record of 2:08.52. As a member of the 1984 U.S. Olympic team, Salazar placed 15th in the marathon. Though best remembered for his marathoning exploits, he also excelled on the track, setting American records in the 5000 (13:11.93) and the 10,000 (27:25.61). Overall, he set eight U.S. records and won a silver medal in the 1982 world cross country championships. Salazar was elected to the National Long Distance Running Hall of Fame in 2000. He has worked as a restaurateur, coach and advisor for Nike.

Records Held
American Record: 5,000 m - 13:11.93 (July 6, 1982 - )
American Record: 10,000 m - 27:25.61 (June 26, 1982 - )

Championships
1984 Olympics: marathon (15th)

Education
high school: Wayland (Wayland, Massachusetts), 1976
undergraduate: Oregon (Eugene, Oregon), 1981

Occupations
Coach
Running entrepreneur

Kate (Kate the Great) Schmidt

Photo of Kate (Kate the Great) Schmidt

Inducted: 1994, athlete

Born: December 29, 1953 - Long Beach, California

Events
Javelin Throw - 69.32 m


Kate Schmidt had the good luck to grow up in Long Beach, Calif., a mecca of javelin throwing during the 1960s. A year after she took up the event, she almost made the Olympic team in 1968 at age 14 and won the woman's nationals the following year. Nicknamed "Kate the Great" with good reason, she totally dominated the American women's javelin throwing scene for a decade. She broke the American javelin record 10 times, culminating with a throw of 227' 5" that has held up as the record for more than a quarter century. At the time, that throw was a world record and established her place on the international scene. Schmidt was third at the 1972 and 1976 Olympic Games and was also a member of the 1980 Olympic team that didn't compete. She just missed making the 1984 team when she placed fourth. She won seven national titles and placed in the top three in 12 of 13 national championships from 1972 to 1984.

Records Held
World Record: Javelin Throw - 69.32 m (September 11, 1977 - )

Championships
1972 Olympics: Javelin Throw (3rd)
1976 Olympics: Javelin Throw (3rd)
1969 USA Outdoors: Javelin Throw (1st)

Education
junior college: Long Beach Community College
undergraduate: UCLA (Los Angeles, California)
undergraduate: Long Beach State (Long Beach, California)

Jackson Scholz

Photo of Jackson Scholz

Inducted: 1977, athlete

Born: March 15, 1897 - Buchanan, Michigan
Deceased: October 26, 1986

Events
100 yd. - 9.50


In the movie "Chariots of Fire," Jackson Scholz gained fame in recent times as the runner who finished second to Britain's Harold Abrahams in the 100 meters at the 1924 Olympic Games. In fact, Scholz was the first man to reach a sprint final in three different Olympics. In 1920, he was fourth in the 100 meters and won a gold medal in the 4x100m relay. Four years later, he won the gold medal at 200 meters and the silver medal in finishing second to Abrahams in the 100 meters. In 1928, he was fourth in the 200 meters. A star while at the University of Missouri, Scholz won his only national title in 1925 in the AAU 220. A competitor for the Newark A.C. in his postcollege days, Scholz later became a successful freelance writer.

Championships
1920 Olympics: 100 m (4th)
1920 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1924 Olympics: 100 m (2nd)
1924 Olympics: 200 m (1st)
1928 Olympics: 200 m (4th)
1925 AAU: 220 yd. (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Missouri (Columbia, Missouri)

Occupations
Freelance writer

Bob Schul

Photo of Bob Schul

Inducted: 1991, athlete

Born: September 28, 1937 - West Milton, Ohio

Events
2 mi. - 8:26
3 mi. - 13:10
5,000 m - 13:38.00


A late bloomer as an international distance runner, Bob Schul earned the signal distinction of being the only American ever to win the Olympic 5000 meters when he sprinted home in the rain at the 1964 Tokyo Olympics. His triumph came just a few days after fellow Hall of Famer Billy Mills unexpectedly became the first American ever to win the Olympic 1,000 meters. As a youth, Schul's running potential was impeded by an asthmatic condition. A 4:34 high school miler, he joined the track team at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, as a walk-on. After interrupting his studies while he served in the Air Force, Schul ratcheted up his running under the tutelage of coach Mihaly Igloi. By 1963, when he returned to college, he had his first international success, winning a bronze medal in the 5000 meters at the Pan American Games. The following year, he ran 13:38.0 to break the American 5000m record by seven seconds, set a world record of 8:26.4 in the two-mile run, finished first in the USA-USSR dual meet, and won both the U.S. 5000m title and the Olympic trials. After brashly predicting an Olympic triumph, Schul made good on his promise, running the final lap in a withering 54.8 seconds. A year after the Games, Schul won the national three-mile title in an American record of 13:10.4.

Records Held
World Record: 2 mi. - 8:26
American Record: 3 mi. - 13:10
American Record: 5,000 m - 13:38.00 (June 5, 1964 - )

Championships
1964 Olympics: 5,000 m (1st)
1964 USA Outdoors: 5,000 m (1st)
1965 USA Outdoors: 3 mi. (1st)
1963 Pan-Am Games: 5,000 m (3rd)

Education
high school: Milton Union (Dayton, Ohio), 1955
undergraduate: Miami of Ohio (Oxford, Ohio), 1966

Occupations
Coach

Steve Scott

Photo of Steve Scott

Inducted: 2002, athlete

Born: May 5, 1956 - Upland, California

Events
1,500 m - 3:31.76
1 mi. - 3:47.69
2,000 m - 4:54.71
3,000 m - 7:36.69
5,000 m - 13:30.39


The model of consistently as a middle-distance runner, Steve Scott ran 136 sub-4-minute miles in his career, more than any other athlete in the world. While at the University of California at Irvine, Scott broke 4 minutes for the first time in the mile and achieved the first of his eight consecutive rankings as the top miler in the U.S. Overall, Track & Field News ranked Scott #1 in the U.S. on 10 occasions and 11 times placed him in the top-10 milers worldwide. The NCAA 1500m champion as a senior at California-Irvine, Scott also won the U.S. men's 1500m title six times and the U.S. indoor mile crown four times. He won the 1980 Olympic Trials, but the U.S. boycott of the Games kept Scott from competing in Moscow. He competed in the 1984 and 1988 Olympics, finishing 10th and fifth, respectively. Scott was the silver medalist in the 1500 meters at the inaugural IAAF World Championships in 1983. He set three U.S. records, running the outdoor mile in 3:47.69 in 1982; and the still-standing records in the indoor mile in 3:51.8 in 1981 and the indoor 2000 meters in 4:58.6, also in 1981.

Records Held
American Record: 1 mi. - 3:51.80
American Record: 1 mi. - 3:47.69 (July 7, 1982 - July 7, 2007)
American Record: 2,000 m - 4:58.60

Championships
1984 Olympics: 1,500 m (10th)
1988 Olympics: 1,500 m (5th)
1983 World Outdoors: 1,500 m (2nd)

Education
high school: Upland (Upland, California), 1974
undergraduate: California Irvine (Irvine, California), 1978

Occupations
Coach

Bob Seagren

Inducted: 1986, athlete

Born: October 17, 1946 - Pomona, California

Events
Pole Vault - 5.63 m


A four-time outdoor world record-holder in the pole vault, Bob Seagren improved that standard by more than a foot between 1966 and 1972, culminating in a mark of 18' 5 3/4". While at the University of Southern California, Seagren won four NCAA titles, indoors and outdoors. He also won six National AAU titles and was the Pan American Games champion in 1967. After winning the 1968 Olympic Trials, he was told he would have to compete at a "final" trial two weeks later. In the interim, he injured a disc in a spine, but succeeded in setting a world record of 17' 9" at the second trials. He went on to win the gold medal at the 1968 Olympic in a 7 1/2-hour competition. Four years later, in Munich, he was favored to win again, only to have his new Cata-Pole barred from competition in a last-minute ruling. Vaulting with an unfamiliar pole, he finished second to East German Wolfgang Nordwig who benefited because he didn't normally use a Cata-Pole. Seagren later joined the professional track circuit before becoming an actor and an executive for Puma.

Records Held
World Record: Pole Vault - 5.63 m (July 2, 1972 - )

Championships
1968 Olympics: Pole Vault (1st)
1972 Olympics: Pole Vault (2nd)
1967 Pan-Am Games: Pole Vault (1st)

Education
high school: Pomona (Pomona, California)
junior college: Mt. San Antonio College
undergraduate: USC (Los Angeles, California), 1968

Occupations
Actor
Sporting goods executive

Maren Seidler

Photo of Maren Seidler

Inducted: 2000, athlete

Born: June 11, 1951 - Brooklyn, New York

Events
Shot Put - 19.09 m


For a period of 13 years, Maren Seidler totally dominated shot putting in the U.S. She won 23 national titles from 1967 to 1980, including a record-setting nine consecutive outdoor titles. Seidler was a member of four Olympic teams (1968, 1972, 1976 and 1980). She was also a member of three Pan American teams (1967, 1975 and 1979) and placed second in 1979. In all, she competed on 20 international teams. A graduate of Tufts University, Seidler was the first American woman to throw the shot more than 60 feet. In all, she broke the American shot put record 16 times, indoors and outdoors, and raised the outdoor record from 54' 9" to 62' 7 3/4". She was ranked first in the U.S. 11 times.

Records Held
American Record: Shot Put - 19.09 m (June 15, 1979 - )

Championships
1968 Olympics: Shot Put (11th)
1976 Olympics: Shot Put (12th)

Education
undergraduate: Tufts (Medford, Massachusetts), 1973

Mel (Peerless Mel) Sheppard

Photo of Mel (Peerless Mel) Sheppard

Inducted: 1976, athlete

Born: September 5, 1883 - Almonesson Lake, New Jersey
Deceased: January 4, 1942

Events
800 m - 1:52.00
1,500 m - 4:03.40


The first man to win Olympic gold medals in both the 800 and 1500, Mel Sheppard made his fame prior to World War I while representing the Irish-American A.C. Noted for being a frontrunner, "Peerless Mel," as he was nicknamed, won seven National AAU titles in the middle distances, including five outdoors, and set world records of 1:52.8 and 4:03.4 while winning the 800 and 1500 at the 1908 Olympic Games. He earned another gold medal in 1908 as the anchorman on the winning U.S. medley relay team. In 1912, he won a gold medal as lead-off runner on the 4x400m relay team that set a world record of 3:16.6. In three other appearances at the 1912 Olympics, he was second in the 800, sixth in the 1500 and a non-qualifier in the 400. In addition to his world records at 800m and 1500m, Sheppard set indoor world records for the 600- and 1000-yard runs and was a member of several relay teams that held world records. For many years, he was the recreation director of the Millrose A.A. He was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1989.

Records Held
World Record: 1,500 m - 4:03.40 (July 14, 1908 - )

Championships
1908 Olympics: 800 m (1st)
1908 Olympics: 1,500 m (1st)
1908 Olympics: 4,000 m relay (1st)
1912 Olympics: 800 m (2nd)
1912 Olympics: 1,500 m (6th)
1912 Olympics: 1,600 m relay - 3:16.60 (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Brown Preparatory (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 1905

Occupations
Clerk
Recreational director

Martin Sheridan

Photo of Martin Sheridan

Inducted: 1988, athlete

Born: March 28, 1881 - County Mayo, IE
Deceased: March 27, 1918

Events
Discus Throw - 43.70 m


After emigrating to the U.S. from his native Ireland in 1897, Martin Sheridan went on to become one of the top U.S. Olympic medal winners in history. His total of nine Olympic medals is surpassed only by immortals Ray Ewry, Paavo Nurmi and Carl Lewis. A member of the New York City police force, Sheridan's track career produced 11 national titles, including four in the discus and three in the all-around (the forerunner of the decathlon). In Olympic competition, Sheridan reaped his nine medals in 1904, 1906 and 1908 Games in such diverse events as the discus, shot put, standing high jump, standing long jump and stone throw. He also set five world records in the discus and his 1905 mark of 143' 4" lasted for seven years. He might have thrown farther that day had he not had to withdraw because of an injury suffered the previous day in the pole vault. Sheridan died of pneumonia at the age of 36.

Records Held
World Record: Discus Throw - 43.68 m

Championships
1904 Olympics: Discus Throw (1st)
1906 Olympics: Discus Throw (1st)
1906 Olympics: Shot Put (1st)
1906 Olympics: Standing High Jump (2nd)
1906 Olympics: Standing Long Jump (2nd)
1906 Olympics: Stone-Throw (2nd)
1908 Olympics: Discus Throw (1st)

Occupations
Policeman

Jean Shiley

Inducted: 1993, athlete

Born: November 20, 1911 - Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Events
High Jump - 1.67 m


As a member of the Haverford Township (Pa.) High School basketball team, Jean Shiley's leaping ability drew the attention of a local reporter, who suggested that she try out for the 1928 Olympic team as a high jumper. Just 16, she made the team, finished 4th at the Amsterdam Games, then began dominating U.S. women's high jumping. Shiley won the national title three years in succession from 1929 to 1931 before tying Babe Didriksen for the title in 1932. The two women then staged one of the greatest one-on-one duels in Olympic history at the Los Angeles Games. They matched each other jump for jump and each cleared 5' 5" to set a world record. In the jump-off for first place, both cleared 5' 5 3/4" but Didriksen's "diving roll" style was ruled inadmissible and Shiney was awarded the gold medal. That world record was to stand for seven years and it remained the American record until 1948. Shiley also set the American indoor record of 5' 3 1/4", which remained unbroken for 38 years. A 1933 graduate of Temple University, Shiley was the captain of the 1932 Olympic women's track and field team.

Records Held
World Record: High Jump - 1.67 m (August 7, 1932 - )

Championships
1928 Olympics: High Jump (4th)
1932 Olympics: High Jump - 1.67 m (1st)
1929 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1930 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1931 AAU: High Jump (1st)
1932 AAU: High Jump (1st)

Education
high school: Haverford High School (Haverford Township, Pennsylvania), 1929
undergraduate: Temple (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 1933

Frank Shorter

Photo of Frank Shorter

Inducted: 1989, athlete

Born: October 31, 1947 - Munich, DE

Events
3 mi. - 12:52
5,000 m - 13:26.60
10,000 m - 27:45.91
marathon - 2:10:30


Frank Shorter was a driving force in the distance running boom that started in the U.S. in the late 1970s. He captured the imagination of runners throughout the country and worldwide when he won the 1972 Olympic marathon, finishing more than two minutes ahead of his closest competitor. A Yale University graduate, Shorter won his first major championship when he took the NCAA six-mile title in 1969. The following year, he won the 10,000 meters in the USA-USSR dual meet. In 1971, he won both the 10,000 and the marathon at the Pan American Games and followed up by taking the first of four successive victories in Japan's prestigious Fukuoka Marathon. His crowning moment came in 1972 in Munich, the city of his birth. There, he finished fifth in the 10,000 meters before his victory in the marathon. A 24-time national champion, Shorter's 1972 Olympic win earned him the Sullivan Award as the nation's top amateur athlete. In 1976, he took the silver medal in the Olympic marathon. Shorter earned a law degree in 1974 and later started his own athletic supply company. He also works in television as a sports commentator. Shorter was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1984.

Championships
1972 Olympics: 10,000 m (5th)
1972 Olympics: marathon (1st)
1976 Olympics: marathon (2nd)
1971 Pan-Am Games: 10,000 m (1st)
1971 Pan-Am Games: marathon (1st)
1969 NCAA: 6 mi. (1st)

Education
high school: Mount Hernon Academy (Northfield, Massachusetts), 1965
undergraduate: Yale (New Haven, Connecticut), 1969

Occupations
Businessman
Television sports commentator
Drug enforcement administrator

Jay Silvester

Inducted: 1998, athlete

Born: August 27, 1937 - Trementon, Utah

Events
Discus Throw - 68.40 m


Jay Silvester set his first of four world records in the discus in 1961 when he threw 198' 8". He later became the first in his event to exceed 220' when he threw 224' 5" in 1968. He even became the first discus thrower to break 230'. However, his 1971 effort of 230' 11" was never ratified because it occurred in informal conditions and was aided by strong winds. Winner of five national titles, Silvester won the Olympic Trials in 1964, 1968 and 1972. He was also a member of the 1976 Olympic team. Despite his pre-Olympic dominance, he won only one medal -- a silver in 1972. He took fourth at the 1964 Games, fifth in 1968, and eighth in 1976. Three of those four times he lost to fellow Americans and Hall of Famers -- Al Oerter (1964 and 1968) and Mac Wilkins (1976). A member of 18 U.S. national teams, Silvester was also an excellent shot putter, recording a best of 65' 7 3/4" in 1971. After graduating from Utah State, Silvester earned his Ph.D. from Brigham Young University and was a highly successful coach there.

Records Held
World Record: Discus Throw - 68.40 m (September 18, 1968 - )

Championships
1964 Olympics: Discus Throw (4th)
1968 Olympics: Discus Throw (5th)
1972 Olympics: Discus Throw (2nd)
1976 Olympics: Discus Throw (8th)

Education
undergraduate: Utah State (Logan, Utah), 1959

Occupations
Coach
Academic

Dave Sime

Inducted: 1981, athlete

Born: July 25, 1936 - Paterson, New Jersey

Events
100 yd. - 9.30
220 yd. - 20.00


Dave Sime never won a major title but he ranked as one of the fastest humans of all time, holding several sprint records during the late 1950s. Sime, who was also an excellent baseball player, became a star in 1956 while attending Duke University. He and fellow American (and Hall of Famer) Bobby Morrow had some great duels that year but an injury in the NCAA championships ruined his Olympic hopes. Four years later, he was second in the Olympic 100 meters before anchoring the U.S. to an apparent victory in the 4x100m relay. However, the U.S. team was disqualified for passing out of the zone, costing Sime his last chance at an Olympic gold medal. During his career, he held world records at 100 yards, 220 yards, and the 220-yard low hurdles. After college, Sime became an ophthalmologist in Florida.

Records Held
American Record: 100 yd. - 9.50

Championships
1960 Olympics: 100 m (2nd)

Education
undergraduate: Duke (Durham, North Carolina), 1958

Occupations
Ophthalmologist

Robert Simpson

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: May 25, 1892 - Bosworth, Missouri
Deceased: October 10, 1975

Events
120 yd. hurdles - 14.60


Two of the world's best hurdlers during World War I were Robert Simpson of the U.S. and his brother-in-law Earl Thomson of Canada. In 1916, Simpson broke Thomson's word record in the 120-yard hurdles by two-tenths of a second when he ran 14.6. That mark stood for four years before Thomson reclaimed the record with a 14.4 in 1920. One of the University of Missouri's finest athletes, Simpson won the National AAU high hurdles title in 1916 while in school, then claimed another title in 1919 representing the Illinois A.C. At the Inter-Allied Games in 1919, Simpson recorded a double victory in the 110m hurdles and 200m hurdles. As Missouri's head track coach from 1920 to 1926, he tutored future Hall of Famers Brutus Hamilton and Jackson Scholz. Simpson later coached at Iowa State University.

Records Held
World Record: 120 yd. hurdles - 14.60

Championships
1916 AAU: 110 m hurdles (1st)
1919 AAU: 110 m hurdles (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Missouri (Columbia, Missouri)

Occupations
Coach

Tommie Smith

Photo of Tommie Smith

Inducted: 1978, athlete

Born: June 5, 1944 - Clarksville, Texas

Events
100 m - 10.10
200 m - 19.83
400 m - 44.50


At 6' 3" and 185 pounds, Tommie Smith had the ideal build for a long sprinter and his acceleration in the latter stages of a race made him virtually unbeatable at any of the sprint distances. With all-time bests of 10.1 for 100 meters, 19.83 for 200 meters and 44.5 for the 400, Smith still ranks high on the all-time list. A three-sport star while in high school (in basketball, football and track and field), Smith went on to San Jose State College, where he was coached by Hall of Famer Bud Winter. He quickly confounded all expectations, running an incredible 19.5 on a 220-yard straightaway and running the same distance on a turn in 20.0. In 1967, Smith won the 220 yard title at the NCAAs and AAU national championships. That same year, in a rare appearance in the 400 meters, Smith beat future Olympic champion Lee Evans by 0.5 seconds and broke the world record by 0.4 with a time of 44.5. In 1968, he again won the national collegiate 220 title before suffering a rare loss at the Olympic Trials when he finished second to John Carlos. At the Mexico City Olympics, Carlos led the 200 finals until Smith turned on his "Tommie-jets" and won in a world record of 19.83. After three seasons of pro football with the Cincinnati Bengals, Smith became athletic director at Oberlin College before switching to Santa Monica College as head cross country and track and field coach and sociology professor.

Records Held
World Record: 200 m - 19.83 (October 16, 1968 - )
World Record: 400 m - 44.50 (May 20, 1967 - )

Championships
1968 Olympics: 200 m - 19.83 (1st)
1967 AAU: 220 yd. (1st)
1967 NCAA: 220 yd. (1st)
1968 NCAA: 220 yd. (1st)

Education
undergraduate: San Jose State (San Jose, California), 1968

Occupations
Coach
Academician

Larry Snyder

Photo of Larry Snyder

Inducted: 1978, coach

Born: August 9, 1896 - Canton, Ohio
Deceased: September 25, 1982


The head track coach at Ohio State University from 1932 until 1965, Lawrence "Larry" Snyder coached some of the greatest track athletes in history, including Hall of Famers Jesse Owens, Dave Albritton, Glenn Davis and Mal Whitfield. Snyder was a pilot instructor in World War I and did some stunt flying in the early 1920s before enrolling at Ohio State. After an outstanding track career, he later wound up at track coach at OSU. During his coaching career, his athletes set 14 world records, won 52 All-Americans certificates and eight Olympic gold medals. An assistant coach of the 1952 Olympic team, Snyder was head coach of the 1960 team. He retired from coaching five years later.

Education
undergraduate: Ohio State (Columbus, Ohio)

Occupations
Coach

Andy Stanfield

Photo of Andy Stanfield

Inducted: 1977, athlete

Born: December 29, 1927 - Washington D.C.,
Deceased: June 15, 1985

Events
200 m - 20.60


Forced to concentrate on the 200 meters because of chronic leg problems in the shorter sprints, Andy Stanfield became one of the best furlong sprinters of all time, winning gold and silver medals in the event at two successive Olympics. A New Jersey high school state champion in the 220-yard dash and long jump, Stanfield excelled in the 200m, long jump and low hurdles at Seton Hall University. During his career at Seton Hall, Stanfield won eight of a possible nine IC4A sprint titles indoors and outdoors from 1949 through 1951. He also won five AAU titles in four different events (the 60-yard, 100m and 200m dashes and the long jump). At the 1952 Helsinki Olympics, he won the 200 meters and ran on the winning 4x100m relay. He again made the Olympic team in 1956 and finished second in the 200 to fellow Hall of Famer Bobby Morrow. Stanfield set a world record of 20.6 in the 200 meters, which he later tied twice, and was on the U.S. team that set a world record in the 4x220-yard relay. Overall, he won four National AAU titles, including three in the 200-220. After college, Stanfield competed for the New York Pioneer Club, where he was coached by Hall of Famer Joe Yancey.

Records Held
World Record: 200 m - 20.60 (June 28, 1952 - )

Championships
1952 Olympics: 200 m (1st)
1952 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1956 Olympics: 200 m (2nd)

Education
high school: Lincoln (Jersey City, New Jersey), 1946
undergraduate: Seton Hall (South Orange, New Jersey), 1952

Les Steers

Photo of Les Steers

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: June 16, 1917 - Eureka, California
Deceased: January 23, 2003

Events
High Jump - 2.11 m


Lester "Les" Steers could have been the world's first 7-foot high jumper if World War II had not curtailed his jumping. While at the University of Oregon, Steers set two world records in 1941, first clearing 6' 10 3/4", then raising the standard to 6' 11". The latter mark would remain the record for a dozen years. A straddle jumper, Steers was an outstanding talent at Palo Alto (Calif.) High School. He later became the 1941 national collegiate champion and won or tied for three National AAU titles. In 1941, he also jumped over 7' in an unsanctioned exhibition meet. No one would achieve this height officially until 1956. Steers later became a salesman in Portland, Oregon.

Records Held
World Record: High Jump - 2.11 m (June 17, 1941 - )

Championships
1941 NCAA: High Jump (1st)

Education
high school: Palo Alto (Palo Alto, California)
junior college: San Mateo (San Mateo, California)
undergraduate: Oregon (Eugene, Oregon)

Occupations
Salesman

Helen Stephens

Inducted: 1975, athlete

Born: February 3, 1918 - Fulton, Missouri
Deceased: January 17, 1994

Events
50 m - 6.40
100 m - 11.70


A multi-talented athlete, Helen Stephens was an Olympic sprint champion who also competed very successfully in the weight events, a unique combination even by today's standards. While a student at Woods College in Missouri, Stephens became famous overnight when she beat reigning Olympic champion Stella Walsh in the 1935 national championships. The following year, she defended her national 100m title and also won the shot and discus championships at the same meet. At the Berlin Olympics, she was one of the top women competitors, winning gold medals in the 100 and 4x100m relay and displaying her versatility by placing ninth in the discus. In all, she won a dozen National AAU titles, seven of them indoors. Never defeated in the sprints, she later played semi-professional basketball, worked in the U.S. civil service and competed in Masters events in the early 1980s.

Records Held
World Record: 50 m - 6.40 (February 12, 1936 - )

Championships
1936 Olympics: Discus Throw (9th)
1936 Olympics: 100 m (1st)
1936 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1935 AAU: 100 m (1st)
1936 AAU: Shot Put (1st)
1936 AAU: Discus Throw (1st)
1936 AAU: 100 m (1st)

Education
high school: Fulton (Fulton, Missouri), 1935
undergraduate: William Woods (Fulton, Missouri)

Occupations
U.S. Civil Service

Dwight Stones

Photo of Dwight Stones

Inducted: 1998, athlete

Born: December 6, 1953 - Los Angeles, California

Events
High Jump - 2.34 m


Twice named the World Indoor Athlete of the Year by Track & Field News, Dwight Stones was one of the world's top high jumpers from 1972 to 1984. He was just 18 when he represented the U.S. for the first time at the 1972 Olympic Games, placing third in the high jump competition. Four years later, he was again third. He returned to the Olympics in 1984, finishing fourth after setting his 13th American record at that year's Trials. A three-time world record holder in the high jump, Stones set his first world record when he cleared 7' 6 1/2" in 1973 at Munich, Germany. That jump also made him the first "flop" jumper to set a world high jump record, five years after Dick Fosbury made that jumping style famous while winning the Mexico City Olympics. Stones raised the world record to 7' 7" in 1976 and added another quarter inch to the record two months later. During his 16-year career, he won an incredible 19 national championships and remains history's all-time #1 ranked high jumper. In 1984, Stones became the first athlete to both compete and announce at the same Olympics. Since then, he has been a color analyst for all three major networks and continues to cover track and field consistently on television.

Records Held
World Record (indoor): High Jump - 2.29 m
World Record (indoor): High Jump - 2.30 m
World Record (indoor): High Jump - 2.26 m
World Record (indoor): High Jump - 2.27 m
World Record (indoor): High Jump - 2.28 m
World Record: High Jump - 2.30 m (July 11, 1973 - )
World Record: High Jump - 2.31 m (June 5, 1976 - )
World Record: High Jump - 2.32 m (August 4, 1976 - )
American Record: High Jump - 2.31 m
American Record: High Jump - 2.34 m

Championships
1972 Olympic Games: High Jump - 2.21 m (3rd)
1976 Olympic Games: High Jump (3rd)
1984 Olympic Games: High Jump (4th)
1977 World Cup: High Jump (2nd)
1983 World Outdoor Championships: High Jump (6th)
1971 AAU Outdoor Championships: High Jump (10th)
1972 U.S. Olympic Trials: High Jump - 2.21 m (1st)
1973 AAU Indoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1973 AAU Outdoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1973 USTFF Indoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1973 USTFF Outdoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1974 AAU Outdoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1974 USTFF Indoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1975 AAU Indoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1975 AAU Outdoor Championships: High Jump (3rd)
1975 USTFF Indoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1975 USTFF Outdoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1976 AAU Outdoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1976 U.S. Olympic Trials: High Jump (2nd)
1976 USTFF Outdoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1977 AAU Indoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1977 AAU Outdoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1977 USTFF Outdoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1978 AAU Outdoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1980 AAU Outdoor Championships: High Jump (3rd)
1980 U.S. Olympic Trials: High Jump (10th)
1981 AAU Outdoor Championships: High Jump (9th)
1982 TAC Indoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1982 TAC Outdoor Championships: High Jump (4th)
1983 TAC Indoor Championships: High Jump (3rd)
1983 TAC Outdoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1984 U.S. Olympic Trials: High Jump - 2.34 m (1st)
1972 NCAA Outdoor Championships: High Jump (3rd)
1976 NCAA Indoor Championships: High Jump (1st)
1976 NCAA Outdoor Championships: High Jump - 2.31 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: UCLA (Los Angeles, California)
undergraduate: Long Beach State (Long Beach, California), 1976

Occupations
Television commentator

James Sullivan

Inducted: 1977, administrator

Born: November 18, 1860 - New York, New York
Deceased: September 16, 1914


A book publisher and sport editor of various newspapers, James Sullivan was one of the founders of the Amateur Athletic Union in 1888. He was the AAU's secretary from 1889 to 1896 and was its president from 1906 to 1909. As secretary-treasurer from 1909 until his death, he helped make the AAU a powerful organization with control over many sports. He also organized the public schools athletic league in New York City and served in a number of capacities for what it now known as the U.S. Olympic Committee. The Sullivan Award that goes annually to the nation's top amateur athlete is named in his honor.

Occupations
Track & field administrator

Frederick Morgan Taylor

Photo of Frederick Morgan Taylor

Inducted: 2000, athlete

Born: April 17, 1903 - Sioux City, Iowa
Deceased: February 16, 1975

Events
400 m hurdles - 52.00


One of the greatest 400m hurdlers in track and field history, Frederick Morgan Taylor won three Olympic medals in the event over a span of eight years. A national champion hurdler at Sioux City High School, he became an outstanding athlete at Grinnell College in Iowa, where he played football and ran track, winning the 1925 NCAA 220-yard low hurdles. It was in 1924 that Taylor achieved his greatest fame. At the Olympic Trials that year, he set an American record, then won the gold medal at the Paris Olympics. He set a world record of 52.6 at the Olympics but the time was not accepted since he knocked down a hurdle (a rule in force at the time). Taylor also competed in the 1928 and 1932 Olympics and won bronze medals both times. At the 1932 Olympics, he was honored as the U.S. flag bearer at the Opening Ceremonies. Although his career spanned a decade, he ran the 400m hurdles only a total of 30 times, winning four national AAU championships.

Records Held
World Record: 400 m hurdles - 52.00 (July 4, 1928 - )

Championships
1924 Olympics: 400 m hurdles - 52.60 (1st)
1928 Olympics: 400 m hurdles (3rd)
1932 Olympics: 400 m hurdles (3rd)
1925 NCAA: 220 yd. hurdles (1st)

Education
high school: Sioux City (Sioux City, Iowa)
undergraduate: Grinnell College (Grinnell, Iowa), 1925

Occupations
Businessman

Ed Temple

Photo of Ed Temple

Inducted: 1989, coach

Born: September 20, 1927 - Harrisburg, Pennsylvania


In his first two decades of coaching alone, Ed Temple compiled a coaching record that would be the envy of someone twice his age. As an undergraduate at Tennessee State University, he was an accomplished sprinter, running 9.7 in the 100-yard dash and 21.5 for 220 yards. After graduating from the college, he was pursuing his masters' degree in 1953 when he took a position as assistant women's track and field coach. That same year, he became head women's coach and gave the team the name "Tigerbelles." Under his tutelage, Tigerbelle athletes won 23 Olympic medals, 13 of them gold. His Olympic championship included Wilma Rudolph, Mae Faggs, Wyomia Tyus, Edith McGuire and Madeline Manning Mims, all Hall of Famers. His Tigerbelle teams were perennial national champions, capturing a total of 34 team titles, 16 indoors, 13 outdoors and five in junior competition. Temple was honored as the head coach of the U.S. Olympic women's team in both 1960 and 1964 and was an assistant coach in 1980. He was also head women's coach for the 1958 and 1959 dual meets between the USA and the USSR, and was also head women's coach at the 1959 and 1975 Pan-American Games. Since retiring from Tennesee State in 1993, Temple remained active in the city of Nashville. He is the author of Run Fast, Jump High and Only the Pure in Heart Survive.

Education
undergraduate: Tennessee State (Nashville, Tennessee), 1950

Occupations
Coach

Robert Lyman (Dink) Templeton

Photo of Robert Lyman (Dink) Templeton

Inducted: 1976, coach

Born: May 27, 1897 - Helena, Montana
Deceased: August 7, 1962


Robert Lyman "Dink" Templeton was a multi-talented athlete at Stanford University who competed in the 1920 Olympics in two sports – track and field and rugby. He was fourth in the long jump at Antwerp but won a gold medal with the rugby team. At that year's Olympic Trials, Templeton lost the chance to qualify in his best event, the high jump, when his style of jumping called the "Western roll," was considered an illegal dive. Four years later, he again represented the U.S. in the Olympic long-jump competition. Templeton went on to become an excellent coach and some of his innovations are still in effect today. He became Stanford coach in 1922 and during his 17-year tenure, the Indians (as they were known then) won three national collegiate team titles and 19 NCAA individual titles. He held intensive daily track practices, not common in those days, and his ability to get the maximum out of his athletes became a trademark. He later coached the famed San Francisco Olympic Club and remained active in coaching until his death. A graduate of Stanford Law School, Templeton also was a broadcaster and journalist.

Championships
1920 Olympics: Long Jump (4th)

Education
high school: Palo Alto (Palo Alto, California)
undergraduate: Stanford (Palo Alto, California), 1921

Occupations
Coach
Journalist
Broadcaster

Walter Tewskbury

Inducted: 1996, athlete

Born: March 21, 1876 - Ashley, Pennsylvania
Deceased: April 25, 1968

Events
60 m - 7.10
100 m - 10.80
400 m hurdles - 57.60


One of the world's top sprinters-hurdlers at the turn of the century, Dr. John Walter Tewksbury was a star of the 1900 Olympic Games, winning five medals. He was the gold medalist at 200 meters and the 400m hurdles, the silver medalist at 60 meters and 100 meters and the bronze medalist in the 200m low hurdles. His time of 57.6 seconds in the 400m hurdles at the 1900 Olympics was the fastest by an American although the event wasn't recognized for record purposes at that time. At the time, the event was a European specialty, and 30-foot telephone poles were used as barriers when it was introduced to the Olympics in 1900. While a student at the University of Pennsylvania, Tewksbury won both sprints at the IC4As meets in 1898 and 1899. He subsequently tied the world 100m record of 10.8. After earning his dental degree from Penn, he practiced dentistry in his hometown of Tunkhannock, Pa. Before he died in 1968, he was the last-known survivor of the 1900 Olympic team.

Records Held
World Record: 100 m - 10.80

Championships
1900 Olympics: 60 m (2nd)
1900 Olympics: 100 m (2nd)
1900 Olympics: 200 m (1st)
1900 Olympics: 200 m hurdles (3rd)
1900 Olympics: 400 m hurdles - 57.60 (1st)
1898 IC4A: 100 m (1st)
1898 IC4A: 200 m (1st)
1899 IC4A: 100 m (1st)
1899 IC4A: 200 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 1899

Occupations
Dentist

John Thomas

Photo of John Thomas

Inducted: 1985, athlete

Born: March 3, 1941 - Boston, Massachusetts

Events
High Jump - 2.22 m


While still a 17-year-old freshman at Boston University, high jumper John Thomas stunned the track world when he became the first athlete to clear 7' indoors. His world indoor best of 7' 1 1/4" in 1959 launched him on a high jump career that spanned two Olympics and nine national titles. During his career, Thomas broke the outdoor world record three times, all in 1960, culminating with a clearance of 7' 3 1/2", which broke his previous best jump by 1 1/2". He was upset at the 1960 Olympic Games but still took the bronze medal. Four years later, in Tokyo, he cleared the same height as his rival Valery Brumel of the USSR, but was relegated to second place because Brumel had fewer misses. Between 1959 and 1966, Thomas won two national collegiate titles and seven National AAU titles, two outdoors and five outdoors. Over his career, Thomas cleared 7' or higher a colossal 191 times, losing only eight competitions. Also a good high hurdler, Thomas later became a track coach before entering business.

Records Held
World Record: High Jump - 2.21 m (July 1, 1960 - )

Championships
1960 Olympics: High Jump (3rd)
1964 Olympics: High Jump (2nd)

Education
undergraduate: Boston (Boston, Massachusetts), 1963

Occupations
Coach
Businessman

Earl Thomson

Photo of Earl Thomson

Inducted: 1977, athlete

Born: February 15, 1895 - Prince Albert, CA
Deceased: April 19, 1971

Events
120 yd. hurdles - 14.40
110 m hurdles - 14.80


Although a Canadian citizen, Earl Thomson achieved his greatest fame in the U.S., both as an athlete and coach. Thomson, who competed for Dartmouth College and the University of Southern California, was the first athlete to break 15 seconds for the high hurdles, setting a world record of 14.8 in 1916. He lost the world record to his brother-in-law, Robert Simpson (also a Hall of Famer), later that year. In 1920, Thomson regained it with a time of 14.4, a record that lasted for 11 years. He won the gold medal in the 110m hurdles while representing Canada in the 1920 Olympic Games. Thomson, who was almost totally deaf, won the national collegiate title in 1921 and took three National AAU titles. He became a coach at the University of West Virginia and later at Yale University. From there, he went on to coach at the U.S. Naval Academy, where his team won the 1945 national collegiate title.

Records Held
World Record: 120 yd. hurdles - 14.40
World Record: 110 m hurdles - 14.80 (August 18, 1920 - )

Championships
1920 Olympics: 110 m hurdles - 14.80 (1st)
1921 NCAA: 110 m hurdles (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Dartmouth (Hanover, New Hampshire)
undergraduate: USC (Los Angeles, California), 1917

Occupations
Coach

Jim Thorpe

Photo of Jim Thorpe

Inducted: 1975, athlete

Born: May 28, 1888 - Shawnee, Oklahoma
Deceased: February 28, 1953

Events
Decathlon - 6756 pts.


Recognized as perhaps the great athlete of all time, James "Jim" Thorpe excelled in every sport he attempted. A Sac-Fox Native American, Thorpe was a two-time All-American in football and starred in baseball, basketball and track at Carlisle Indian School. His track exploits won him a place on the 1912 Olympic team in two individual events (the high jump and long jump) and two multi-events (the pentathlon and decathlon). Thorpe took his challenge in stride, even though he had never competed in a decathlon and only begun throwing a javelin (one of the 10 events) two months earlier. In Stockholm, he won both multi-events, setting a world record in the decathlon, and taking fourth in the high jump and seventh in the long jump. However, he was stripped of his medals when it was revealed that he had played semi-pro baseball in 1911. It wasn't until 1983 -- 30 years after his death -- that Thorpe's medals were reinstated. Thorpe later played professional football and was one of the first stars of the National Football League, earning him a place in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He also played major league baseball with several teams. He was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1983.

Championships
1912 Olympics: Decathlon (1st)
1912 Olympics: Pentathlon (1st)
1912 Olympics: High Jump (4th)
1912 Olympics: Long Jump (7th)

Education
high school: Haskell (Haskell, Oklahoma)
undergraduate: Carlisle Indian (Carlisle, Pennsylvania), 1913

Occupations
Professional football player
Professional baseball player

Eddie Tolan

Photo of Eddie Tolan

Inducted: 1982, athlete

Born: September 29, 1908 - Denver, Colorado
Deceased: January 30, 1967

Events
100 yd. - 9.50
100 m - 10.30


Only 5' 7" and 145 pounds, Eddie Tolan was a compact, confident sprinter who ruled the 100 and 200 meters from 1929 to 1932. The highlight of his career was the Los Angeles Olympics, in which he won the 100 by the narrowest of margins over fellow Hall of Famer Ralph Metcalfe in a world record-tying 10.3, then won the 200 easily in an Olympic record 21.2. Tolan's running career got off to an auspicious start at Detroit's Cass Tech High School, where he won his first sprint double at the state meet as a sophomore, before doubling at the National Interscholastic Championships in his senior year. After entering the University of Michigan, he made headlines in 1929 when he set a world record of 9.5 in the 100-yard dash. He went on to win the 1931 national collegiate 220 yard title as well as four National AAU sprint titles. At the 1932 Olympic Trials, he finished second in both the 100 and 200 to Metcalfe. But at the Olympics, he regained his winning form, taking both the sprint events. Over his career, Tolan won 300 races and lost just seven.

Records Held
World Record: 100 yd. - 9.50 (May 25, 1929 - )
World Record: 100 m - 10.30 (August 1, 1932 - )
Olympic Record: 200 m - 21.20

Championships
1932 Olympics: 100 m - 10.30 (1st)
1932 Olympics: 200 m - 21.20 (1st)
1931 NCAA: 220 yd. (1st)

Education
high school: Cass Tech (Detroit, Michigan), 1927
undergraduate: Michigan (Ann Arbor, Michigan), 1931

Occupations
Vaudevillian
School teacher

Bill Toomey

Photo of Bill Toomey

Inducted: 1975, athlete

Born: January 10, 1939 - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Events
Decathlon - 8309 pts.


A good all-around athlete at the University of Colorado, William "Bill" Toomey came to the decathlon in his mid 20s after winning five National AAU pentathlon titles. Building on his natural strengths as a long jumper and 400m runner, he worked hard on the field events and after two years as a decathlete, he set a world record in 1966. He subsequently won virtually every decathlon title, including five National AAU championships, the 1967 Pan-American Games and the 1968 British AAA title. His greatest achievement was his 1968 victory at Mexico City, where he became the ninth American to win the Olympic decathlon since Jim Thorpe's victory in 1912. A year later, Toomey regained his world record, recording a total of 8309 points. Following his retirement, he served as a member of the President's Commission on Olympic Sports from 1976 to 1978, was a consultant to the Los Angeles Organizing Committee, and has become a broadcast personality and motivational speaker.

Championships
1968 Olympics: Decathlon (1st)
1967 Pan-Am Games: Decathlon (1st)

Education
high school: Worcester Academy (Worcester, Massachusetts)
undergraduate: Colorado (Boulder, Colorado), 1962

Occupations
Businessman
Motivational speaker

Gwen Torrence

Photo of Gwen Torrence

Inducted: 2002, athlete

Born: June 12, 1965 - Decatur, Georgia

Events
100 m - 10.82
200 m - 21.72
400 m - 49.64


One of America's best and most versatile women sprinters of all time, Gwen Torrence won five medals at two Olympics and earned top U.S. ranking in the 100, 200 and 400 meters. A three-time state champion at Columbia High School, Torrence moved on to the University of Georgia in 1983. There, she became a 12-time All-American and four-time NCAA champion. She won gold medals at the 1987 Pan-American Games and World University Games. At the 1988 Olympics, she was finalist in both the 100 and 200 meters. Her greatest feats lay ahead. At the 1991 World Outdoor Championships, she was silver medalist in the 100m and 200m. A year later, at the Barcelona Olympics, she won gold medals in the 200 meters and 4x100m relay and a silver medal in the 4x400m relay. She won gold medals in the 4x400m relay at the 1993 World Outdoor Championships and in the 100m at the 1995 World Outdoors. At the 1996 Atlanta Olympics, she won a gold medal in the 4x100m relay and a bronze in the 100 meters. Torrence was also the U.S. indoor 60m champion five times and 200m champ twice. Track and Field News ranked her #1 in the world at 200 in 1994 and 1995. On four occasions, she was ranked #1 in the U.S. at 100m (1991-92-94-95) and she was ranked #1 in the world in the 200m in 1992, 1994 and 1995. Showing outstanding versatility, Torrence was ranked #1 nationally in 1991 in the 400 meters.

Championships
1988 Olympics: 100 m (5th)
1988 Olympics: 200 m (6th)
1992 Olympics: 100 m (4th)
1992 Olympics: 200 m (1st)
1992 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1992 Olympics: 1,600 m relay (2nd)
1996 Olympics: 100 m (3rd)
1996 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1991 World Outdoors: 100 m (2nd)
1991 World Outdoors: 200 m (2nd)
1993 World Outdoors: 1,600 m relay (1st)
1995 World Outdoors: 100 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Georgia (Athens, Georgia), 1987

Occupations
Hair Stylist

Forrest Towns

Photo of Forrest Towns

Inducted: 1976, athlete

Born: February 6, 1924 - Fitzgerald, Georgia
Deceased: April 4, 1991

Events
110 m hurdles - 13.70


Tall (6' 2") and blessed with 9.7 100-yard-dash speed, Forrest "Spec" Towns revolutionized the 110m high hurdles, dropping the world record an incredible four-tenths of a second to become the first person to break 14 seconds in that event. In high school, Towns played just one sport -- football. Nonetheless, he was awarded a track scholarship to the University of Georgia after astounding witnesses during a backyard high-jumping contest. In college, he was a quick learner under Hall of Fame coach Weems Baskin. Towns won the Southeastern AAU 120-yard hurdles in his freshman year and added the NCAA and National AAU titles the following year. In 1936, he set his first world record, running 14.1 in the 110m hurdles at the NCAA championships. He matched that time in winning the Berlin Olympics by a comfortable two yards. Three weeks later, he did the unthinkable, lowering the world record to 13.7 at a meet in Oslo, Norway. From 1935 to 1937, Towns won more than 60 consecutive hurdle races. He also set the world record of 7.3 seconds in the indoor 60-yard hurdles. Towns stayed on as a coach at Georgia and was the Bulldogs' head coach from 1946 to 1975.

Records Held
World Record: 110 m hurdles - 13.70 (August 27, 1936 - )

Championships
1936 Olympics: 110 m hurdles (1st)
1936 NCAA: 110 m hurdles - 14.10 (1st)

Education
high school: Richmond Academy (Augusta, Georgia), 1933
undergraduate: Georgia (Athens, Georgia), 1937

Wyomia Tyus

Photo of Wyomia Tyus

Inducted: 1980, athlete

Born: August 29, 1945 - Griffin, Georgia

Events
60 yd. - 6.50
100 m - 11.08


As a sprinter for Ed Temple's Tennessee State "Tigerbelles", Wyomia Tyus got early lessons in competing against the best. Tyus had to run regularly against Edith McGuire, whom she never beat in a race until the 100-meter finals at the 1964 Olympics, where Tyus won the gold medal after tying the world record of former Tigerbelle Wilma Rudolph in the semi-finals. Tyus and McGuire were both members of the 4x100m relay team that won a silver medal in Tokyo. Tyus capped this victory with another gold medal at the 1968 Olympics to become the first repeat winner in the 100 meters. Her time of 11.08 broke her own record, which she had set at the USA-USSR dual meet in 1965. At the Mexico City Olympics, she added a gold medal in the 4x100m relay and was sixth in the 200 meters. In between Olympic victories, she also won the 200 at the 1967 Pan-American Games. The holder of world records at both 100 yards and 100 meters, Tyus won eight National AAU titles, five of them outdoors. She was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1985.

Records Held
World Record: 60 yd. - 6.50 (March 4, 1966 - )
World Record: 100 m - 11.08 (October 15, 1968 - )

Championships
1964 Olympics: 100 m (1st)
1964 Olympics: 400 m relay (2nd)
1968 Olympics: 100 m - 11.08 (1st)
1968 Olympics: 200 m (6th)
1968 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1967 Pan-Am Games: 200 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Tennessee State (Nashville, Tennessee), 1967

Occupations
Telvision commentator
Academic

LeRoy Walker

Inducted: 1983, coach

Born: June 4, 1918 - Atlanta, Georgia


A past president of the U.S. Olympic Committee, Dr. LeRoy Walker served the sport of track and field as both coach and administrator. Holder of a doctoral degree from New York University, Walker was the chancellor at North Carolina Central University in Durham, where he had previously excelled as the university's track coach. As an undergraduate at Benedict College, Walker starred in football, basketball and track. He subsequently earned his Master's degree from Columbia University before turning to coaching. After taking over as NCC track coach in 1945, Walker developed a number of outstanding athletes, including hurdler Lee Calhoun, an Olympic champion and Hall of Famer. Walker also served as a coach or consultant for several foreign Olympic teams from 1960 through 1972. In 1976, he was the U.S. men's head coach, the first African-American man to serve in that position. Walker was chairman of the AAU men's track and field committee from 1973 to 1976 and the coordinator of coaching assignments for the AAU and TAC from 1973 to 1980. He became TAC president from 1984 to 1988. He later served as senior vice president for sport of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games. He brought many top track and field meets to Durham and was a key figure in the organizing of the Olympic Festival when it was held in North Carolina. He also is the author of three major books on physical education and track and field. Walker was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1987.

Education
undergraduate: Benedict College (Columbia, South Carolina), 1940

Occupations
Coach
Athletic administrator

Stella Walsh

Inducted: 1975, athlete

Born: April 3, 1911 - Wierzchowina, PL
Deceased: December 4, 1980

Events
60 m - 7.30
100 m - 11.60
200 m - 23.60
220 yd. - 24.30


Although a U.S. resident, Stella Walsh competed for Poland in the 1932 and 1936 Olympic games, winning the 100 meters in 1932 and taking second to Hall of Famer Helen Stephens in that event in 1936. Born Stanislawa Walasiewiczowna, she had a long track career, winning her first AAU title in 1930 and the last one 24 years later. She set 20 world records and won 41 AAU titles in events from the sprints to the long jump and discus throw. Of her 41 AAU championships, 27 of them came outdoors, including 11 each in the 220-yard dash and long jump. She also won 16 national titles in Poland. Her international successes included victories in the 60m, 100m and 200m at the 1930 Women's World Games and wins in the 100m and 200m at the 1938 European Championships. Walsh became a U.S. citizen in 1947. She married and lived in Cleveland until 1980 when she died from gunshot wounds. An autopsy revealed that Walsh had male sex organs.

Records Held
World Record: 60 m - 7.30
World Record: 100 m - 11.60 (August 1, 1937 - )
World Record: 200 m - 23.60 (August 4, 1935 - )
World Record: 220 yd. - 24.30

Championships
1932 Olympics: Discus Throw (6th)
1932 Olympics: 100 m (1st)
1936 Olympics: 100 m (2nd)
1938 European Championships: 100 m (1st)
1938 Europen Championships: 200 m (1st)

Cornelius (Dutch) Warmerdam

Photo of Cornelius (Dutch) Warmerdam

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: June 22, 1915 - Long Beach, California
Deceased: November 13, 2001

Events
Pole Vault - 4.79 m


Few, if any, athletes have ever dominated an event as did "Dutch" Warmerdam in the pole vault during the 1940s. He was the first man to clear 15 feet, accomplishing that feat on April 13, 1940. Over the next two years, he raised the world record to 15' 7 3/4" outdoors, a mark that remained unbroken for 15 years. He also held the world indoor best at 15' 8 1/2". Overall, he had 43 vaults over 15 feet at a time when no other vaulter in the world had yet to clear 15 feet. Warmerdam learned to vault in a cabbage patch with a bamboo pole before enrolling at Fresno State, where he achieved a best clearance of 14' 1 3/4". He later competed for the San Francisco Olympic Club during a period when he won or tied for nine National AAU titles, seven of them outdoors. In 1942, he won the Sullivan Award as the nation's top amateur athlete. His last competition was in 1944 when he cleared 15 feet -- what else? -- at the National AAU meet. Deprived of Olympic competition by World War II, Warmerdam later returned to Fresno State as head track coach.

Records Held
World Record: Pole Vault - 4.77 m (May 23, 1942 - )

Championships
1944 AAU: Pole Vault (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Fresno State (Fresno, California)

Occupations
Coach

Martha Watson

Photo of Martha Watson

Inducted: 1987, athlete

Born: August 19, 1946 - Long Beach, California


Another of the distinguished line of Tennessee State University athletes that included Hall of Famers Wilma Rudolph and Wyomia Tyus, Martha Watson dominated the American women's long jumping scene during much of her career. In 1964, just barely out of high school, she placed second in the long jump at the U.S. Olympic trials to qualify for the American team. She made three more Olympic teams (1968-72-76) as a long jumper, also running a leg on the U.S. 4x100m relay teams in 1972 and 1976. Watson won a total of eight U.S. long jump titles (five indoor, three outdoor) between 1964 and 1976. That included three straight at both the indoor nationals (1974-76) and outdoor nationals (1973-75). Twice, she bettered the American indoor record (20' 11 1/2" in 1970 and 21' 4 3/4" in 1973). At the 1975 Pan American Games, Watson took a silver medal in the long jump and a gold medal in the 4x100m relay.

Championships
1972 Olympics: 400 m relay (4th)
1976 Olympics: 400 m relay (7th)
1973 USA Outdoors: Long Jump (1st)
1974 USA Indoors: Long Jump (1st)
1974 USA Outdoors: Long Jump (1st)
1975 USA Indoors: Long Jump (1st)
1975 USA Outdoors: Long Jump (1st)
1976 USA Indoors: Long Jump (1st)
1975 Pan-Am Games: Long Jump (2nd)
1975 Pan-Am Games: 400 m relay (1st)

Education
high school: Long Beach Poly (Long Beach, California)
undergraduate: Tennessee State (Nashville, Tennessee)

Occupations
Hotel employee

Willye White

Inducted: 1981, athlete

Born: January 1, 1939 - Money, Mississippi

Events
Long Jump - 6.55 m


The first woman to compete for the U.S. in five Olympics, Willye White was the top American long jumper during the 1960s. She was a sophomore in high school when she first appeared in Olympic competition at Melbourne in 1956, taking the silver medal. After enrolling at Tennessee State University under Hall of Fame coach Ed Temple, she appeared in the 1960 Olympics, but failed to make the long jump final. Four years later, she won a silver medal in the 4x100m relay after a 12th in the long jump. She was 11th in the long jump in 1968 and 1972, her other two Olympic appearances. She competed in three Pan-American Games, finishing third in 1959, first in 1963, and third in 1967. A veteran of 34 international teams (including 11 consecutive years of competing in the USA-USSR dual meet), White won a dozen National AAU long jump titles, 11 outdoors. She also set the national long jump record on seven occasions. A member of the Black Sports Hall of Fame and the Women's Sports Foundation Hall of Fame, she established the Willye White Foundation in 1991 to help young girls develop self-esteem and become more productive citizens within their communities.

Championships
1956 Olympics: Long Jump (2nd)
1964 Olympics: Long Jump (12th)
1964 Olympics: 400 m relay (2nd)
1968 Olympics: Long Jump (11th)
1972 Olympics: Long Jump (11th)
1959 Pan-Am Games: Long Jump (3rd)
1963 Pan-Am Games: Long Jump (1st)
1967 Pan-Am Games: Long Jump (3rd)

Education
undergraduate: Tennessee State (Nashville, Tennessee), 1959

Occupations
Philanthropy

Mal (Marvelous Mal) Whitfield

Photo of Mal (Marvelous Mal) Whitfield

Inducted: 1974, athlete

Born: October 11, 1924 - Bay City, Texas

Events
400 m - 45.90
800 yd. - 1:48.60
800 m - 1:47.90
1,000 m - 2:20.80


Mal Whitfield, or "Marvelous Mal" as he was called, held his share of world records but he was an athlete who ran to win, rather than for time. Competitive at any distance from the 220 to the mile, Whitfield put together a record that included two Olympic 800m crowns, six world records and eight National AAU titles, six of them outdoors. A sergeant in the U.S. Air Force while attending Ohio State, Whitfield won national collegiate 880-800 titles in 1948 and 1949. He made his first Olympic team in 1948, taking the 800 in an Olympic record time of 1:49.2 and placing third in the 400. He garnered a second gold medal in the 4x400m relay. After serving as a tail gunner during the Korean War, Whitfield returned to the Olympic stage in Helsinki in1952. There, he repeated his 800m victory, again in 1:49.2, and earned a silver medal in the 4x400m relay. He set a world 880-yard record of 1:49.2 in 1950 and dropped it to 1:48.6 in 1952. Accustomed to doubling at the same meet, Whitfield set a world record in the 1000m at a meet in Eskilstuna, Sweden, then an hour later ran a personal best of 46.2 in the 440-yard run. The 1954 Sullivan Award winner as the top amateur athlete in the U.S., Whitfield later worked for the U.S. State Department in Africa. He was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1988.

Records Held
World Record: 800 yd. - 1:48.60
World Record: 1,000 m - 2:20.80
Olympic Record: 800 m - 1:49.20

Championships
1948 Olympics: 400 m (3rd)
1948 Olympics: 800 m - 1:49.20 (1st)
1948 Olympics: 1,600 m relay (1st)
1952 Olympics: 800 m - 1:49.20 (1st)
1952 Olympics: 1,600 m relay (2nd)
1948 NCAA: 800 m (1st)
1949 NCAA: 800 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Ohio State (Columbus, Ohio)
undergraduate: Cal State Los Angeles (Los Angeles, California), 1956

Occupations
Diplomatic service

Mac Wilkins

Photo of Mac Wilkins

Inducted: 1993, athlete

Born: November 15, 1950 - Eugene, Oregon

Events
Discus Throw - 70.86 m


Mac Wilkins' career spanned 23 years, four Olympic teams and four world records in the discus. He set three of those records on a single day in 1976, during which he raised his prior world record from 226' 11" to 232' 6". A 1973 graduate of the University of Oregon, Wilkins also had lifetime bests of 69' 1 1/4" in the shot put, 208' 10" in the hammer throw and 257' 4" in the javelin. He was nationally ranked in three events but it was in the discus where he achieved his greatest glory. In 1976, Wilkins not only shattered the world record in the event but won the gold medal at the Olympics after setting an Olympic record of 224' 0" in the preliminaries. He was also on the 1980 U.S. Olympic team that didn't compete, placed second at the 1984 Games and was fifth at the 1988 Games. In addition, Wilkins was the 1979 Pan-American Games champion, was second in the 1977 and 1979 World Cups and was 10th at the 1983 World Championships. He was top-ranked in the world in 1976 and 1980 and was the top-ranked U.S. discus thrower eight times, including six in a row from 1976 through 1981.

Records Held
World Record: Discus Throw - 70.86 m (May 1, 1976 - )

Championships
1976 Olympics: Discus Throw (1st)
1984 Olympics: Discus Throw (2nd)
1988 Olympics: Discus Throw (5th)
1977 World Cup: Discus Throw (2nd)
1979 World Cup: Discus Throw (2nd)
1983 World Outdoors: Discus Throw (10th)
1979 Pan-Am Games: Discus Throw (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Oregon (Eugene, Oregon), 1973

Occupations
Schoolteacher

Archie Williams

Photo of Archie Williams

Inducted: 1992, athlete

Born: May 1, 1915 - Oakland, California
Deceased: June 24, 1993

Events
400 m - 46.10


Archie Williams had one great year but he did more in that one year than many athletes achieve in a lifetime. Until 1936, Williams had never broken 49 seconds for the 440-yard run. However, that year he kept lowering his times and reached his peak at the NCAA championships, setting a world 400m record of 46.1 in the preliminaries. He won the final in a time of 47.0. He followed that feat with a victory in the Olympic Trials, then went to Berlin and won the Olympic gold medal in the 400 meters. A serious leg injury ended his running career a year later. After receiving degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of California and aeronautical engineering from the Air Force Engineering School, Williams became a commercial pilot. During World War II, he was a pilot in the Air Force and retired from the military 22 years later as a lieutenant colonel. He later taught mathematics and computer science in California high schools.

Records Held
World Record: 400 m - 46.10 (June 19, 1936 - )

Championships
1936 Olympics: 400 m (1st)
1936 NCAA: 400 m - 47.00 (1st)

Education
undergraduate: California (Berkeley, California)

Occupations
Pilot
Schoolteacher

Fred Wilt

Inducted: 1981, athlete

Born: December 14, 1920 - Pendleton, Indiana
Deceased: September 5, 1994

Events
2 mi. - 8:51
5,000 m - 14:26.80


A contributor to the sport as an athlete, coach and author, Fred Wilt was an outstanding distance runner at Indiana University under Hall of Fame coach Billy Hayes before becoming an Olympic competitor while running for the New York A.C. Wilt competed in two Olympic 10,000-meter finals, finishing 11th in 1948 and 21st in 1952. He won eight National AAU titles, ranging from the indoor mile in 1951 to three championships in cross country. While at Indiana in 1941, he claimed two national collegiate titles, one in cross country and the other in the two mile. In 1950, Wilt was named the Sullivan Award winner as the nation's top amateur athlete. Two years later, at age 32, Wilt set an indoor world record in the two-mile run and later that year, broke an 18-year-old American record with a time of 14:26.8 for 5000 meters. An FBI agent during his competitive days, Wilt's interest later turned to the technical side of track and field. His book, How they Train, was a long-time best seller. He also helped start Track Technique, one of the best technical journals in the world.

Records Held
World Record: 2 mi. - 8:51 (February 23, 1952 - )
World Record: 5,000 m - 14:26.80

Championships
1948 Olympics: 10,000 m (11th)
1952 Olympics: 10,000 m (21st)
1951 AAU Indoors: 1 mi. (1st)
1941 NCAA: 2 mi. (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Indiana (Bloomington, Indiana), 1941

Occupations
FBI agent
Coach
Author

Lloyd (Bud) Winter

Inducted: 1985, coach

Born: June 8, 1909 - San Francisco, California
Deceased: December 6, 1985


During the late 1960s, San Jose, Calif., had the nickname "Speed City" and Lloyd "Bud" Winter certainly was a major factor in that fame. One of the greatest sprint coaches in the world, Winter tutored some of the fastest athletes in track and field history, including fellow Hall of Famers Harold Davis, Lee Evans and Tommie Smith. Over a 35-year coaching career, he produced 102 All-Americans at San Jose State University and 27 of them became Olympians. Winter himself served as an assistant Olympic coach in 1960. His coaching skills were by no means limited to sprinting. One of his prize pupils was Greece's Chris Papanicolaou, the first man to pole vault 18 feet. Winter organized the first international coaches' clinic in 1956 and he also authored several coaching manuals, including "So You Want to be a Sprinter," one of the leading works on the subject.

Occupations
Coach

Rick Wohlhuter

Photo of Rick Wohlhuter

Inducted: 1990, athlete

Born: December 23, 1948 - Geneva, Illinois

Events
800 m - 1:43.90
880 yd. - 1:44.10
1 mi. - 3:53.30


The top American half miler of the mid-1970s, Rick Wohlhuter was a two-time Olympian and the last American man to qualify for the Games in both the 800 and 1500m events. A Notre Dame graduate, Wohlhuter won the IC4A 880-yard title in 1971 and in 1972 qualified for his first Olympic team. A fall in the 800m heats at Munich cost him a chance for a medal. Between Olympics, the 5' 9", 130-pound Wohlhuter broke the U.S. record for the 800 meters on two occasions and twice set world records for the 880-yard event. He added a world record for the 1,000 meters in 1974, beginning a three-year lock on the U.S. indoor 1,000-yard title. Wohlhuter also won national outdoor 800m titles in 1973 and 1974. His great 1974 season earned him the Sullivan Award as the nation's top amateur athlete. In 1976, he qualified for the Olympics in both the 800 and 1,500 meters. At Montreal, Wohhuter took a bronze in the 800 and placed sixth in the 1,500. He later became a salesman and financial consultant.

Records Held
World Record: 880 yd. - 1:44.10 (June 8, 1974 - )
American Record: 800 m - 1:43.90

Championships
1976 Olympics: 800 m (3rd)
1976 Olympics: 1,500 m (6th)
1973 USA Outdoors: 800 m (1st)
1974 USA Outdoors: 800 m (1st)
1971 IC4A: 880 yd. (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Notre Dame (South Bend, Indiana), 1971

Occupations
Salesman
Financial consultant

Vern Wolfe

Photo of Vern Wolfe

Inducted: 1996, coach

Born: July 14, 1922 - Garber, Oklahoma
Deceased: October 26, 2000


An outstanding coach on both the high school and collegiate levels, Vern Wolfe was one of the first exponents of weight conditioning as a training device. A pole vaulter for the University of Southern California in the late 1940s, Wolfe began his coaching career at Torrance (Calif.) High School in 1952 and spent 1955 to 1960 at North Phoenix (Ariz.) High School, where he produced national high school record holders in the pole vault, shot put and discus. Wolfe returned to USC as head coach in 1963 and remained there until retiring in 1984. His Trojan teams won seven NCAA indoor and outdoor titles, as well as eight conference titles and had a dual meet winning record of 87 percent. Six athletes who trained under Wolfe went on to win Olympic gold medals, including Hall of Famers Dallas Long (shot put), Mile Larrabee (400m) and Bob Seagren (pole vault). Wolfe also produced 24 athletes who set or tied world records and 29 individual champions.

Education
undergraduate: USC (Los Angeles, California), 1947

Occupations
Coach

John Woodruff

Inducted: 1978, athlete

Born: July 5, 1915 - Connellsville, Pennsylvania


While only a freshman at the University of Pittsburgh in 1936, John Woodruff took the track world by storm by finishing second in the 800 meters at the National AAU meet, then winning the Olympic Trials. Despite his inexperience, he was quickly established as the favorite at the Berlin Olympics. He didn't disappoint, though he had an anxious moment in the final when he found himself boxed in. He pulled a tactical coup, virtually slowing to a stop and waiting until the entire field passed him, then moving into the third lane and sprinting from last to first. His winning time was 1:52.9. During a career that was curtailed by World War II, Woodruff won three-straight national collegiate titles and also took the National AAU 880 in 1937. The American record holder at 800 meters with a 1:48.6 in 1940, Woodruff also held a share of the world 4x880-yard record while competing with the U.S. national team. He later became a career army officer.

Records Held
American Record: 800 m - 1:48.60 (June 7, 1940 - )

Championships
1936 Olympics: 800 m - 1:52.90 (1st)
1936 AAU: 800 m (2nd)
1937 AAU: 880 yd. (1st)

Education
high school: Connellsville (Connellsville, Pennsylvania), 1935
undergraduate: Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania), 1939

Occupations
Military officer
Schoolteacher
Recreation director

Dave Wottle

Photo of Dave Wottle

Inducted: 1982, athlete

Born: August 7, 1950 - Canton, Ohio

Events
800 m - 1:44.30
1 mi. - 3:53.30


Dave Wottle's dramatic stretch run earned him an upset victory in the 800 meters and established him as one of the stars of the 1972 Olympic Games. As a student at Bowling Green State University, Wottle first came on the national scene in 1970 when he finished second in the NCAA championship mile. Injuries sidelined him in 1971 but a year later he came back and won the national collegiate 1500m and the National AAU 800m before tying the world 800 record of 1:44.3 at the Olympic Trials. He also qualified in the 1500m, but was eliminated in the semi-finals of that event. In 1973, he won the NCAA mile in 1973, then turned professional and eventually became a college track coach and academic administrator at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tenn.

Records Held
World Record: 800 m - 1:44.30 (July 1, 1972 - )

Championships
1972 Olympics: 800 m (1st)
1972 AAU: 800 m (1st)
1970 NCAA: 1 mi. (2nd)
1972 NCAA: 1,500 m (1st)
1973 NCAA: 1 mi. (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Bowling Green State (Bowling Green, Ohio), 1973

Occupations
Academic administrator
Coach

Stan Wright

Photo of Stan Wright

Inducted: 1993, coach

Born: August 11, 1921 - Englewood, New Jersey
Deceased: November 6, 1998


One of the greatest sprint coaches in U.S. track and field history, Stan Wright served the sport for more than 40 years both as a coach and administrator. His greatest coaching fame came at Texas Southern University, where his team frequently dominated the Texas, Kansas and Drake Relays. His athletes went on to achieve major honors and four became Olympians, including Jimmy Hines, who became world record holder in the 100m dash and a member of the Hall of Fame. Wright's numerous international coaching assignments included being named assistant coach of the U.S. Olympic men's team in 1968 and 1972. At the 1968 Games, athletes coached by Wright won six gold medals, three silver medals and four bronze medals and set five world records. After leaving Texas Southern in 1967, he coached at Western Illinois for two years before moving to California State University at Sacramento. He left there in 1979 to become athletic director at Fairleigh Dickinson University in New Jersey. The author of numerous articles and publications, Wright also served for many years with the U.S. Olympic Committee and The Athletics Congress (the predecessor of USATF). He was TAC treasurer from 1989 to 1992 and chairman of the organization's budget and finance committee from 1980 to 1989.

Occupations
Coach
Administrator

Frank Wykoff

Photo of Frank Wykoff

Inducted: 1977, athlete

Born: October 29, 1909 - Des Moines, Iowa
Deceased: January 1, 1980

Events
100 yd. - 9.40


An outstanding sprinter while at Glendale High School in California, Frank Wykoff took his place in track and field history by becoming the first man to win three Olympic relay gold medals, all in world-record time. Although only 19, Wykoff made his first Olympic team in 1928, winning the gold medal in the 4x100m relay after placing fourth in the open 100. He enrolled at the University of Southern California where he came under the tutelage of Hall of Fame coach Dean Cromwell. In 1930, Wykoff ran the first official 9.4 for 100 yards. He also won the national collegiate 100-yard dash titles in 1930 and 1931 and was a two-time National AAU champion in 1928 and 1932. He made the 1932 Olympic team on the 4x100m relay and again earned a gold medal in that event. Four years later, Wykoff was fourth in the 100 meters and ran the anchor leg on the world-record-setting 4x100m team that included Hall of Famers Jesse Owens and Ralph Metcalfe. Wykoff later worked for the Los Angeles school system for many years. He was elected to the U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame in 1984.

Records Held
World Record: 100 yd. - 9.40 (June 7, 1930 - )

Championships
1928 Olympics: 100 m (4th)
1928 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1932 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1936 Olympics: 100 m (4th)
1936 Olympics: 400 m relay (1st)
1928 AAU: 100 yd. (1st)
1932 AAU: 100 yd. (1st)
1930 NCAA: 100 yd. (1st)
1931 NCAA: 100 yd. (1st)

Education
high school: Glendale (Glendale, California)
junior college: Glendale College
undergraduate: USC (Los Angeles, California), 1932

Occupations
Educational administration

Joe Yancey

Inducted: 1984, coach

Born: October 12, 1910 - New York, New York
Deceased: February 22, 1991


A product of New York City's "Hell's Kitchen," Joe Yancey had a coaching career that spanned a half century. As co-founder of the New York Pioneer Club, he tutored many of the sport's great athletes, including Olympic sprint champion and fellow Hall of Famer Andy Stanfield. Yancey attended Virginia State College before graduating from New York University in 1935. He became the Pioneer Club's volunteer coach in 1936. He subsequently coached numerous indoor and outdoor national champions, including 18 Olympians who competed on five different Olympic teams. Besides Stanfield, other Olympic gold medalists included Lou Jones, Herb McKenley, George Rhoden, Arthur Went and Lloyd LaBeach. In 1948, 1952 and 1956, Yancey coached the Jamaican Olympic team. A member of the Black Athletes Hall of Fame, he was the recipient of the Bob Giegengack Award in 1983 for outstanding service to track and field. In addition to coaching, Yancey worked for the Internal Revenue Service.

Education
undergraduate: New York (New York, New York), 1935

Occupations
Coach
IRS representative

George Young

Photo of George Young

Inducted: 1981, athlete

Born: July 24, 1937 - Roswell, New Mexico

Events
3,000 m steeplechase - 8:30.60
2 mi. - 8:22
3 mi. - 13:10
5,000 m - 13:29.40


George Young's first major breakthrough came during his senior year at the University of Arizona when he first took up the 3000m steeplechase. Despite his inexperience at the event, he finished second at the National AAU championship and a year later, qualified for the first of his four Olympic teams. At the Rome Olympics, Young tripped over a hurdle and failed to make the final. However, a year later, he set the first of his six American records when he ran 8:31.0 in the steeplechase. In 1964, Young improved to fifth in the event at the Tokyo Olympics. Four years later, he won the bronze medal and also competed in the marathon, placing 16th. Earlier in 1968, he improved the American record in the steeplechase to 8:30.6 and set a second record in the 2 miles, running 8:22.0 to defeat world record-holder Rom Clarke of Australia. The following year, Young set world indoor records for the 2 mile (8:27.2) and 3 mile (13:09.8). In 1972, he competed in his fourth Olympic Games, but was eliminated in the 5000m prelims. During his career, he won seven national AAU titles ranging from the steeplechase to the marathon. He later became a schoolteacher and coach in Arizona.

Records Held
World Record: 3 mi. - 13:10
American Record: 3,000 m steeplechase - 8:30.60
American Record: 2 mi. - 8:22

Championships
1964 Olympics: 3,000 m steeplechase (5th)
1968 Olympics: 3,000 m steeplechase (3rd)
1968 Olympics: marathon (16th)
1959 AAU: 3,000 m steeplechase (2nd)

Education
high school: Western (Silver City, New Mexico), 1955
undergraduate: Arizona (Tuscon, Arizona), 1959

Occupations
Schoolteacher
Coach

Larry Young

Photo of Larry Young

Inducted: 2002, athlete

Born: February 10, 1943 - ,

Events
50 km race walk - 4:00:46
100 mi. race walk - 18:07:12


One of the most successful athletes in U.S. race walking history, Larry Young was the last American walker to win an Olympic medal, taking third in 50 km. walk at both the 1968 and 1972 Games. The winner of 30 national titles, Young won eight U.S. crowns at 50 km. and never lost a championship race at that distance. In 1972, he won eight national titles at various distances from two miles to 100 miles. He was also the 1967 and 1971 Pan American Games champion at 50 km and represented the U.S. in international competition eight times. Young held American records for both the 50 km. and 100-mile racewalk. A full-time artist since the 1970s, Young has placed over 50 monumental outdoor sculptures both in the U.S. and internationally. He owns and operates Larry Young Sculpture, a 6,000-suare-foot foundry in Columbia, Mo., where he personally creates and produces most of his work.

Championships
1968 Olympics: 50 km race walk (3rd)
1972 Olympics: 50 km race walk (3rd)
1967 Pan-Am Games: 50 km race walk (1st)
1971 Pan-Am Games: 50 km race walk (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Columbia College (Columbia, Missouri), 1976

Occupations
Sculptor

John Carlos

Inducted: 2003, athlete

Born: June 5, 1945 - New York, New York

Events
100 yd. - 9.10
200 m - 20.00


At the 1968 Olympic Trials, John Carlos stunned the track world when he beat Tommie Smith in the 200 meter finals and surpassed Smith's world record by 0.3 second. Though the record was never ratified because the spike formation on Carlos' shoes wasn't accepted at the time, the race reinforced his status as a world-class sprinter. After finishing third to Smith in the 200 meters at the Mexico Olympics, Carlos had his greatest year in 1969, equaling the world 100-yard record of 9.1, winning the AAU 220-yard run, and leading San Jose State to its first NCAA championship with victories in the 100 and 220 and as a member of the 4x110-yard relay. Carlos was also gold medalist at 200 meters at the 1967 Pan-American Games and set indoor world bests in the 60-yard dash (5.9) and 220-yard dash (20.2). Prior to his successful collegiate career at San Jose State University under Hall of Fame coach Bud Winter, Carlos attended East Texas State University, where he single-handedly won the school's first Lone Star Conference Championship. Following his track career, Carlos tried professional football, where a knee injury curtailed his one-year stint with the Philadelphia Eagles. He then went on to the Canadian Football League where he played one season each for the Montreal Alouettes and the Toronto Argonauts. In 1985, he became a counselor and in-school suspension supervisor at Palm Springs (Calif.) High School.

Records Held
World Record: 100 yd. - 9.10

Championships
1968 Olympics: 200 m (3rd)
1969 AAU: 220 yd. (1st)
1967 Pan-Am Games: 200 m (1st)
1969 NCAA: 100 yd. (1st)
1969 NCAA: 220 yd. (1st)
1969 NCAA: 440 yd. relay (1st)

Education
undergraduate: East Texas State (Commerce, Texas)
undergraduate: San Jose State (San Jose, California), 1970

Occupations
Educational counselor/supervisor
Public speaker

Mary Slaney (Decker)

Inducted: 2003, athlete

Born: August 4, 1958 - Bunnvale, New Jersey

Events
800 m - 1:56.90
1,500 m - 3:57.12
1 mi. - 4:16.71
3,000 m - 8:25.83
5,000 m - 15:06.53
10,000 m - 31:35.30


The only athlete ever to hold every American record from 800 meters to 10,000 meters, Mary Decker Slaney continues to own the U.S. women's records in the 1500 (3:57.12), mile (4:16.71) and 3000 (8:25.83). Her greatest international achievement came at the 1983 World Championships in Helsinki, where she won the 1500 and 3000 meters -- a feat that would become known as the "Decker Double" and that helped earn her the title of Sports Illustrated's Sportsperson of the Year for 1983. A year earlier, she set world records in the mile (4:18.08), 2000m (5:32.7), 3000m indoors (8:47.3), 5000m (15:08.26) and 10,000m (31.35.3, in her first race at that distance), and won the AAU Sullivan Award. Over her career, Decker Slaney set 36 national records and 17 official and unofficial world records at various distances. A six-time winner at the Millrose Games in New York, she won her first Millrose crown at age 15 and her last at age 38. Decker Slaney first received international fame at the age of 14 with a surprise victory in the 800 meters at a USA vs. USSR dual meet, and she went on to qualify for four Olympic teams. She competed in her final Olympics in 1996 at the age of 37.

Records Held
American Record: 800 m - 1:56.90 (August 16, 1985 - )
American Record: 1,500 m - 3:57.12 (July 26, 1983 - )
American Record: 1 mi. - 4:16.71 (August 21, 1985 - )
American Record: 3,000 m - 8:25.83 (September 7, 1985 - )
American Record: 5,000 m - 15:06.53 (June 1, 1985 - )
American Record: 10,000 m - 31:35.30 (July 16, 1982 - )

Championships
1988 Olympics: 1,500 m (8th)
1988 Olympics: 3,000 m (10th)
1983 World Outdoors: 1,500 m (1st)
1983 World Outdoors: 3,000 m (1st)

Education
high school: Orange (Orange, California), 1976
undergraduate: Colorado (Boulder, Colorado), 1978

Occupations
Runner

Larry James

Photo of Larry James

Inducted: 2003, athlete

Born: November 6, 1947

Events
400 m - 43.97


A double medalist at the 1968 Olympic Games in Mexico City, Larry James also set world records and won NCAA titles during his track career. James won the silver medal in the 400 meters with his time of 43.97 seconds at the 1968 Olympics, bettering the existing world record but placing him second behind teammate (and fellow Hall of Famer) Lee Evans (43.86). James added a gold medal at the Mexico City Games by running the third leg on the U.S. 4x400m relay team, which set a world record of 2:56.16 seconds, which lasted until 1992. James set the 400m world record of 44.1 seconds in placing second to Evans at the 1968 Olympic Trials at Echo Summit, Calif., when Evans' winning time of 44.0 was disallowed by the IAAF because he wore illegal brush spike shoes. James was a double gold medalist at the 1970 World University Games, winning the 400m hurdles and running the anchor leg on Team USA's 4x400m relay team (3:03.33). As a collegian at Villanova under Hall of Fame coach Jumbo Elliott, James won the NCAA 440 title in 1970 and NCAA indoor crowns at that distance in 1968, 1969 and 1970. At the 1968 Penn Relays, his anchor leg of 43.9 was the fastest ever run in the history of the relay carnival and sparked Villanova's scintillating comeback victory over Rice University. James was also the head manager for Team USA at the 2003 World Outdoor Championships.

Records Held
World Record: 1,600 m relay - 2:56.16

Championships
1968 Olympics: 400 m - 43.97 (2nd)
1968 Olympics: 1,600 m relay - 2:56.16 (1st)
1970 World University Games: 400 m hurdles (1st)
1970 World University Games: 1,600 m relay - 3:03.33 (1st)
1968 NCAA Indoors: 440 yd. (1st)
1969 NCAA Indoors: 440 yd. (1st)
1970 NCAA Indoors: 440 yd. (1st)
1970 NCAA Outdoors: 440 yd. (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Villanova (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), 1970

Occupations
Academician

Mike Larrabee

Photo of Mike Larrabee

Inducted: 2003, athlete

Born: December 2, 1933
Deceased: April 22, 2003

Events
400 m - 44.90


A double gold medalist at the 1964 Olympics, Mike Larrabee turned in one of the Games' most memorable performances. Coming into the homestretch of the 400 meter final, Larrabee was in fifth place. The 30-year-old schoolteacher put on a burst of speed to pass the four runners ahead of him and claim the gold medal in 45.1 seconds. Larrabee also ran the second leg (44.8) on Team USA's gold medal winning 4x400m relay team that set a world record of 3:00.7. Larrabee's performances in Tokyo capped a banner year in which he equaled the world record of 44.9 in winning the 400 meters at the Olympic Trials in Los Angeles. As a collegian, he competed for the University of Southern California, where he was part of the Trojans' 1954 and 1955 NCAA championship teams. Post-collegiately, he ran for the Southern California Striders. After two failed attempts to make the Olympic team (in 1956 and 1960), Larrabee made the wait pay off in 1964.

Records Held
World Record: 400 m - 44.90 (September 12, 1964 - )
World Record: 1,600 m relay - 3:00.70

Championships
1964 Olympics: 400 m - 45.10 (1st)
1964 Olympics: 1,600 m relay - 3:00.70 (1st)

Education
undergraduate: USC (Los Angeles, California), 1955

Occupations
Teacher
Sales representative

Mike Conley

Photo of Mike Conley

Inducted: 2004, athlete

Born: October 5, 1962 - Chicago, Illinois

Events
Triple Jump - 17.86 m
Long Jump - 8.46 m


Possibly the greatest combination long and triple jumper of all time, Mike Conley was ranked top ten in the world an amazing ten times in the long jump and 14 times in the triple jump. A two-time Olympic triple jump medalist (silver in 1984, gold in 1992), Conley was a five-time World Outdoor Championships team member, winning the bronze medal in long jump in 1983, triple jump silver medal in 1987, bronze in 1991 and gold in 1993. A two-time World Indoor Championships team member, he won the long jump bronze medal in 1989. He also won the gold medal in the triple jump in 1987 & 1989 at the World Indoor Championships. Conley was the World Cup long jump champion in 1985, and triple jump champion in 1989. A six-time USA Outdoor triple jump champion, Conley also won the long jump at the 1985 USA Outdoor Championships, furthering his place as one of the greatest combination long and triple jumpers ever. As a collegian at the University of Arkansas, Conley was the NCAA Indoor and Outdoor long and triple jump champion in 1984-’85, and the NCAA Indoor triple jump champion in 1983, 1984 & 1985. The former world indoor triple jump record holder, Conley owns the current U.S. triple jump indoor record at 17.76 meters/58 feet, 3.25 inches.

Records Held
World Record (indoor): Triple Jump - 17.76 m (February 27, 1987 - )
American Record (indoor): Triple Jump - 17.76 m (February 27, 1987 - )

Championships
1984 Olympic Games: Triple Jump (2nd)
1992 Olympic Games: Triple Jump - 17.63 m (1st)
1983 World Outdoor Championships: Long Jump (3rd)
1985 World Cup: Long Jump (1st)
1987 World Indoor Championships: Triple Jump - 17.54 m (1st)
1987 World Outdoor Championships: Triple Jump (2nd)
1989 World Cup: Triple Jump (1st)
1989 World Indoor Championships: Triple Jump - 17.65 m (1st)
1989 World Indoor Championships: Long Jump (3rd)
1993 World Outdoor Championships: Triple Jump - 17.86 m (1st)
1984 U.S. Olympic Trials: Triple Jump - 17.50 m (1st)
1985 USA Indoor Championships: Long Jump - 8.22 m (1st)
1985 USA Indoor Championships: Triple Jump - 17.40 m (1st)
1985 USA Outdoor Championships: Long Jump - 8.53 m (1st)
1986 USA Indoor Championships: Long Jump - 8.27 m (1st)
1986 USA Indoor Championships: Triple Jump - 17.34 m (1st)
1987 USA Indoor Championships: Triple Jump - 17.76 m (1st)
1987 USA Outdoor Championships: Triple Jump - 17.87 m (1st)
1988 USA Outdoor Championships: Triple Jump - 17.35 m (1st)
1989 USA Outdoor Championships: Triple Jump - 17.50 m (1st)
1992 USA Indoor Championships: Triple Jump - 16.98 m (1st)
1993 USA Outdoor Championships: Triple Jump - 17.69 m (1st)
1994 USA Outdoor Championships: Triple Jump - 17.51 m (1st)
1995 USA Outdoor Championships: Triple Jump - 17.18 m (1st)
1983 NCAA Indoor: Triple Jump - 17.22 m (1st)
1983 NCAA Indoor: Triple Jump (1st)
1984 NCAA Indoor: Triple Jump - 16.98 m (1st)
1984 NCAA Indoor: Long Jump (1st)
1984 NCAA Indoor: Triple Jump (1st)
1984 NCAA Oudoor: Triple Jump - 17.35 m (1st)
1984 NCAA Oudoor: Long Jump - 8.23 m (1st)
1984 NCAA Outdoor: Long Jump (1st)
1984 NCAA Outdoor: Triple Jump (1st)
1985 NCAA Indoor: Triple Jump - 17.06 m (1st)
1985 NCAA Indoor: Long Jump (1st)
1985 NCAA Indoor: Triple Jump (1st)
1985 NCAA Outdoor: Triple Jump - 17.72 m (1st)
1985 NCAA Outdoor: Long Jump - 8.28 m (1st)
1985 NCAA Outdoor: Long Jump (1st)
1985 NCAA Outdoor: Triple Jump (1st)

Education
high school: Luther South HS (Chicago, Illinois), 1981
undergraduate: University of Arkansas (Fayetteville, Arkansas), 1985

Occupations
USA Track & Field Executive Director of Elite Athlete Programs

Michael Johnson

Photo of Michael Johnson

Inducted: 2004, athlete

Born: September 13, 1967 - Dallas, Texas

Events
200 m - 19.32
400 m - 43.18


The current world and American record holder in the 200 and 400 meters, Michael Johnson became the first man in history to win both those events at the same Olympics in 1996 at Atlanta. He became the only man to repeat as Olympic 400m champion when he won the gold in 2000. Johnson owns more world outdoor championships than anyone in history (9) and ran the anchor leg on the U.S. squad that set the existing 4x400m relay world record in 1998. Johnson, who set the 200m world record on two occasions, is a three-time Olympian Also as an Olympian, he won 4x400m relay gold medals in 1996 & 2000. A five-time World Outdoor Championships team member, Johnson won the 200m gold medal in 1991, '95, the 400m gold medal in 1993, '95, '97, '99, and World Outdoor Championships 4x400m gold medals in 1993, '95, '99. Johnson was a member of teams that set 4x400m relay world records in 1992-'93, '98. A five-time USA Outdoor 200m champion, Johnson won the USA Outdoor 400m title on four occasions, and he won the USA Indoor 400m championship four times. As a collegiate star at Baylor University, Johnson won the 1990 NCAA Outdoor 200m title, and was a two-time NCAA Indoor 200m champion. He was world ranked 11 times at 200m (#1 five times), and world ranked 11 times at 400m (#1 10 times).

Records Held
World Record: 200 m - 19.66 (June 23, 1996 - )
World Record: 200 m - 19.32 (August 1, 1996 - )
World Record (indoor): 400 m - 44.63 (March 4, 1995 - )
World Record: 400 m - 43.18 (August 26, 1999 - )

Championships
1996 Olympic Games: 200 m - 19.32 (1st)
1996 Olympic Games: 400 m - 43.49 (1st)
1996 Olympic Games: 1,600 m relay - 2:55.99 (1st)
2000 Olympic Games: 400 m - 43.84 (1st)
2000 Olympic Games: 1,600 m relay - 2:56.35 (1st)
1991 World Outdoor Championships: 200 m - 20.01 (1st)
1993 World Outdoor Championships: 400 m - 43.65 (1st)
1993 World Outdoor Championships: 1,600 m relay - 2:54.29 (1st)
1995 World Outdoor Championships: 200 m - 19.79 (1st)
1995 World Outdoor Championships: 400 m - 43.39 (1st)
1995 World Outdoor Championships: 1,600 m relay - 2:57.32 (1st)
1997 World Outdoor Championships: 400 m - 44.12 (1st)
1999 World Outdoor Championships: 400 m - 43.18 (1st)
1999 World Outdoor Championships: 1,600 m relay - 2:56.45 (1st)
1990 USA Indoor Championships: 400 m - 47.43 (1st)
1990 USA Outdoor Championships: 200 m - 19.90 (1st)
1991 USA Indoor Championships: 400 m - 46.70 (1st)
1991 USA Outdoor Championships: 200 m - 20.31 (1st)
1992 U.S. Olympic Trials: 200 m - 19.79 (1st)
1993 USA Outdoor Championships: 400 m - 43.74 (1st)
1995 USA Indoor Championships: 400 m - 44.63 (1st)
1995 USA Outdoor Championships: 200 m - 19.83 (1st)
1995 USA Outdoor Championships: 400 m - 43.66 (1st)
1996 U.S. Olympic Trials: 200 m - 19.66 (1st)
1996 USA Indoor Championships: 400 m - 44.66 (1st)
1990 NCAA Outdoor: 200 m (1st)

Education
high school: Skyline (Dallas, Texas), 1986
undergraduate: Baylor University (Waco, Texas), 1990

Occupations
Sports agent

Jackie Joyner-Kersee

Photo of Jackie Joyner-Kersee

Inducted: 2004, athlete

Born: March 3, 1962 - East St. Louis, Illinois

Events
Heptathlon - 7291 pts.
Long Jump - 7.49 m
100 m hurdles - 12.61


Considered by many to be the greatest female all-around athlete in history, Jackie Joyner-Kersee's achievements include three Olympic gold medals, four World Outdoor Championships gold medals, and the still-standing world record of 7,291 points in the women's heptathlon. JJK was a four-time Olympian, who won the long jump gold medal in 1988, and long jump bronze in 1992 and 1996. In Olympic heptathlon competition she won the silver medal in 1984 and the gold medal in 1988 and 1992. A four-time World Outdoor Championships team member, she won long jump gold medals in 1987 and 1991, and heptathlon gold in 1987 and 1993. The USA 100m hurdles champion in 1994, JJK won the national long jump title nine times, and the national championship in the heptathlon on eight occasions. During her career at the USA Indoor Championships, she won the 60m hurdles title in 1992, and the long jump national crown in 1992, '94, '95. As a collegian at UCLA, Joyner-Kersee won the NCAA heptathlon title in 1982, 1983. The former long jump world record holder, she set the heptathlon world record three times and was a two-time 100mH U.S. record holder, four-time U.S. long jump record holder, two-time U.S. 60m hurdles record holder and six-time and current U.S. indoor long jump record holder. She is the current U.S. indoor 50mH, 55mH and 60mH record holder. JJK, the first woman ever to break 7,000 points in the heptathlon, was world ranked three times at 100m hurdles, 11 times at LJ (#1 three times) and 11 times in the heptathlon (#1 six times).

Records Held
World Record: Heptathlon - 7148 pts.
World Record: Heptathlon - 7158 pts.
World Record: Heptathlon - 7215 pts.
World Record: Heptathlon - 7291 pts.
World Record: Long Jump - 7.45 m (August 13, 1987 - )
American Record (indoor): Long Jump - 7.13 m (March 5, 1994 - )
American Record (indoor): 50 m hurdles - 6.67 (February 10, 1995 - )
American Record (indoor): 55 m hurdles - 7.37 (February 3, 1989 - )

Championships
1984 Olympic Games: Heptathlon (2nd)
1988 Olympic Games: Heptathlon - 7291 pts. (1st)
1988 Olympic Games: Long Jump - 7.40 m (1st)
1992 Olympic Games: Heptathlon - 7044 pts. (1st)
1992 Olympic Games: Long Jump - 7.07 m (3rd)
1996 Olympic Games: Long Jump - 7.00 m (3rd)
1982 USA Outdoor Championships: Heptathlon - 6041 pts. (1st)
1984 U.S. Olympic Trials: Heptathlon - 6520 pts. (1st)
1986 USA Indoor Championships: Long Jump - 6.97 m (1st)
1987 USA Indoor Championships: 60 m hurdles - 7.64 (1st)
1987 USA Outdoor Championships: Long Jump - 280.50 m (1st)
1987 USA Outdoor Championships: Heptathlon - 6979 pts. (1st)
1988 U.S. Olympic Trials: Heptathlon - 7215 pts. (1st)
1988 U.S. Olympic Trials: Long Jump - 7.45 m (1st)
1990 USA Outdoor Championships: Long Jump - 7.08 m (1st)
1991 USA Outdoor Championships: Long Jump - 6.91 m (1st)
1991 USA Outdoor Championships: Heptathlon - 6878 pts. (1st)
1992 U.S. Olympic Trials: Long Jump - 7.08 m (1st)
1992 U.S. Olympic Trials: Heptathlon - 6695 pts. (1st)
1992 USA Indoor Championships: Long Jump - 6.84 m (1st)
1992 USA Indoor Championships: 60 m hurdles - 8.07 (1st)
1993 USA Outdoor Championships: Long Jump - 7.02 m (1st)
1993 USA Outdoor Championships: Heptathlon - 6770 pts. (1st)
1994 USA Indoor Championships: Long Jump - 7.13 m (1st)
1994 USA Outdoor Championships: Long Jump - 7.14 m (1st)
1994 USA Outdoor Championships: 100 m hurdles - 12.88 (1st)
1995 USA Indoor Championships: Long Jump - 6.72 m (1st)
1995 USA Outdoor Championships: Long Jump - 6.88 m (1st)
1995 USA Outdoor Championships: Heptathlon - 6375 pts. (1st)
1996 U.S. Olympic Trials: Long Jump - 7.04 m (1st)
1982 NCAA: Heptathlon (1st)
1983 NCAA: Heptathlon (1st)

Education
high school: Lincoln HS (East St. Louis, Illinois), 1980
undergraduate: UCLA (Los Angeles, California), 1985

Joan Samuelson (Benoit)

Photo of Joan Samuelson (Benoit)

Inducted: 2004, athlete

Born: May 16, 1957 - Cape Elizabeth, Maine

Events
10,000 m - 32:07.41
marathon - 2:21:21


The winner of the first Olympic women's marathon at the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, Joan Samuelson is synonymous with the increased popularity of long distance running in the United States. Samuelson won the Olympic Trials Marathon at age 26, just 17 days following agonizing knee surgery. Samuelson, who was ranked #1 in the world in the marathon on two occasions, is a former world and U.S. record holder in that event. She was the 1981 U.S. 10,000m champion and the 1984 U.S. women's marathon champion. Samuelson set the world and U.S. women's marathon record in 1984, and set the U.S. women's marathon record on four occasions. She was ranked #4 in the world at 10,000m in 1984, and she was world ranked five-times in the marathon (#1 two times). She is a pioneer of women's marathoning, who won the 1979 and 1983 Boston Marathons, the 1992 Columbus Marathon and the 1985 Chicago Marathon. In 1985, she was awarded the prestigious AAU Sullivan Award as the nation's finest amateur athlete…she is the mother of two daughters, Abby and Anders.

Records Held
World Record (road): marathon - 2:22:43
American Record (road): half-marathon - 1:08:34
American Record (road): 25 km - 1:24:43
American Record (road): marathon - 2:21:21

Championships
1984 Olympic Games: marathon - 2:24:52 (1st)
1981 USA Outdoor Championships: 10,000 m - 33:37.50 (1st)
1984 U.S. Olympic Trials: marathon - 2:31:04 (1st)
1983 Pan-Am Games: 3,000 m - 9:14.19 (1st)

Education
high school: Cape Elizabeth HS (Cape Elizabeth, Maine), 1975
undergraduate: Bowdoin College (Brunswick, Maine), 1979

Occupations
Author
Motivational speaker

Jack Davis

Inducted: 2004, athlete

Born: September 11, 1930 - Amarillo, Texas

Events
110 m hurdles - 13.40


One of a long line of magnificent U.S. men's high hurdlers, Jack Davis was the silver medalist in the 110m hurdles at the 1952 and 1956 Olympic Games. Also known for his versatility, Davis was a three-time U.S. Outdoor 220y hurdles champion, and the 1953 NCAA 220y hurdle champion. A former world and American record holder in the 110m/120y hurdles, Davis was ranked #1 in the world on three occasions. A three-time USA 110m hurdles champion, Davis also was a three-time USA Outdoor 220y champion and the 1954 USA Indoor 60y hurdle champion. During his college days at USC, Davis was a three-time NCAA 120y hurdle champion and the 1953 NCAA 220y hurdle champion. He was world ranked in 110m hurdles six times and completed remarkable undefeated seasons in the 110mH/120yH in 1953 and 1954.

Records Held
World Record: 120 yd. hurdles - 13.50 (June 9, 1956 - )
World Record: 120 yd. hurdles - 13.30 (November 17, 1956 - )
World Record: 110 m hurdles - 13.40 (June 22, 1956 - )

Championships
1952 Olympic Games: 110 m hurdles (2nd)
1956 Olympic Games: 110 m hurdles (2nd)
1951 USA Outdoor Championships: 200 yd. hurdles - 23.20 (1st)
1953 USA Outdoor Championships: 120 yd. hurdles - 13.90 (1st)
1953 USA Outdoor Championships: 200 yd. hurdles - 23.70 (1st)
1954 USA Outdoor Championships: 120 yd. hurdles - 14.00 (1st)
1954 USA Outdoor Championships: 200 yd. hurdles - 23.20 (1st)
1956 U.S. Olympic Trials: 110 m hurdles - 13.80 (1st)
1953 NCAA Outdoor: 220 yd. hurdles - 23.30 (1st)

Education
high school: Glendale Hoover HS (Glendale, California), 1949
undergraduate: University of Southern California (Los Angeles, California), 1953

Occupations
Business executive

Otis Davis

Inducted: 2004, athlete

Born: July 12, 1932 - Tuscaloosa, Alabama

Events
400 m - 44.90


The U.S. has dominated the men's 400 meters through the years and Otis Davis is one of the nation's all-time greats in that event. Known primarily for his prowess on the basketball court, Davis didn't take up running the 400 meters in track and field until he was 26 years old. At the 1960 Olympic Games in Rome, he won by a hair over Germany's Carl Kaufmann, setting a world record of 44.9 seconds and becoming the first man to break the heralded 45-second barrier. Two days later, Davis and Kaufmann met again for the 4x400m relay final. He held off the challenge, anchoring home the gold with another world record performance of 3:02.2. Davis was the 1961 USA Outdoor 400m champion, and he was ranked in the top ten in the world three times during his career.

Records Held
World Record: 400 m - 45.67 (August 8, 1960 - )
World Record: 400 m - 45.62 (September 5, 1960 - )
World Record: 400 m - 45.07 (September 6, 1960 - )
World Record: 1,600 yd. relay - 3:05.60 (August 8, 1960 - )
World Record: 1,600 m relay - 3:02.20 (September 8, 1960 - )

Championships
1960 USA Outdoor Championships: 400 m - 45.80 (1st)
1961 USA Outdoor Championships: 440 yd. - 46.10 (1st)

Education
undergraduate: University of Oregon (Eugene, Oregon)

Occupations
Teacher
Counselor
President of the Tri-States Olympic Alumni Association

Gerry Lindgren

Inducted: 2004, athlete

Born: March 9, 1946 - Spokane, Washington

Events
5,000 m - 13:33.80
10,000 m - 28:40.20


The first American ever to win a distance event at a U.S.-Soviet Union dual meet, Gerry Lindgren was the U.S. national champion at 3,000 meters in 1967 and the 1964 national 10,000m champion. One of the most dominant collegiate athletes in history, Lindgren won 11 of the 12 NCAA events he contested while a student at Washington State University. He placed ninth in men's 10,000 meters at 1964 Olympic Games and was the 1967 USA 3,000m champion and the 1964 USA 10,000m champion. A three-time NCAA 5,000m/ three-mile champion, Lindgren was also a three-time NCAA 10,000m/ six-mile champion, a two-time NCAA Indoor two-mile champion and a three-time NCAA cross country champion. He set the six-mile world record in 1965 and set U.S. 3,000m & 5,000m records twice each. On July 25, 1964, in the event he is best known for, Lindgren outran two seasoned Russian runners, Leonid Ivanov and Anatoly Dutov, to win the 10,000 meters at the USA-USSR Track Meet in Los Angeles.

Records Held
World Record: 6 mi. - 27:12

Championships
1964 Olympic Games: 10,000 m (9th)
1964 U.S. Olympic Trials: 10,000 m - 29:02.00 (1st)
1967 USA Outdoor Championships: 3,000 m (1st)
1967 USA Outdoor Championships: 3 mi. - 13:11 (1st)
1966 NCAA: 3 mi. - 13:34 (1st)
1966 NCAA: 6 mi. - 28:07 (1st)
1966 NCAA Cross Country: - 1741.40 m (1st)
1966 NCAA Indoor: 2 mi. - 8:41 (1st)
1967 NCAA: 3 mi. - 13:48 (1st)
1967 NCAA: 6 mi. - 28:44 (1st)
1967 NCAA Cross Country: - 1845.60 m (1st)
1967 NCAA Indoor: 2 mi. - 8:35 (1st)
1968 NCAA: 5,000 m - 13:47.20 (1st)
1968 NCAA: 6 mi. - 29:41 (1st)
1969 NCAA Cross Country: - 1739.20 m (1st)

Education
high school: Rodgers HS (Spokane, Washington), 1964
undergraduate: Washington State University (Pullman, Washington), 1970

Occupations
Coach

John Pennel

Inducted: 2004, athlete

Born: July 25, 1940 - Memphis, Tennessee
Deceased: September 26, 1993

Events
Pole Vault - 5.44 m


The first man ever to clear 17 feet in the pole vault, John Pennel is recognized as one of the greatest pole vaulters of all time. Pennel broke the 17-foot barrier using a fiberglass pole when most competitors were still using wooden poles. His world record was a clearance of 5.20m/17 feet, 0.75 inch, on August 24, 1963 in Miami, Florida. Pennel was later passed by both Fred Hansen and Bob Seagren before he reclaimed the world record in 1968 with a clearance of 5.44m/17-10.25, a standard that lasted until 1973. A two-time Olympic pole vault finalist (1964, 1968), Pennel was the favorite in 1964, but pain from a slipped disc caused him to finish 11th. The 1965 USA pole vault champion, Pennel held the world and U.S. outdoor pole vault record on numerous occasions, and was a two-time world and U.S. indoor record holder. He was world ranked seven times (#1 two times) and won the prestigious AAU Sullivan Award in 1965 as the nation's outstanding amateur athlete. He retired shortly after placing fifth at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City. Pennel died of cancer.

Records Held
World Record: Pole Vault - 4.95 m (March 23, 1963 - )
World Record: Pole Vault - 4.98 m (April 10, 1963 - )
World Record: Pole Vault - 5.05 m (April 30, 1963 - )
World Record: Pole Vault - 5.10 m (July 13, 1963 - )
World Record: Pole Vault - 5.10 m (July 26, 1963 - )
World Record: Pole Vault - 5.13 m (August 8, 1963 - )
World Record: Pole Vault - 5.20 m (August 24, 1963 - )
World Record: Pole Vault - 5.34 m (July 23, 1966 - )
World Record: Pole Vault - 5.44 m (June 21, 1969 - )

Championships
1964 Olympic Games: Pole Vault (11th)
1968 Olympic Games: Pole Vault (5th)
1968 Olympic Games: Pole Vault (5th)
1965 USA Outdoor Championships: Pole Vault - 5.18 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Northeast Louisiana (Monroe, Louisiana), 1963

Stan Huntsman

Inducted: 2004, coach

Born: March 20, 1932


In a 39-year career as a collegiate head coach, Stan Huntsman compiled 46 conference championships during his tenures at Ohio University (14 years), University of Tennessee (15 years) and the University of Texas (10 years). He coached 41 NCAA champions and four national champion relay squads, and led Tennessee to two NCAA team championships (1972 cross country, 1974 outdoors). Huntsman earned NCAA National Coach of the Year honors six times during his tenure with the Volunteers, with those honors coming in outdoor track (1974-76-83), indoor track (1981-82) and cross country (1972). Huntsman coached American record holder and Olympian Doug Brown, and NCAA champion, U.S. champion, World Cup champion, and 1992 Olympian David Patrick among others. Huntsman also enjoyed a successful international coaching career, serving as the head USA coach for the 1988 Olympic Games, 1983 World Championships and 1977 World Cup. He served as an assistant coach at the 1976 and 1980 Olympic Games.

Education
undergraduate: Wabash College (Crawfordsville, Indiana), 1954

Occupations
Track & field coach - University of Ohio (14 years)
Track & field coach - University of Tennessee (15 years)
Track & field coach - University of Texas (10 years)

Evie Dennis

Inducted: 2004, contributor

Born: September 8, 1924


During her four decades of involvement in track and field and the U.S. Olympic Committee, Dr. Evie Dennis has served in many capacities. In 1978, she ran for second vice president of the AAU, running against two men and winning on the first ballot - a rarity in a three-candidate race. She was the chair of women's track & field for the AAU in 1979, and she became overall, acting chair of track & field when men's chair LeRoy Walker resigned. In June 1980, in Dallas, she convened the constitutional convention for what was to become The Athletics Congress (later USA Track & Field), and served as TAC's acting president. She was the first female chef de mission (team leader) for the USOC, twice fulfilling the role for the Pan American Games, in Caracas, Venezuela, and Havana, Cuba. She was chef de mission for the U.S. delegation at the 1988 Olympic Games in Seoul, and she has been involved in U.S. team processing for every Olympic Team since 1976. Dr. Dennis has continued her involvement in USATF's women's track and field committee, and serves as one of USATF's delegates to the IAAF. She also is the chair of USATF's Diversity and Leadership Committee.

Occupations
Former deputy superintendent and superintendent of Denver Public Schools

Earlene Brown

Inducted: 2005, athlete

Born: July 11, 1935

Events
Shot Put - 16.69 m
Discus Throw - 53.90 m


In winning the bronze medal at the 1960 Olympic Games in Rome, Brown remains the only American woman ever to win an Olympic medal in the shot put. She also placed sixth at the 1960 Olympics in the discus throw. She began her track and field career in 1956 and won the AAU shot put championship that same year with a then U. S. record of 13.72 meters/45 feet. At the Olympic Trials that year she extended her record to14.26m/46-9.50. Although she finished sixth in the shot and fourth in the discus at the 1956 Olympics, Brown set American records in both events. In 1958, she became the first American woman to break the 50-foot barrier in the shot, and ended the season ranked #1 in the world by Track & Field News. Brown won the AAU outdoor shot put championship eight times, from 1956 through 1962 and in 1964. She demonstrated her versatility in winning U.S. titles in the discus in 1958, 1959, and 1961. She also won the baseball throw (since dropped from the program) in 1958, and was the gold medalist in both the shot and the discus at the 1959 Pan-American Games. After placing twelfth in the shot at the 1964 Olympics, Brown retired from track and field competition. She later became a star in the Roller Derby. Brown died in 1983.

Records Held
American Record: Shot Put - 13.72 m
American Record: Shot Put - 14.26 m
American Record: Shot Put - 15.12 m
American Record: Discus Throw - 51.40 m

Championships
1956 Olympic Games: Shot Put (6th)
1956 Olympic Games: Discus Throw (4th)
1960 Olympic Games: Shot Put - 16.42 m (3rd)
1964 Olympic Games: Shot Put (12th)
1956 U.S. Olympic Trials: Shot Put - 14.26 m (1st)
1956 USA Outdoor Championships: Shot Put - 13.72 m (1st)
1957 USA Outdoor Championships: Shot Put - 13.12 m (1st)
1957 USA Outdoor Championships: Baseball Throw - 82.85 m (1st)
1958 USA Indoor Championships: Shot Put - 15.09 m (1st)
1958 USA Outdoor Championships: Shot Put - 14.46 m (1st)
1958 USA Outdoor Championships: Discus Throw - 46.47 m (1st)
1959 USA Outdoor Championships: Shot Put - 14.14 m (1st)
1959 USA Outdoor Championships: Discus Throw - 46.85 m (1st)
1960 USA Olympic Trials: Shot Put - 15.50 m (1st)
1960 USA Outdoor Championships: Shot Put - 15.15 m (1st)
1961 USA Outdoor Championships: Shot Put - 14.54 m (1st)
1964 U.S. Olympic Trials: Shot Put - 14.98 m (1st)
1964 USA Outdoor Championships: Shot Put - 14.30 m (1st)
1959 Pan-American Games: Shot Put (1st)
1959 Pan-American Games: Discus Throw (1st)

Education
junior college: Compton Junior College

Occupations
Beautician…star in roller derby

Jim Fuchs

Inducted: 2005, athlete

Born: December 6, 1927


Fuchs enjoyed a period of domination in the men's shot put from 1949-1950 that will be long remembered. Through that remarkable span of time he won 88 consecutive meets and set four world records, and Track & Field News ranked him #1 in the world each of those seasons. Along with his world records, other highlights of his career included Olympic bronze medals in 1948 in London and 1952 in Helsinki. As a collegiate star competing for Yale, Fuchs won both the IC4A and NCAA championships in 1949 and 1950. He won U.S. national outdoor titles those same years, and was the AAU indoor champion three years in a row from 1950 through 1952. The 1951 Pan American Games shot put and discus champion in 1951, Fuchs went on his world record shot put spree beginning in 1949. His first world record was 17.79m/58 feet, 4.50 inches in June of 1949 at Oslo, Norway, and he extended it to 17.82m/58-5.50 on April 29, 1950 at Los Angeles. Fuchs improved the world record to 17.90m/58-8.75 on August 20, 1950, at Visby, Sweden; and increased it to 17.95m/58-10.75 two days later at Eskilstuna, Sweden. Fuchs currently resides in New York City.

Records Held
World Record: Shot Put - 17.79 m (July 28, 1949 - )
World Record: Shot Put - 17.82 m (April 29, 1950 - )
World Record: Shot Put - 17.90 m (August 20, 1950 - )
World Record: Shot Put - 17.95 m (August 22, 1950 - )

Championships
1948 Olympic Games: Shot Put - 16.42 m (3rd)
1952 Olympic Games: Shot Put - 17.06 m (3rd)
1949 USA Outdoor Championships: Shot Put - 17.43 m (1st)
1950 Outdoor Championships: Shot Put - 17.43 m (1st)
1950 USA Indoor Championships: Shot Put - 17.16 m (1st)
1950 USA Outdoor Championships: Shot Put - 17.07 m (1st)
1951 USA Indoor Championships: Shot Put - 17.67 m (1st)
1952 USA Indoor Championships: Shot Put - 17.15 m (1st)
1951 Pan American Games: Shot Put - 17.25 m (1st)
1951 Pan American Games: Discus - 48.90 m (1st)
1949 IC4A Championships: Shot Put (1st)
1949 NCAA Outdoor Championships: Shot Put - 17.10 m (1st)
1950 IC4A Championships: Shot Put (1st)
1950 NCAA Outdoor Championships: Shot Put (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Yale University (New Haven, Connecticut)

Occupations
Business Executive (Broadcasting, publishing, out-placement business)

Roger Kingdom

Inducted: 2005, athlete

Born: August 26, 1962


The winner of two Olympic gold medals in the 110 meter hurdles, one in 1984 and another in 1988, where Kingdom routed the field in Seoul with his then Olympic record winning time of 12.98 seconds. On August 16, 1989 he broke fellow National Track and Field Hall of Famer Renaldo Nehemiah's nearly eight-year-old world record by posting a 12.92 at the Weltklasse meet in Zurich, Switzerland. Kingdom's world mark lasted four years and five days and lasted as the U.S. record until July 10, 2006. His competitive career also includes five U.S. Outdoor championships (1985, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1995), two gold medals at the Pan Am Games (1983, 1995), a World Cup gold medal (1989), and a gold at the World University Games (1989). As a collegian at the University of Pittsburgh, Kingdom won the NCAA Division I Outdoor 110m hurdles title in 1983, and the NCAA Indoor 55m hurdles crown in 1984. Kingdom, who was ranked #1 in the world on five occasions (1984-1985-1988-1989-1990) is currently the head track and field coach at California University (Pennsylvania).

Records Held
World Record: 110 m hurdles - 12.92 (August 16, 1989 - )

Championships
1984 Olympic Games: 110 m hurdles - 13.20 (1st)
1988 Olympic Games: 110 m hurdles - 12.98 (1st)
1989 World Cup: 110 m hurdles - 12.87 (1st)
1989 World Indoor Championships: 60 m hurdles - 7.43 (1st)
1989 World University Games: 110 m hurdles - 13.26 (1st)
1995 World Outdoor Championships: 110 m hurdles - 13.19 (3rd)
1985 USA Outdoor Championships: 110 m hurdles - 13.37 (1st)
1988 USA Olympic Trials: 110 m hurdles - 13.21 (1st)
1988 USA Outdoor Championships: 110 m hurdles - 13.15 (1st)
1989 USA Outdoor Championships: 110 m hurdles - 13.32 (1st)
1990 USA Outdoor Championships: 110 m hurdles - 13.22 (1st)
1995 USA Outdoor Championships: 110 m hurdles - 13.09 (1st)
1983 Pan American Games: 110 m hurdles - 13.44 (1st)
1995 Pan American Games: 110 m hurdles - 13.39 (1st)
1983 NCAA Outdoor Championships: 110 m hurdles - 13.54 (1st)
1984 NCAA Indoor Championships: 55 m hurdles - 7.08 (1st)

Education
undergraduate: University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania)

Occupations
Track Coach

John McDonnell

Photo of John McDonnell

Inducted: 2005, coach

Born: July 2, 1938


John McDonnell was a soccer player growing up in Ireland when one day his brother, a track athlete, asked him to pace him one day on an 880-yard run. His brother never caught up with him, and neither will any collegiate coach. As the head coach at the University of Arkansas, McDonnell’s teams have won 41 NCAA national team titles and produced five seasons in which the Razorbacks have won the NCAA indoor and outdoor track and field national titles, and cross country crowns in the same year. His athletes have won 105 NCAA individual event championships and he has produced 161 All-Americans. Look for those numbers to increase in the coming years. Arkansas’ teams have been even more dominant at the conference level, winning 76 league championships. In the Southwest Conference, where they competed head to head with other powerful track programs like Texas, Texas A&M, TCU, Houston and Baylor, McDonnell’s Razorbacks won 38 titles – 17 in cross country, 12 in indoor track and nine in outdoor track. The Razorbacks switched to the Southeastern Conference in time for the 1991 cross country meet, and league members vowed to show their strength against the Hogs. But while Tennessee, Florida, LSU and others have been strong, the Razorbacks’ dominance continued. McDonnell’s teams sent a signal to the SEC when the Hogs took the first five places for a perfect score in their first league cross country meet. Arkansas has been nearly invincible since. The Razorbacks have won 38 of a possible 42 SEC titles since joining the league, including all 14 cross country titles. McDonnell began coaching cross country at the University of Arkansas in 1972 and he assisted head track coach Ed Renfrow with the track program. When Renfrow left coaching, Razorback Athletic Director Frank Broyles promoted McDonnell in time for the 1977-78 academic year.

Education
undergraduate: Southwestern Louisiana University (Lafayette, Louisiana)

Occupations
Track & Field Coach

Mike Powell

Inducted: 2005, athlete

Born: October 10, 1963


One of the greatest long jumpers of all time, Powell set the existing world record of 8.95 meters/29 feet, 4.50 inches at the 1991 IAAF World Outdoor Championships in Tokyo, winning an epic dual against fellow Hall of Famer Carl Lewis. Powell's dramatic victory, a world record performance that nobody has come close to since, handed Lewis his first defeat in the event in 10 years. During his heralded long jump career, Powell was a two-time world champion (1991-1993), two-time Olympic silver medalist (1988/1992) and six-time U. S. champion (1990-92-93-94-95-96). He was the world's dominant long jumper in 1993 and 1994, winning 34 competitions in a row. In 1991 he earned the AAU's James E. Sullivan Memorial Award as the nation's top amateur athlete. Powell, who was ranked #1 in the world by Track & Field News on four occasions (1990-1991-1993-1994) currently serves as an assistant track and field coach at his collegiate alma mater, UCLA.

Records Held
World Record: Long Jump - 8.95 m (August 30, 1991 - )

Championships
1988 Olympic Games: Long Jump - 8.49 m (2nd)
1992 Olympic Games: Long Jump - 8.64 m (2nd)
1996 Olympic Games: Long Jump - 8.17 m (5th)
1991 World Outdoor Championships: Long Jump - 8.95 m (1st)
1993 World Outdoor Championships: Long Jump - 8.59 m (1st)
1995 World Outdoor Championships: Long Jump - 8.28 m (1st)
1997 World University Games: Long Jump - 8.19 m (1st)
1990 USA Outdoor Championships: Long Jump - 8.24 m (1st)
1992 USA Olympic Trials: Long Jump - 8.62 m (1st)
1992 USA Outdoor Championships: Long Jump - 8.62 m (1st)
1993 USA Outdoor Championships: Long Jump - 8.53 m (1st)
1994 USA Outdoor Championships: Long Jump - 8.68 m (1st)
1995 USA Outdoor Championships: Long Jump - 8.55 m (1st)
1996 USA Olympic Trials: Long Jump - 8.39 m (1st)
1996 USA Outdoor Championships: Long Jump - 8.39 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: UCLA (Los Angeles, California)

Occupations
Track Coach

Wes Santee

Inducted: 2005, athlete

Born: March 25, 1932


A 1952 Olympian who competed in the 5,000 meters at the Games in Helsinki, Santee is most known for his prowess in the mile and 1,500 meters. One of a handful of competitors considered to be a serious threat to break the four-minute mile barrier before it happened in 1954, Santee set the world record in the 1,500 meters on June 4, 1956, when he was timed in 3 minutes, 42.8 seconds at the Compton Invitational. Santee also set the indoor mile world record twice (4:04.9-1954 & 4:03.8-1955), and the indoor 1,500m world record once in 1955 (3:48.3). Known for his versatility as a collegiate star at the University of Kansas, on April 10, 1954, Santee had an amazing three-race performance against the University of California at Berkeley, where he won the 880y in 1:51.5, the mile in 4:05.5, and ran a 440 relay leg in 48-flat. As a Jayhawk, Santee won the NCAA outdoor mile title in 1953, the NCAA 5,000m crown in 1952, and the NCAA cross country title in 1953. The national indoor mile champion in 1955, Santee captured USA Outdoor 1500m/Mile crowns in 1952, 1953y and 1955. He was world ranked by Track & Field News in the 800 meters in 1953 (#2), 1954 (#8) & 1955 (#6); and in the 1,500 meters in 1953 (#2), 1954 (#3) & 1955 (#7). Santee currently resides in Eureka, Kansas.

Records Held
World Record (indoor): 1,500 m - 3:48.30
World Record: 1,500 m - 3:42.80 (June 4, 1954 - )
World Record (indoor): 1 mi. - 4:04.00
World Record (indoor): 1 mi. - 4:03.80

Championships
1952 Olympic Games: 5,000 m - 15:10.04
1952 USA Outdoor Championships: 1,500 m - 3:49.30 (1st)
1953 USA Outdoor Championships: 1 mi. - 4:07.60 (1st)
1955 USA Indoor Championships: 1 mi. - 4:07.90 (1st)
1955 USA Outdoor Championships`: 1 mi. - 4:11.50 (1st)
1955 Pan American Games: 1,500 m - 3:53.20 (2nd)
1952 NCAA Outdoor Championships: 5,000 m (1st)
1953 NCAA Outdoor Championships: 1 mi. - 4:03.70 (1st)

Education
undergraduate: University of Kansas (Lawrence, Kansas)

Occupations
Marine Corps/Insurance business

Fred Wolcott

Inducted: 2005, athlete

Born: November 28, 1915


Although the prime of Fred Wolcott's outstanding career occurred when there was no Olympic Games because of World War II, his accomplishments stand as a testament to one of the greatest hurdlers of all-time. He broke world records four times during the late 1930s and early 1940s and was the first man to hold IAAF world records in the high and low hurdles at the same time. One of his most notable performances came in 1940 when he broke Jesse Owens' world record in the 220-yard low hurdles with a time of 22.5 seconds. The next year, he equaled the world record in the high hurdles with a time of 13.7 seconds at the AAU Championships in Philadelphia. The winner of seven National AAU Outdoor titles (110m hurdles 1938, 1940, 1941 - 220y hurdles 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941), Wolcott won the AAU Indoor 60y hurdles crown in 1942. As a collegiate star at Rice University, Wolcott won the NCAA 120y hurdles title in 1938 and 1939, and the NCAA 220y hurdles crown in 1938, 1939 and 1940. Wolcott, who won 10 Southwestern Conference gold medals as a collegian, was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1958. Wolcott died in 1972.

Records Held
World Record: 120 yd. hurdles - 13.70 (May 3, 1940 - )
World Record: 110 m hurdles - 13.70 (June 29, 1941 - )
World Record: 220 yd. hurdles - 22.90 (July 4, 1939 - )
World Record: 220 yd. hurdles - 22.30 (June 8, 1940 - )

Championships
1938 USA Outdoor Championships: 110 m hurdles - 14.30 (1st)
1938 USA Outdoor Championships: 200 m hurdles - 23.60 (1st)
1939 USA Outdoor Championships: 200 m hurdles - 22.90 (1st)
1940 USA Outdoor Championships: 110 m hurdles - 13.90 (1st)
1940 USA Outdoor Championships: 200 m hurdles - 22.60 (1st)
1941 USA Outdoor Championships: 110 m hurdles - 13.70 (1st)
1941 USA Outdoor Championships: 200 m hurdles - 22.80 (1st)
1942 USA Indoor Championships: 60 yd. hurdles (1st)
1938 NCAA Outdoor Championships: 120 yd. hurdles - 14.10 (1st)
1938 NCAA Outdoor Championships: 220 yd. hurdles (1st)
1939 NCAA Outdoor Championships: 120 yd. hurdles - 14.20 (1st)
1939 NCAA Outdoor Championships: 220 yd. hurdles (1st)
1940 NCAA Outdoor Championships: 220 yd. hurdles (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Rice University (Houston, Texas)

Lynn Jennings

Photo of Lynn Jennings

Inducted: 2006, athlete

Born: July 1, 1960 - Princeton, New Jersey

Events
5,000 m - 15:07.92
10,000 m - 31:19.89


One of the most accomplished women's long distance runners in U.S. history, Jennings was a dominant force in cross country, both in the U.S. and internationally. Jennings has won more U.S. women's cross country titles than anyone in history with nine crowns over a 12-year span from 1985 to 1996. She won three consecutive women's world cross country championship titles from 1990 to 1992. She won the silver medal in that event in 1986 and the bronze medal in 1993. A three-time Olympian, Jennings won the bronze medal in the 10,000 meters at the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona. A four-time member of U.S. World Outdoor Championship teams, Jennings medaled at two World Indoor Championships, winning 5,000m bronze in 1993 and silver in 1995. Jennings won 10 U.S. Outdoor Champion titles (3,000m-1988, 1990/5,000m-1996, plus seven 10,000m titles), and set the women's world indoor 5,000m record of 15:22.64 in 1990. Her U.S. 10,000m record of 31:19.89 set in 1992 lasted for a decade.

Records Held
World Record (indoor): 5,000 m - 15:22.64 (January 7, 1990 - )
American Record: 10,000 m - 31:19.89 (August 7, 1992 - )

Championships
1992 Olympic Games: 10,000 m - 31:19.89 (3rd)
1990 World Cross Country Championships: 6,000 m - 19:21.00 (1st)
1991 World Cross Country Championships: 6,425 m - 20:24.00 (1st)
1992 World Cross Country Championships: 6,000 m - 21:16.00 (1st)
1993 World Indoor Championships: 5,000 m - 9:03.78 (3rd)
1995 World Indoor Championships: 5,000 m - 8:55.23 (3rd)
1985 USA Cross Country Championships: (1st)
1986 USA Indoor Championships: 2 mi. - 9:28 (1st)
1987 USA Cross Country Championships: (1st)
1987 USA Outdoor Championships: 10,000 m - 32:19.95 (1st)
1988 USA Cross Country Championships: (1st)
1988 USA Outdoor Championships: 3,000 m - 8:55.42
1989 USA Cross Country Championships: (1st)
1990 USA Cross Country Championships: (1st)
1991 USA Cross Country Championships: (1st)
1991 USA Outdoor Championships: 10,000 m - 32:45.88 (1st)
1992 Olympic Trials: 10,000 m - 32:55.96 (1st)
1992 USA Cross Country Championships: (1st)
1992 USA Outdoor Championships: 10,000 m - 32:55.96 (1st)
1993 USA Cross Country Championships: (1st)
1993 USA Indoor Championships: 3,000 m - 9:00.52 (1st)
1993 USA Outdoor Championships: 10,000 m - 31:57.83 (1st)
1995 USA Indoor Championships: 3,000 m - 8:57.62 (1st)
1995 USA Outdoor Championships: 10,000 m - 31:57.29 (1st)
1996 Olympic Trials: 5,000 m - 15:28.18 (1st)
1996 USA Cross Country Championships: (1st)
1997 USA Outdoor Championships: 10,000 m - 32:26.41 (1st)
1998 USA Outdoor Championships: 10,000 m - 34:09.86 (1st)

Education
high school: The Bromfield School (Harvard, Massachusetts), 1978
undergraduate: Princeton University (Princeton, New Jersey), 1983

Dan O'Brien

Photo of Dan O'Brien

Inducted: 2006, athlete

Born: July 18, 1966

Events
Decathlon - 8891 pts.


One of the finest decathletes the world has ever known, O'Brien is tied with 1968 Olympic gold medalist and fellow Hall of Famer Bill Toomey and Tom Pappas with the most U.S. national 10-event titles ever with five. O'Brien captured his own Olympic gold medal at the 1996 Games in Atlanta with 8,824 points for his 11th consecutive decathlon win since September 1992. He avenged a no-height performance in the pole vault at the 1992 Olympic Trials - which kept him off the U.S. Olympic team - to set the then world (and existing American) record later in the year of 8,891 points in Talence, France, bettering his previous WR of 8,812 set in 1991. The world decathlon champion in 1991, 1993 & 1995, O'Brien earned the year-end world #1 ranking from Track & Field News on six occasions and finished in the top ten of T&FN's World Athlete of the Year voting four times during his career.

Records Held
World Record: Decathlon - 8891 pts. (September 5, 1992 - )

Championships
1996 Olympic Games: Decathlon - 8824 pts. (1st)
1991 World Outdoor Championships: Decathlon - 8812 pts. (1st)
1993 World Outdoor Championships: Decathlon - 8817 pts. (1st)
1995 World Outdoor Championships: Decathlon - 8695 pts. (1st)
1991 USA Outdoor Championships: Decathlon - 8844 pts. (1st)
1993 USA Outdoor Championships: Decathlon - 8331 pts. (1st)
1994 USA Outdoor Championships: Decathlon - 8707 pts. (1st)
1995 USA Outdoor Championships: Decathlon - 8682 pts. (1st)
1996 USA Outdoor Championships: Decathlon - 8726 pts. (1st)

Education
high school: Henley HS (Klamath Falls, Oregon), 1984
junior college: Spokane CC, 1988
undergraduate: Idaho, 1989

Occupations
Coach
Personal trainer
Motivational speaker

Kevin Young

Photo of Kevin Young

Inducted: 2006, athlete

Born: September 16, 1966 - Los Angeles, California

Events
400 m hurdles - 46.78


In an electrifying performance that would have won the flat 400m title as recently as the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne, Young became the first and only man in history to shatter the 47-second barrier by winning the 1992 Olympic men's 400m hurdles gold medal in the astounding world record time of 46.78 seconds. In using his unusual technique of switching between 12 and 13-stride intervals between hurdles, Young bettered the world record of 47.02 set by Edwin Moses in 1983 despite slamming the final hurdle and raising his arms in triumph prior to reaching the finish. His record still stands and he remains the only athlete ever to break the 47-second barrier. As a collegian Young was nicknamed "Spiderman" by his teammates at UCLA, where he won the 1987 and 1988 NCAA 400m hurdles crowns. After winning the 400m hurdles at the 1993 USA Outdoor Championships, later that summer Young won the gold medal at the World Outdoor Championships in Stuttgart, Germany.

Records Held
World Record: 400 m hurdles - 46.78

Championships
1992 Olympic Games: 400 m hurdles - 46.78 (1st)
1993 World Outdoor Championships: 400 m hurdles - 47.18 (1st)
1992 USA Outdoor Championships: 400 m hurdles - 47.89 (1st)
1993 USA Outdoor Championships: 400 m hurdles - 47.69 (1st)
1987 NCAA Outdoor Championships: 400 m hurdles - 48.90 (1st)
1988 NCAA Outdoor Championships: 400 m hurdles - 47.85 (1st)

Education
high school: Jordan HS (Los Angeles, California), 1984
undergraduate: UCLA (Los Angeles, California), 1988

Occupations
Involved with a fitness/performance company.
Involved with children’s books.

Ollan Cassell

Photo of Ollan Cassell

Inducted: 2006, contributor

Born: October 5, 1937


A figure who reached the highest levels of track and field as both an athlete and an official, Cassell served as the track & field administrator for the AAU from 1965-1970, and as the AAU's executive director from 1970-1980. Following the implementation of the Amateur Sports Act of 1978, Cassell managed the transition from the AAU to the new national governing body as the executive director of The Athletics Congress/USA Track & Field. He served in that capacity from 1980 thru July 1997. An IAAF Vice-President from 1984 to 1996, during his tenure as the nation's chief track and field administrator Cassell was a pioneer in creating trust funds for athletes that allowed them to accept prize money and was instrumental in bringing changes within the sport. Cassell currently is involved in real estate and is a professor of Olympic Sports history at universities in the Indianapolis area. He also serves as the president of the Indiana Olympians Association.

Rex Cawley

Photo of Rex Cawley

Inducted: 2006, athlete

Born: July 6, 1940

Events
110 m hurdles - 13.90
400 m hurdles - 49.10


As a student at USC, Cawley won the NCAA national title in the 440 yard hurdles in 1963. He set the world record of 49.1 seconds in the 400m hurdles during the 1964 Olympic Trials, becoming a favorite to medal at the Olympic Games. At the Olympics in Tokyo, he defeated his nearest competitor in the event, John Cooper of Great Britain, by 0.5 seconds to take home the gold medal. A two-time USA 400m hurdles champion (1963 & 1965), Cawley was twice world-ranked #1 in the 400-meter hurdles world-ranked by Track & Field News, and he also achieved rankings in the 400m dash and 110m hurdles. Cawley was the runner-up in the 1963 USA vs. Russia dual meet in Moscow with his time of 50.9 seconds before winning against the Russians in another dual affair in 1964 at the Los Angeles Coliseum in 49.5 seconds.

Records Held
World Record: 400 m hurdles - 49.10 (September 13, 1964 - )

Championships
1964 Olympic Games: 400 m hurdles - 49.60 (1st)
1963 USA Outdoor Championships: 400 yd. hurdles - 50.40 (1st)
1964 Olympic Trials: 400 m hurdles - 49.10 (1st)
1965 USA Outdoor Championships: 400 yd. hurdles - 50.40 (1st)
1963 NCAA Outdoor Championships: 400 yd. hurdles - 49.60 (1st)

Education
undergraduate: University of Southern California, 1963

Occupations
Worked in medical/electronics industry and later became a travel agent.

Ben Eastman

Photo of Ben Eastman

Inducted: 2006, athlete

Born: July 9, 1911 - Burlingame, Colorado
Deceased: October 6, 2002

Events
200 m - 21.40
400 yd. - 46.40
500 m - 1:02.00
600 yd. - 1:08.80
880 yd. - 1:49.80


A collegiate star at Stanford University, Eastman won the IC4A 880 yard run in 1931, and in the spring of 1932 he set three world records running 440 yards in 46.4 seconds, and the 880 in 1:51.3 and 1:50.9. In 1932, Eastman won his second IC4A half-mile crown and finished as the 400m runner-up at both the Olympic Trials and the Olympic Games in Los Angeles to former world record holder Bill Carr. In 1933, Eastman turned his attention to the 800m/880y and won that event at the AAU Nationals. That year he set world indoor records in the 500 meters (1:02.0) and the 600y dash in 1:09.2. In 1934 he lowered the world record for the 880 to 1:49.8. Eastman retired in 1934 and made a comeback two years later before permanently hanging up his spikes after placing fifth in the 800 meters at the 1936 Olympic Trials. He died October 6, 2002.

Records Held
World Record: 440 yd. - 46.40
World Record (indoor): 500 m - 1:02.00
World Record (indoor): 600 yd. - 1:09.20
World Record: 880 yd. - 1:51.30
World Record: 880 yd. - 1:50.90
World Record: 880 yd. - 1:49.80

Championships
1932 Olympic Games: 400 m - 46.40 (2nd)
1932 Olympic Trials: 400 m (2nd)
1933 AAU Nationals: 880 yd. (1st)
1934 USA Outdoor Championships: 800 m - 1:50.40 (1st)
1936 Olympic Trials: 800 m (5th)

Education
undergraduate: Stanford University (Palo Alto, California), 1933

Occupations
Worked for a diesel engine company, an equipment business and later operated his own fruit farm.

Matt McGrath

Inducted: 2006, athlete

Born: December 18, 1878 - , IE
Deceased: January 29, 1941

Events
Hammer Throw - 57.10 m


Born in Ireland and later immigrated to the United States, McGrath was included in the group of large and dominant throwers of the era knowns as the "Irish Whales." Considered world class in the hammer at 27, McGrath remarkably remained in the top ten of the world list until age 50. The winner of seven national hammer titles, McGrath also captured seven indoor weight throw crowns. McGrath won the silver medal at the 1908 Olympics in London and later dominated the competition by winning gold at the 1912 Stockholm Games, where the shortest of his six throws was 15 feet farther than anyone else's best. His longest throw of 54.74 meters/179 feet, 7 inches was an Olympic record that lasted 24 years. McGrath won Olympic silver at Paris in 1924 and held the world hammer throw world record on two occasions. Died January 29, 1941.

Records Held
World Record: Hammer Throw - 52.90 m (September 21, 1907 - )
World Record: Hammer Throw - 57.10 m (October 29, 1911 - )

Championships
1908 Olympic Games: Hammer Throw - 51.18 m (2nd)
1912 Olympic Games: Hammer Throw - 54.74 m (1st)
1920 Olympic Games: Hammer Throw - 46.66 m (5th)
1924 Olympic Games: Hammer Throw - 50.84 m (2nd)
1908 USA Outdoor Championships: Hammer Throw - 52.75 m (1st)
1910 USA Outdoor Championships: Hammer Throw - 51.30 m (1st)
1912 USA Outdoor Championships: Hammer Throw - 53.25 m (1st)
1913 USA Indoor Championships: 35-lb. Weight Throw (1st)
1916 USA Indoor Championships: 35-lb. Weight Throw (1st)
1918 USA Indoor Championships: 35-lb. Weight Throw (1st)
1918 USA Outdoor Championships: Hammer Throw - 53.00 m (1st)
1922 USA Indoor Championships: 35-lb. Weight Throw (1st)
1922 USA Outdoor Championships: Hammer Throw - 47.49 m (1st)
1923 USA Indoor Championships: 35-lb. Weight Throw (1st)
1924 USA Indoor Championships: 35-lb. Weight Throw (1st)
1925 USA Indoor Championships: 35-lb. Weight Throw (1st)
1925 USA Outdoor Championships: Hammer Throw - 52.44 m (1st)
1926 USA Outdoor Championships: Hammer Throw - 49.63 m (1st)

Occupations
New York City Policeman

Bill Nieder

Inducted: 2006, athlete

Born: August 10, 1933


As a high school star Nieder became the first prep athlete to break the 60-foot barrier with a 12-pound shot put. Coincidentally, at the University of Kansas, he was the first collegiate athlete to better the 60-foot mark with a 16-pound shot. During his career, Nieder faced the difficult task of competiting against fellow National Track & Field Hall of Famers Parry O'Brien and Dallas Long. The winner of the 1955 NCAA Outdoor title and the AAU crown in 1957, Nieder won the silver medal, finishing as the runner-up to O'Brien at the 1956 Olympic Games before winning the gold medal in 1960 in Rome with an Olympic record throw of 19.05 meters/62 feet, 6.25 inches. Nieder, who set the shot put world record on three occasions, tried boxing when his track and field career ended following the 1960 Olympics. He was knocked out in his first bout and hung up the gloves for good.

Records Held
World Record: Shot Put - 19.45 m (March 19, 1960 - )
World Record: Shot Put - 19.99 m (April 2, 1960 - )
World Record: Shot Put - 20.06 m (August 12, 1960 - )

Championships
1956 Olympic Games: Shot Put - 18.18 m (2nd)
1960 Olympic Games: Shot Put - 19.68 m (1st)
1957 USA Outdoor Championships: Shot Put - 18.75 m (1st)
1955 NCAA Outdoor Championships: Shot Put - 17.45 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: University of Kansas, 1955

Occupations
Employed by 3M and was instrumental in developing artificial athletic turf.
Sold first-ever synthetic track surface for an Olympic Games to 1968 Mexico City organizers.

Earle Meadows

Inducted: 1996, athlete

Born: June 29, 1913 - Corinth, Mississippi
Deceased: November 11, 1992

Events
Pole Vault - 4.54 m


A world record holder in the days of the bamboo pole, Earle Meadows achieved his greatest fame by winning the pole vault at the 1936 Olympic Games, but 1937 was perhaps his greatest year from a record standpoint. On May 8 at Stanford, Calif., Meadows and University of Southern California teammate Bill Sefton broke the world record when they cleared 4.48m/14 feet 8.50 inches, appropriately tying for first place. Three weeks later, they both bettered that mark with clearances of 4.55m/14-11. Since the standards couldn't be raised any higher, Meadows and his teammate lost their chance to become the first vaulters to clear 15 feet. Their performances while leading USC to three NCAA team titles earned Meadows and Sefton the nickname "Heavenly Twins." In 1935 and 1936, Meadows also shared the NCAA title with Sefton, and he tied Sefton for the 1935 AAU title. Meadows was equally as successful indoors, winning national titles in 1937, 1940 and 1941. In the latter meet, he set a world indoor best of 4.45m/14-7.

Records Held
World Record (indoor): Pole Vault - 4.45 m
World Record: Pole Vault - 4.48 m (May 8, 1937 - )
World Record: Pole Vault - 4.54 m (May 29, 1937 - )

Championships
1936 Olympic Games: Pole Vault - 4.35 m (1st)
1935 USA Outdoor Championships: - 4.23 m (1st)
1936 Olympic Trials: Pole Vault - 4.34 m (1st)
1937 USA Indoor Championships: - 4.34 m (1st)
1940 USA Indoor Championships: - 4.34 m (1st)
1941 USA Indoor Championships: - 4.38 m (1st)
1937 Pan American Games: - 4.12 m (3rd)
1935 NCAA Outdoor Championships: - 4.29 m (1st)
1936 NCAA Outdoor Championships: - 4.31 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: University of Southern California, 1936

Occupations
Worked in musical instrument business

Jane Frederick

Photo of Jane Frederick

Inducted: 2007, athlete

Born: April 7, 1952

Events
Pentathlon - 4708 pts.
Heptathlon - 6803 pts.


Considered one of the top U.S. women's combined-events athletes in history, Frederick won the U.S. combined events national title a record nine times. A two-time Olympian in the pentathlon and heptathlon, Frederick's best finish was seventh at the 1976 Games in Montreal. She competed in two World Outdoor Championships as a member of Team USA, winning the bronze medal in 1987. Frederick set the U.S. heptathlon record on five occasions and was the U.S. pentathlon record holder five times. Frederick's heptathon personal best of 6,803 points places her as the world all-time #14 best performer. Frederick was ranked top ten among world combined eventers by Track & Field News 11 times (#1 in 1985). In addition to her prowess in the heptathlon, Frederick won the U.S. outdoor 100m hurdles titles in 1975 and 1976, and the U.S. indoor hurdles crown in 1977.

Records Held
American Record: Pentathlon - 4169 pts. (June 23, 1972 - )
American Record: Pentathlon - 4284 pts. (August 4, 1972 - )
American Record: Pentathlon - 4167 pts. (September 2, 1972 - )
American Record: Pentathlon - 4391 pts. (June 8, 1974 - )
American Record: Pentathlon - 4676 pts. (June 20, 1975 - )
American Record: Pentathlon - 4442 pts. (September 20, 1975 - )
American Record: Pentathlon - 4732 pts. (March 30, 1976 - )
American Record: Pentathlon - 4622 pts. (June 21, 1976 - )
American Record: Pentathlon - 4438 pts. (April 1, 1977 - )
American Record: Pentathlon - 4306 pts. (May 30, 1977 - )
American Record: Pentathlon - 4617 pts. (August 19, 1977 - )
American Record: Pentathlon - 4651 pts. (May 27, 1978 - )
American Record: Pentathlon - 4704 pts. (June 24, 1978 - )
American Record: Pentathlon - 4708 pts. (May 26, 1979 - )
American Record: Heptathlon - 6104 pts. (April 23, 1981 - )
American Record: Heptathlon - 6291 pts. (May 23, 1981 - )
American Record: Heptathlon - 6438 pts. (May 23, 1982 - )
American Record: Heptathlon - 6491 pts. (July 17, 1982 - )
American Record: Heptathlon - 6678 pts. (July 20, 1984 - )
American Record: Heptathlon - 6803 pts. (September 15, 1984 - )

Championships
1972 Olympic Games: Pentathlon - 4167 pts. (21st)
1976 Olympic Games: Pentathlon - 4566 pts. (7th)
1973 World University Games: Pentathlon - 4087 pts. (5th)
1975 World University Games: Pentathlon - 4442 pts. (1st)
1977 World University Games: Pentathlon - 4625 pts. (2nd)
1987 World Outdoor Championships: Heptathlon - 6502 pts. (3rd)
1972 Olympic Trials: Pentathlon - 4169 pts. (1st)
1972 USA Outdoor Championships: Pentathlon - 4169 pts. (1st)
1973 USA Outdoor Championships: Pentathlon - 4281 pts. (1st)
1975 USA Outdoor Championships: Pentathlon - 4676 pts. (1st)
1975 USA Outdoor Championships: 100 m hurdles - 13.80 (1st)
1976 Olympic Trials: Pentathlon - 4622 pts. (1st)
1976 USA Outdoor Championships: Pentathlon - 4677 pts. (1st)
1976 USA Outdoor Championships: 100 m hurdles - 13.29 (1st)
1977 USA Indoor Championships: 60 m hurdles - 7.30 (1st)
1979 USA Outdoor Championships: Pentathlon - 4506 pts. (1st)
1981 USA Outdoor Championships: Heptathlon - 6011 pts. (1st)
1983 USA Outdoor Championships: Heptathlon - 6493 pts. (1st)
1985 USA Outdoor Championships: Heptathlon - 6587 pts. (1st)
1986 USA Outdoor Championships: Heptathlon - 6230 pts. (1st)

Education
undergraduate: University of Colorado

Occupations
Track coach
personal trainer

Calvin Smith

Photo of Calvin Smith

Inducted: 2007, athlete

Born: January 8, 1961

Events
100 m - 9.93
200 m - 19.99


Known for his smooth, efficient running style and his quiet demeanor, Smith was one of the finest 100m and 200m competitors in history. On July 3, 1983, he set the 100m world record of 9.93 seconds, bettering the previous record set by Jim Hines that stood for almost 15 years. Later that summer, at the inaugural World Outdoor Championships in Helsinki, Smith won gold medals in the 200 meters and the 4x100m relay, in addition to the silver medal in the 100 meters. At the 1987 World Outdoors in Rome, Smith successfully defended his world 200m title. At the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, he won the gold medal in the 4x100m relay, teaming up with Sam Graddy, Ron Brown and Carl Lewis in setting the then world record of 37.83 seconds. Also in Olympic competition, Smith won the 100m bronze medal at the 1988 Games in Seoul, Korea. The 1982 USA Outdoor 200m champ, Smith was world-ranked 10 times at 100m, and world-ranked seven times at 200 meters (#1 in 1983) by Track & Field News.

Records Held
World Record: 100 m - 9.93 (July 3, 1983 - )
World Record: 400 m relay - 37.86 (August 10, 1983 - )
World Record: 400 m relay - 37.83 (August 11, 1984 - )

Championships
1984 Olympic Games: 400 m relay - 37.83 (1st)
1988 Olympic Games: 100 m - 9.99 (3rd)
1981 World University Games: 100 m - 10.26 (2nd)
1983 World Championships: 100 m - 10.21 (2nd)
1983 World Championships: 200 m - 20.14 (1st)
1983 World Championships: 400 m relay - 37.86 (1st)
1985 World Cup: 400 m relay - 38.10 (1st)
1987 World Championships: 200 m - 20.16 (1st)
1992 World Cup: 100 m - 10.06 (2nd)
1992 World Cup: 400 m relay - 38.48 (1st)
1982 USA Outdoor Championships: 200 m - 20.47 (1st)

Education
undergraduate: University of Alabama

Occupations
Teacher
Track coach
Supervises a housing program for ex-offenders

Glenn Morris

Photo of Glenn Morris

Inducted: 2007, athlete

Born: June 18, 1912
Deceased: January 31, 1974

Events
Decathlon - 7900 pts.


Although Glenn Morris only competed in three decathlon competitions in his life, he certainly made the most of his opportunities. Following his graduation from Colorado A&M, where his greatest success came in the 400m hurdles, Morris began training in earnest for the decathlon and set the American record when he won the decathlon at the 1936 Kansas Relays with 7,576 points. He won the 1936 Olympic Trials with a world record total of 7,875 points, though the performance was never submitted for ratification. Morris easily won the gold medal at the 1936 Olympics with his world record total of 7,900 points (7,254 on today's scoring tables), which gave him a winning margin of 299 points over silver medalist Bob Clark of the U.S. The 1936 AAU Sullivan Award winner, Morris later played football for the Detroit Lions of the NFL and starred in the 1938 feature film, Tarzan's Revenge. He died of congestive heart failure on January 31, 1974.

Records Held
World Record: Decathlon - 7875 pts. (June 26, 1936 - )
World Record: Decathlon - 7900 pts. (August 7, 1936 - )
American Record: Decathlon - 7576 pts. (April 17, 1936 - )

Championships
1936 Olympic Games: Decathlon - 7900 pts. (1st)
1936 Olympic Trials: Decathlon - 7880 pts. (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Colorado A&M

Occupations
Military
Pro Football
Acting

George Woods

Photo of George Woods

Inducted: 2007, athlete

Born: February 11, 1943

Events
Shot Put - 22.02 m


Known for his competitive nature and ability to throw well on the biggest stages, George Woods was an accomplished and consistent performer throughout his career. A three-time Olympian, Woods won the silver medal in the men's shot put in 1968 and again in 1972, after winning the Olympic Trials both years. Woods, who won the USA indoor shot put title five times, set six world indoor records, with five of them coming in 1974. While at Southern Illinois University, Woods was the 1966 NCAA indoor shot put champion. More than 30 years after achieving his personal best throw of 22.02 meters/72 feet 3 inches, Woods is still the #6 indoor performer in history. He was ranked top ten on six occasions by Track & Field News, and #1 in 1972.

Records Held
World Record (indoor): Shot Put - 21.27 m (February 23, 1973 - )
World Record (indoor): Shot Put - 21.30 m (January 26, 1974 - )
World Record (indoor): Shot Put - 21.45 m (February 1, 1974 - )
World Record (indoor): Shot Put - 21.47 m (February 8, 1974 - )
World Record (indoor): Shot Put - 21.56 m (February 8, 1974 - )
World Record (indoor): Shot Put - 22.02 m (February 8, 1974 - )

Championships
1968 Olympic Games: Shot Put - 20.12 m (2nd)
1972 Olympic Games: Shot Put - 20.25 m (2nd)
1965 USA Indoor Championships: Shot Put - 19.16 m (1st)
1967 USA Indoor Championships: Shot Put - 19.49 m (1st)
1968 Olympic Trials: Shot Put - 20.73 m (1st)
1968 USA Indoor Championships: Shot Put - 20.20 m (1st)
1969 USA Indoor Championships: Shot Put - 19.49 m (1st)
1972 Olympic Trials: Shot Put - 21.37 m (1st)
1973 USA Indoor Championships: Shot Put - 21.27 m (1st)
1966 NCAA Indoor: Shot Put - 18.67 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Southern Illinois University

Occupations
Admissions Counselor & Academic Advisor at SIU

Elvin C (Ducky) Drake

Photo of Elvin C (Ducky) Drake

Inducted: 2007, coach

Born: November 2, 1903
Deceased: December 23, 1985


The head coach at UCLA from 1947-1964 (Asst. Coach 1929-1944), Drake led the Bruins to the 1956 NCAA outdoor team title. During his career, seven of his athletes won nine NCAA individual titles and 12 national AAU crowns. Named the NCAA Track & Field Coach of the Year in 1956, Drake was the coach of National Track & Field Hall of Famer Rafer Johnson, who won the gold medal in the decathlon at the 1960 Olympic Games in Rome. Johnson barely edged out Bruin teammate and fellow Drake protégé C.K Yang, who captured the silver medal in one of the most dramatic duels in Olympic history. Other Olympians coached by Drake include gold medalist Cy Young (1952), bronze medalists Craig Dixon ('48) and George Roubanis ('56), as well as George Stanich ('48), George Brown ('52), and Nagalingam Ethirveerasingham ('56). In 1973, the UCLA track stadium was named in his honor, and in 1984, he was inducted into the UCLA Athletic Hall of Fame as a charter member.

Education
undergraduate: UCLA (Los Angeles, California)

Occupations
Track Coach
Athletic Trainer

Don Bowden

Photo of Don Bowden

Inducted: 2008, athlete

Born: August 8, 1936

Events
800 yd. - 47.90
1,500 m - 3:46.50
1 mi. - 3:58.70


A 1956 Olympian at 1,500 meters, Don Bowden is best known for being the first American ever to break the 4-minute barrier in the mile. Bowden became the U.S. mile record holder when he ran 3:58.7 in Stockton, Calif., on June 1, 1957, which made him the first American to break 4:00. The 1957 NCAA Outdoor 880y champion, Bowden was world ranked #3 in the 800 meters by Track & Field News in 1957. He also ran the third leg (1:49.5) for the University of California quartet that set the 4x880y relay world record of 7:21.0 in Los Angeles on May 24, 1957.

Records Held
World Record: 3,520 m relay - 7:21.00 (May 16, 1958 - )
American Record: 1 mi. - 3:58.70 (June 1, 1957 - )

Championships
1957 NCAA Outdoor Championships: 880 yd. - 1:47.20 (1st)

Education
high school: Lincoln HS (San Jose, California), 1954
undergraduate: University of California, 1958

Occupations
Employee of Allied Chemical/ Developed the first synthetic track surface

Bill Carr

Photo of Bill Carr

Inducted: 2008, athlete

Born: October 24, 1909
Deceased: January 14, 1966

Events
400 m - 46.28


The 1932 Olympic 400m gold medalist, Bill Carr also captured gold at the 1932 Los Angeles Olympics as anchor of the 4x400m realy USA team that finished in the world record time of 3:08.2. Also in 1932, Carr set the 400m world record of 46.28, along with winning the Olympic Trials and AAU Outdoor 400m titles. The 1931 AAU Indoor national 300-yards champion, Carr won the IC4A 440y title in 1932. He ended the 1932 season ranked #1 in the world at 400 meters, and was named the men's #1 400m runner for 1925-49 by Track & Field News World Athletes of the Century. Shortly after the 1932 Olympic Games, Carr was injured in an automobile accident that ended his competitive career.

Records Held
World Record: 400 m - 46.20 (August 5, 1932 - )
World Record: 1,600 m - 3:11.80 (August 6, 1932 - )
World Record: 1,600 m relay - 3:08.20 (August 7, 1932 - )

Championships
1932 Olympic Games: 400 m - 46.28 (1st)
1932 Olympic Games: 1,600 m relay - 3:08.20 (1st)
1932 Olympic Trials: 400 m - 46.90 (1st)
1932 USA Outdoor Championships: 400 m - 46.90 (1st)

Education
undergraduate: University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)

Occupations
Insurance Executive

Jimmy Carnes

Photo of Jimmy Carnes

Inducted: 2008, coach

Born:


One of the leading figures in the formation of The Athletics Congress/USA, as USATF was known when it began operations, Jimmy Carnes was TAC's first president (1980-1984) and worked closely with executive director Ollan Cassell as the sport moved from amateur to open rules. He presided over TAC's constitutional convention in Dallas during the spring of 1980, where the organization's bylaws were finalized, and he assisted in the formation of TACTRUST, which was the first step towards open track competition. The IAAF later approved TAC's concept of TACTRUST on a global basis. Also during Carnes' presidency, the NCAA, which hadn't participated in track's governance for years due to a feud with the AAU, became a TAC member. The founder of the Florida Track Club, whose members included Hall of Fame inductees Frank Shorter and Marty Liquori, Carnes later served as the Executive Director of the United States Track Coaches Association and as a member of the Board of Trustees of the United States Sports Academy. He is a member of the United States Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association (formerly USTCA) Hall of Fame.

Johnny Gray

Photo of Johnny Gray

Inducted: 2008, athlete

Born: June 19, 1960

Events
800 m - 1:42.60


A four-time Olympian considered to be one of the finest 800m runners in U.S. history, Johnny Gray's best performance in Olympic competition was in 1992 in Barcelona, when he won the 800m bronze medal. A three-time U.S. World Outdoor Championships team member, Gray's best finish in that event was sixth in 1991. A seven-time U.S. 800m outdoor champion, Gray also won the 1986 USA Indoor 1,000y national title. He set the USA outdoor 800m record on five occasions and is the current record holder (1:42.60, 1985). Gray also set the USA 800m indoor record five different times, and set the current standard of 1:45.0 in 1992. He set the U.S. 1,000y indoor record in 1986 and was world ranked top ten 11 times. He was ranked #1 in the U.S. eight times by Track & Field News.

Records Held
American Record: 800 m - 1:43.74 (June 19, 1984 - )
American Record: 800 m - 1:43.28 (August 24, 1984 - )
American Record: 800 m - 1:43.28 (August 26, 1984 - )
American Record: 800 m - 1:42.96 (August 29, 1984 - )
American Record: 800 m - 1:42.60 (August 28, 1985 - )
American Record (indoor): 800 m - 1:45.64 (February 27, 1990 - )
American Record (indoor): 800 m - 1:45.08 (February 2, 1992 - )
American Record (indoor): 800 m - 1:44.40 (February 5, 1992 - )
American Record (indoor): 800 m - 1:45.00 (March 8, 1992 - )
American Record (indoor): 800 m - 1:45.58 (February 14, 1993 - )

Championships
1992 Olympic Games: 800 m - 1:43.97 (3rd)
1991 World Outdoor Championships: 800 m - 1:45.67 (6th)
1985 USA Outdoor Championships: 800 m - 1:44.01 (1st)
1986 USA Indoor Championships: 1,000 yd. - 2:04.52 (1st)
1986 USA Outdoor Championships: 800 m - 1:44.73 (1st)
1987 USA Outdoor Championships: 800 m - 1:45.15 (1st)
1992 USA Outdoor Championships: 800 m - 1:42.80 (1st)
1996 USA Outdoor Championships: 800 m - 1:44.00 (1st)

Education
high school: Crenshaw (Los Angeles, California), 1978
junior college: Santa Monica College

Occupations
Coach
Motivational Speaker

Bernie Wefers

Photo of Bernie Wefers

Inducted: 2008, athlete

Born: February 19, 1873
Deceased: April 18, 1957


A three-time USA 100y and 220y champion and two-time IC4A 100y champion, Bernie Wefers is considered one of the most dominant sprinters of his era. The 1896 IC4A 220y champion, Wefers tied the 100y world record three times and was a two-time 220y-straight world record holder. During his career, Wefers owned the 220y-turn world record four times, was world ranked in the 100m/100y four times, and on three occasions was ranked #1 globally. He was world ranked in 200m/200y on four occasions (three times #1), and was world ranked at 400m/440y on two occasions. He won the 100y (=WR) and 220y (WR) at the 1895 New York A.C. vs. London A.C. dual meet, and he is the only sprinter, other than Hall of Fame inductee Ralph Metcalfe, to win three consecutive national championships 100/200 doubles.

Records Held
World Record: 100 y - 9.80 (September 21, 1895 - )
World Record: 220 y - 21.60 (September 21, 1895 - )
World Record: 100 y - 9.80 (May 30, 1896 - )
World Record: 220 y - 21.20 (May 30, 1896 - )
World Record: 100 y - 9.80 (August 28, 1897 - )

Championships
1895 USA Outdoor Championships: 100 y - 10.00 (1st)
1895 USA Outdoor Championships: 220 y - 21.80 (1st)
1896 USA Outdoor Championships: 100 y - 10.20 (1st)
1896 USA Outdoor Championships: 220 y - 23.05 (1st)
1897 USA Outdoor Championships: 100 y - 9.80 (1st)
1897 USA Outdoor Championships: 220 y - 21.45 (1st)

Occupations
Coach at New York Athletic Club

Joetta Clark Diggs

Photo of Joetta Clark Diggs

Inducted: 2009, athlete

Born: August 1, 1962

Events
800 m - 1:57.84


During an amazing career that lasted nearly 25 years, Clark Diggs was recognized for being one of the greatest, and most consistent, women's 800m runners in U.S. history. A four-time Olympian ('88, '92, '96, '00), who competed in six Olympic Trials, Clark Diggs was a seven-time U.S. Indoor champion (’87, '88, '89, '90, '96, '97, '98); five-time U.S. Outdoor champion ('88, '89, '92, '93, '94); a four-time NCAA champion; and a two-time bronze medalist at the World Indoor Championships ('93, '97). She was the 1986 Olympic Festival champion, and the 1980 USA Junior Champion. She is also well known for her success at the Millrose Games at Madison Square Garden in New York, where she won seven times.

Championships
1993 World Indoors: 800 m - 1:59.86 (3rd)
1997 World Indoors: 800 m - 1:59.87 (3rd)
1987 USA Indoors: 800 m - 2:04.05 (1st)
1988 USA Indoors: 800 m - 2:03.41 (1st)
1988 USA Outdoors: 800 m - 1:59.79 (1st)
1989 USA Indoors: 800 m - 2:02.60 (1st)
1989 USA Outdoors: 800 m - 2:01.42 (1st)
1990 USA Indoors: 800 m - 2:04.32 (1st)
1992 USA Outdoors: 800 m - 1:58.47 (1st)
1993 USA Outdoors: 800 m - 2:01.47 (1st)
1994 USA Outdoors: 800 m - 2:00.41 (1st)
1996 USA Indoors: 800 m - 2:00.90 (1st)
1997 USA Indoors: 800 m - 2:00.86 (1st)
1998 USA Indoors: 800 m - 2:02.40 (1st)
1982 AIAW Indoors: 10,000 yd. - 2:37.60 (1st)
1983 NCAA Indoors: 400 yd. relay - 3:37.00 (1st)
1983 NCAA Indoors: 800 m - 2:06.02 (1st)
1983 NCAA Outdoors: 800 yd. - 2:02.28 (1st)
1984 NCAA Indoors: 800 m relay - 8:40.17 (1st)
1984 NCAA Indoors: 1,000 m - 2:43.85 (1st)
1984 NCAA Outdoors: 800 m - 2:02.60 (1st)

Education
high school: Columbia, 1980
undergraduate: Tennessee, 1984

Occupations
Author, Leads the Joetta Clark-Diggs Sports Foundation, and Motivational Speaker

Andre Phillips

Photo of Andre Phillips

Inducted: 2009, athlete

Born: September 5, 1959

Events
400 m hurdles - 47.19


In winning the gold medal in the men's 400m hurdles at the 1988 Olympic Games in Seoul, Andre Phillips picked the best possible time to notch his only career win over his idol and fellow National Track & Field Hall of Famer Edwin Moses. Phillips, who won the 1985 World Cup, the 1985 USA Outdoor title and was the 1981 NCAA 400m hurdles champion, was nine times ranked top ten in the world by Track & Field News, and ranked #1 globally in 1985, 1986 and 1988. He was world ranked #3 in the 110m hurdles in 1985.

Championships
1988 Olympic Games: 400 m hurdles - 47.19 (1st)
1985 World Cup: 400 m hurdles - 48.42 (1st)
1985 World Cup: 400 m relay - 3:00.71 (1st)
1985 USA Outdoors: 400 m hurdles - 47.67 (1st)
1981 NCAA Outdoors: 400 m hurdles - 49.12 (1st)

Education
high school: Silver Creek (San Jose, California), 1977
junior college: San Jose CC (San Jose, California), 1979
undergraduate: UCLA (San Jose, California), 1981

Occupations
Assistant Principal

Willie Steele

Photo of Willie Steele

Inducted: 2009, athlete

Born: June 14, 1932
Deceased: September 19, 1989

Events
Long Jump - 8.08 m


Recognized as the world's finest men's long jumper of the late 1940s, Willie Steele was the favorite to win at the 1948 Olympic Games. Despite a sore ankle that allowed him only two attempts, both of Steele's jumps were good enough to win the gold over the world's best. A two-time USA Outdoor champion, Steele was the 1948 Olympic Trials champion, a two-time NCAA long jump champion, was considered the world's best long jumper in 1942 and 1946, and was world ranked #1 by Track & Field

Championships
1948 Olympic Games: Long Jump - 7.82 m (1st)
1948 Olympic Trials: Long Jump - 7.98 m (1st)
1946 AAU Outdoors: Long Jump - 7.32 m (1st)
1947 AAU Outdoors: Long Jump - 7.55 m (1st)
1948 NCAA Outdoors: Long Jump - 7.60 m (1st)
1947 NCAA Outdoors: Long Jump - 8.08 m (1st)

Education
high school: Hoover (San Diego, California)
undergraduate: San Diego State University (San Diego, California)

Randy Williams

Photo of Randy Williams

Inducted: 2009, athlete

Born: August 23, 1953

Events
Long Jump - 8.33 m


The Olympic Games men's long jump gold medalist in 1972 and silver medalist in 1976, Randy Williams qualified for the 1980 Olympic Team, but did not compete because of the U.S. boycott. Williams won numerous national titles during his career including the USA Outdoor crown in 1973, he was USA Indoor champion in 1973, the NCAA Outdoor champion in 1972 and the NCAA Indoor champion in 1973. Williams was world ranked four times by Track & Field News, and was ranked #1 in the world following the 1972 season.

Championships
1972 Olympic Games: Long Jump - 8.24 m (1st)
1976 Olympic Games: Long Jump - 8.11 m (2nd)
1973 AAU Indoors: Long Jump - 8.13 m (1st)
1973 AAU Outdoors: Long Jump - 7.95 m (1st)
1972 NCAA Outdoors: Long Jump - 8.14 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: University of Southern California

Occupations
Firefighter

Ken Foreman

Photo of Ken Foreman

Inducted: 2009, coach

Born: August 29, 1922


The head coach at Seattle Pacific University from1950-1957, 1965-1978, 1985-1999, Foreman founded the Falcon Track Club in 1955 and served as the squad's coach in 1977. Foreman also founded the SportsWest T.C., which he directed 1977-1998. Foreman's Falcon TC squad captured the AAU cross country title in 1972, and he is well known for coaching National Track & Field Hall of Famer Doris Brown Heritage (5-time World Cross Country women's champion 1967-1971). Olympians he coached included Kelly Blair-LaBounty, Lorna Griffin, Pam Spencer and Sherron Walker. Foreman-coached athletes won 14 AAU titles (outdoor, indoor, cross country) by two athletes and one AIAW title. Foreman was named the U.S. women's head coach for the 1980 Olympic Games, and served as the Team USA head coach at the 1983 World Outdoor Championships. He was the U.S. World Cross Country Team coach in 1967, 1970 and 1973, served as the AAU Women's LDR Chair from 1968-1974, and was the recipient of the AAU/USATF Joseph Robichaux Women's T&F Award 1978.

Occupations
Coach

Jearl Miles Clark

Photo of Jearl Miles Clark

Inducted: 2010, athlete

Born: September 4, 1966 - Gainesville, Florida

Events
400 m - 49.40
800 m - 1:56.40


In a career recognized for its excellence as well as its longevity, Jearl Miles Clark achieved tremendous success in both the 400m and 800m. The 1993 World Outdoor champion, 1995 & 1997 World Outdoor Championships bronze medalist and 1997 World Indoor champion at 400 meters, Miles Clark was a two time Olympian in the 400m (1992 - 5th in semis & 1996 - 5th in final), and competed in the 800m at two Olympic Games (2000- 5th in semis & 2004 - 6th in final). A five-time Olympic Team member, Miles Clark is a three-time Olympic 4x400m relay medalist (1992, silver, 1996 & 2000 gold), and she also won 4x400m relay medals at six World Outdoor Championships (1991 silver – 1993 gold – 1995 gold – 1997 silver – 1999 silver – 2003 gold). A six-time World Indoor Championships competitor, who captured the 400m gold medal in 1997 and bronze medals in 1993 and 1999, Miles Clark won two 4x400m relay medals at that event (1991 bronze & 1997 silver). She won USA Outdoor 400m titles in 1993, ’95, ’97 & ‘02 and captured USA Outdoor 800m crowns in 1998, ’99, ’03 & ’04. Posted the American women’s outdoor 800m record three times including the current AR of 1:56.40 in 1999. Miles Clark won USA Indoor 400m titles in 1993, ‘95 ’97, ’98 & ‘99 and captured the USA Indoor 800m title in 2001.

Championships
1992 Olympic Games: 1,600 m relay - 3:20.92 (2nd)
1996 Olympic Games: 400 m - 49.55 (5th)
1996 Olympic Games: 1,600 m relay - 3:30.91 (1st)
2000 Olympic Games: 1,600 m relay (1st)
2004 Olympic Games: 800 m - 1:57.27 (6th)
1991 World indoor Championships: 1,600 m relay (3rd)
1991 World Indoor Championships: 400 m - 50.50 (5th)
1991 World Outdoor Championships: 400 m - 50.50 (5th)
1991 World Outdoor Championships: 1,600 m relay (2nd)
1993 World Indoor Championships: 400 m - 52.01 (5th)
1993 World Outdoor Championships: 400 m - 49.82 (1st)
1993 World Outdoor Championships: 1,600 m relay (1st)
1995 World Outdoor Championships: 400 m - 50.00 (3rd)
1997 World Indoor Championships: 400 m - 50.96 (1st)
1997 World Indoor Championships: 1,600 m relay - 3:27.66 (2nd)
1999 World Outdoor Championships: 1,600 m relay (1st)
2001 World Outdoor Championships: 1,600 m relay - 3:36.88 (4th)
2003 World Outdoor Championships: 1,600 m relay - 3:22.63 (1st)
1992 USA Indoor Championships: 400 m - 53.26 (1st)
1995 USA Indoor Championships: 400 m - 50.99 (1st)
1995 USA Outdoor Championships: 400 m - 50.90 (1st)
1997 USA Indoor Championships: 400 m - 51.31 (1st)
1997 USA Outdoor Championships: 400 m - 49.40 (1st)
1998 USA Indor Championships: 400 m - 51.11 (1st)
1998 USA Outdoor Championships: 800 m - 1:58.78 (1st)
1999 USA Indoor Championships: 400 m - 51.97 (1st)
1999 USA Outdoor Championships: 800 m - 1:59.47 (1st)
2001 USA Indoor Championships: 800 m - 2:00.96 (1st)
2002 USA Outdoor Championships: 400 m - 50.91 (1st)
2003 USA Outdoor Championships: 800 m - 1:58.84 (1st)
2004 USA Outdoor Championships: 800 m - 1:59.06 (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Alabama A&M (Huntsville, Alabama), 1984

Dyrol Burleson

Photo of Dyrol Burleson

Inducted: 2010, athlete

Born: April 27, 1940 - Cottage Grove, Oregon

Events
1,500 m - 3:38.80
1 mi. - 3:55.60


A two-time Olympic finalist in the men’s 1,500m (6th in 1960, 5th in 1964), Burleson won that event at the Olympic Trials in both those years. Burleson was a three-time NCAA champion (1,500m/Mile: 1960 1,500m, 1961 mile, 1962 mile) at the University of Oregon, who twice held the U.S. Outdoor 1,500m record (3:41.3 & 3:40.9, 1960) and the U.S. outdoor mile record (3:58.6 in 1960 & 3:57.6 in 1961). In 1965 he set the U.S. indoor 1,500m record of 3:42.8, and in 1961 he set the U.S. mile record of 4:03.8. He also held the U.S. 2-mile record when he ran 8:42.5 in 1962, and was a member of the quartet that set the 4xMile world record of 16:09 in 1962. He was ranked top ten in the world at 1,500m on seven occasions, and was ranked #1 globally in 1961. Burleson was the first runner ever to break the four-minute mile barrier at the University of Oregon’s famed Hayward Field.

Championships
1960 Olympic Games: 1,500 m - 3:40.90 (6th)
1964 Olympic Games: 1,500 m - 3:40.00 (5th)
1959 USA Outdoor Championships: 1 mi. - 3:47.50 (1st)
1960 Olympic Trials: 1,500 m - 3:46.90 (1st)
1961 USA Outdoor Championships: 1 mi. - 4:04.90
1963 USA Outdoor Championships: 1 mi. - 3:56.70 (1st)
1964 Olympic Trials: 1,500 m - 3:41.20 (1st)

Education
undergraduate: University of Oregon (Eugene, Oregon), 1962

Occupations
Linn County Parks (Ore.) Administrator

Roy Cochran

Photo of Roy Cochran

Inducted: 2010, athlete

Born: January 6, 1919 - Richton, Mississippi
Deceased: September 26, 1981

Events
400 m hurdles - 51.10


One of America’s great 400m hurdlers, Cochran is best known for winning the gold medal in that event at the 1948 Olympic Games in London by a margin of more than five meters in the Olympic record time of 51.1. The ninth of ten children, Cochran ran the third leg of the U.S. gold medal winning 4x400m relay in London. Cochran won U.S. 400m hurdles titles in 1939 and 1948, in addition to winning at the Olympic Trials that same year. Cochran posted the 440-yard hurdles world record when he ran 52.2 in 1942. He was ranked #1 in the world in the 400m hurdles in 1939 and 1948. Cochran was an All-American at Indiana University, where he won four Big Ten Conference titles.

Championships
1948 Olympic Games: 400 m hurdles - 51.10 (1st)
1939 USA Outdoor Championships: 400 m hurdles - 51.90 (1st)
1948 Olympic Trials: 400 m hurdles - 51.83 (1st)
1948 USA Outdoor Championships: 400 m hurdles - 52.30 (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Indiana University (Bloomington, Indiana)

Ralph Craig

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Inducted: 2010, athlete

Born: June 21, 1889 - Detroit, Michigan
Deceased: July 24, 1972

Events
100 m - 10.70
200 m - 21.70


Craig won the 100m (10.8) and led a U.S. medal sweep in that event at the 1912 Olympic Games. He also captured the 200m gold medal at those Games (21.7). In 1910, Craig posted the world record in the 220-yard straight with his time of 21 1/5 and equaled that time again in 1911. In 1912 he set the American records at 100m (10 4/5) and at 200m (21.7). He ended the 1910, 1911 and 1912 seasons ranked #1 in the world at 200m and was ranked first globally at 100m following the 1912 campaign. Craig returned to the U.S. Olympic Team 36 years following his 1912 glory in Stockholm as a reserve for the U.S. Yachting Team at the 1948 Games in London. Craig served as the Team USA delegation flag bearer in London.

Championships
1912 Olympic Games: 100 m - 10.80 (1st)
1912 Olympic Games: 200 m - 21.70 (2nd)

Education
undergraduate: University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, Michigan), 1911

Occupations
State of New York Insurance Administrator

James Dunaway

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Inducted: 2010, journalist

Born: August 17, 1927 - Houston, Texas


James Dunaway, although a native Texan, lived for most of his life in New York City and its New Jersey suburbs. After his graduation from Penn State, he worked for General Electric and then for a series of advertising agencies. Self-taught as a journalist, he says, “I learned how to write by working in advertising agencies; I learned how to write about track and field by reading track stories in The New York Times, the New York Herald Tribune, and the New York Sun.” His track writing career began in 1956, when he took a leave of absence from a Chicago ad agency to go to Australia and see the Olympic Games in Melbourne. To finance the trip he started a news service, “Hometown Features,” and covered the Games for five newspapers which had local athletes competing in Melbourne. In 1960, he began regularly covering meets in New York for The Times and Track & Field News, becoming Eastern Editor of T&FN in 1964. He has covered every Olympics since Melbourne, 14 in all, as well as every World Track and Field Championships but one, 52 NCAA outdoor championships, and more than 100 indoor and outdoor AAU, TAC, and USA National Championships. His articles on business and sports have appeared in The New York Times, Esquire, Sports Illustrated, Signature, The Runner, Runners' World, Track & Field News, American Track & Field, and many other magazines and newspapers, as well as CBS SportsLine.com. Author of the best-selling Sports Illustrated Book of Track & Field: Running Events, he was twice (1999-2001) and (2005-2007) elected president of the Track and Field Writers of America.

Education
undergraduate: Penn State (University Park, Pennsylvania), 1949

Occupations
Writer/Editor

Gail Devers

Photo of Gail Devers

Inducted: 2011, athlete

Born: November 19, 1966 - Seattle, Washington

Events
60 m - 6.95
60 m hurdles - 7.74
100 m - 10.82
100 m hurdles - 12.33


The career of Gail Devers was one of perseverance and dominance in women’s track and field. A career that saw her compete until the age of 40, Devers is a three-time Olympic gold medalist and 13-time World Indoor and Outdoor medalist. In 1991, near the beginning of her career, Devers was diagnosed with Graves Disease and began radiation treatment as doctors threatened to amputate her feet. Devers recovered to become one of the most dominant sprinters and hurdlers of her time. She won the 1992 Olympic gold medal in the 100m along with gold medals in the 100m and 4x100m in 1996. At the World Outdoor Championships she won three gold medals in the 100m hurdles (‘93, ‘95, ‘99) along with a gold medal in the 100m in 1993 and 4x100m in 1997. She won World Indoor Championships gold three times in the 60m (‘93, ‘97, ‘04) and one in the 60m hurdles (‘03). In 2007, at the age of 40, Devers won the 60m hurdles at the Millrose Games in 7.86 seconds, which was the fastest time in the world that year. A 10-time USA Outdoor 100m hurdles champion, she is a two-time winner of the ESPY for Women’s Track & Field Athlete of the Year.

Records Held
American Record (indoor): 60 m - 7.06 (March 9, 1997 - )
American Record: 100 m hurdles - 12.33 (July 23, 2000 - )

Championships
1992 Olympic Games: 100 m - 10.82 (1st)
1992 Olympic Games: 100 m hurdles - 12.75 (4th)
1996 Olympic Games: 100 m relay - 41.95 (1st)
1996 Olympic Games: 100 m - 10.94 (1st)
1996 Olympic Games: 100 m hurdles - 12.66 (4th)
1996 Olympic Trials: 100 m hurdles - 12.62 (1st)
2000 Olympic Trials: 100 m hurdles - 12.55 (1st)
2004 Olympic Trials: 100 m hurdles - 12.55 (1st)
1991 World Outdoor Championships: 100 m hurdles - 12.63 (2nd)
1993 World Indoor Championships: 60 m - 6.95 (1st)
1993 World Outdoor Championships: 100 m hurdles - 12.46 (1st)
1993 World Outdoor Championships: 100 m - 10.82 (1st)
1993 World Outdoor Championships: 100 m relay - 41.49 (2nd)
1995 World Outdoor Championships: 100 m hurdles - 12.68 (1st)
1997 World Indoor Championships: 60 m - 7.06 (1st)
1997 World Indoor Championships: 60 m - 7.06 (1st)
1997 World Outdoor Championships: 100 m relay - 41.47 (1st)
1997 World Outdoor Championships: 100 m relay - 41.47 (1st)
1999 World Indoor Championships: 60 m - 7.02 (2nd)
1999 World Outdoor Championships: 100 m hurdles - 12.37 (1st)
1999 World Outdoor Championships: 100 m relay - 42.30 (4th)
1999 World Outdoor Championships: 100 m - 10.95 (5th)
2001 World Outdoor Championships: 100 m hurdles - 12.54 (2nd)
2003 World Indoor Championships: 60 m hurdles - 7.81 (1st)
2003 World Outdoor Championships: 100 m - 11.11 (7th)
2004 World Indoor Championships: 60 m - 7.08 (1st)
2004 World Indoor Championships: 60 m hurdles - 7.78 (2nd)
1997 USA Indoor Championships: 60 m - 7.00 (1st)
1999 USA Indoor Championships: 60 m - 7.04 (1st)
1999 USA Outdoor Championships: 100 m hurdles - 12.54 (1st)
2001 USA Outdoor Championships: 100 m hurdles - 12.91 (1st)
2002 USA Outdoor Championships: 100 m hurdles - 12.51 (1st)
2003 USA Indoor Championships: 60 m hurdles - 7.85 (1st)
2003 USA Outdoor Championships: 100 m hurdles - 12.61 (1st)
2004 USA Indoor Championships: 60 m - 7.21 (1st)
2004 USA Indoor Championships: 60 m hurdles - 7.81 (1st)

Education
high school: Sweetwater High School (National City, California), 1984
undergraduate: UCLA (Los Angeles, California), 1989

Maurice Greene

Photo of Maurice Greene

Inducted: 2011, athlete

Born: July 23, 1974 - Kansas City, Kansas

Events
60 m - 6.39
100 m - 9.79
200 m - 19.86


Already a world champion, Maurice Greene became one of the all-time greats when he established a world 100m record of 9.79 in 1999. From that point, Greene would collect four Olympic medals (two gold) and another six World Championships Indoor and Outdoor gold medals. 1999 was a breakthrough season for Greene. He won three gold medals at the World Outdoor Championships (100m, 200m, 4x100m) and the 60m gold medal at the World Indoor Championships. The world indoor record holder at 60 meters, he traveled to Sydney for the 2000 Olympic Games and came home with gold in both the 100m and 4x100m. Perhaps his most memorable race occurred at the 2001 World Outdoor Championships when he injured his leg 60m into the final race and yet held on for the win. The injury nearly ended the brilliance of his career, but at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens Greene he added a silver medal in the 4x100m and bronze in the 100m. By career’s end, Greene ran under 10 seconds in the 100m a total of 53 times, which was more than any other sprinter in history at that time. After retirement, he was known for competing in the seventh season of Dancing with the Stars.

Records Held
World Record (indoor): 60 m - 6.39 (February 3, 1998 - )

Championships
2000 Olympic Games: 100 m relay - 37.61 (1st)
2000 Olympic Games: 100 m - 9.87 (1st)
2000 Olympic Trials: 100 m - 10.01 (1st)
2004 Olympic Games: 100 m relay - 38.08 (1st)
2004 Olympic Games: 100 m - 9.87 (3rd)
2004 Olympic Trials: 100 m - 9.91 (1st)
1997 World Outdoor Championships: 100 m - 9.87 (1st)
1999 World Indoor Championships: 60 m - 6.42 (1st)
1999 World Outdoor Championships: 100 m relay - 37.59 (1st)
1999 World Outdoor Championships: 100 m - 9.82 (1st)
1999 World Outdoor Championships: 200 m - 19.90 (1st)
2001 World Outdoor Championships: 100 m - 9.82 (1st)
1997 USA Outdoor Championships: 100 m - 9.90 (1st)
1999 USA Outdoor Championships: 200 m - 19.93 (1st)
2001 USA Indoor Championships: 60 m - 6.51 (1st)
2002 USA Outdoor Championships: 100 m - 9.88 (1st)

Education
high school: F.L. Schlangle High School (Kansas City, Kansas)
undergraduate: Park College (Parkville, Missouri)
undergraduate: Kansas City Community College (Kansas City, Kansas)

Craig Virgin

Photo of Craig Virgin

Inducted: 2011, athlete

Born: August 2, 1955 - Belleville, Illinois

Events
5,000 m - 13:19.10
10,000 m - 27:29.16
marathon - 2:10:26


In the late 1970s and early 1980s Craig Virgin established himself as one of the best distance runners in the world. His most impressive accomplishment was becoming the only American to win an individual World Cross Country championship, which he did twice (‘80, ‘81). The 1976 NCAA Cross Country champion, Virgin set seven U.S. national records on the roads and in track events. Virgin broke Steve Prefontaine’s national high school two-mile record before attending the University of Illinois. At Illinois, he won nine Big Ten Conference championships and eventually became the only American to qualify three times for the Olympic Games in the 10,000m (‘76, ‘80, ‘84). A three-time USA Outdoor champion (‘78, ‘79, ‘81) and 1980 Olympic Trials champion, Virgin broke Prefontaine’s American 10,000m record at 27:39.4 in 1979, which was also the second-fastest time ever run in the world at that time. Virgin is also a member of the National Distance Running Hall of Fame and the St. Louis Sports Hall of Fame.

Championships
1990 Olympic Trials: 10,000 m - 27:35.61 (1st)
1980 World Cross Country Championships: - 2101.00 m (1st)
1981 World Cross Country Championships: - 2105.00 m (1st)
1978 USA Outdoor Championships: 10,000 m - 28:15.00 (1st)
1979 USA Outdoor Championships: 10,000 m - 27:39.40 (1st)
1982 USA Outdoor Championships: 10,000 m - 28:33.02 (1st)

Education
high school: Lebanon High School (Lebanon, Illinois), 1973
undergraduate: University of Illinois (Champaign and Urbana, Illinois), 1977

Clarence DeMar

Photo of Clarence DeMar

Inducted: 2011, athlete

Born: June 7, 1888 - Madeira, Ohio
Deceased: June 11, 1958


Until the day he died, Clarence Demar never quit running or quit fighting. In 1910, he was advised by doctors to give up running because of a heart murmur. That was one year before Demar won his first of a record seven Boston Marathons, a record that still stands today. He competed in a total of 33 Boston Marathons with his final one coming at the age of 65. His first Boston Marathon victory came in 1911 and his final win was in 1930. An athlete far ahead of his time, Demar was known for weekly running from Keene, N.H., to Boston and back, which was a total of 90 miles. For the past 33 years, Keene has hosted the Clarence Demar Marathon. In addition to his feats in Boston, Demar was the bronze medalist in the marathon at the 1924 Olympic Games. He also qualified for the 1912 Olympic Games. He was inducted into the National Distance Running Hall of Fame in 2000.

Championships
1924 Olympic Games: Marathon: - 10094.00 m (3rd)

Education
undergraduate: Harvard University (Boston, Massachusetts), 1915
graduate: Boston University (Boston, Massachusetts), 1934

Vince Matthews

Photo of Vince Matthews

Inducted: 2011, athlete

Born: December 16, 1947 - Queens, New York

Events
400 m - 44.40
400 m relay - 2:56.16


One of the more prominent long sprinters of his generation, Vince Matthews won a pair of Olympic gold medals in his career. Developing a fierce competition with Lee Evans in the 400m, Matthews was a member of the 1968 gold medal 4x400m relay, which established a world record of 2:56.16. It was a record that would stand for 24 years. Matthews was at his best in 1968. At a warm-up meet prior to the Olympic Trials, he broke the world record in the 400m by running 44.4, but the time was not allowed due to his use of brush spikes. However, it was his performance during and following his gold medal run in the 400m at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich that most people remember. Following his gold medal race, in a continuation of the civil rights protests of John Carlos and Tommie Smith from 1968, Matthews and teammate Wayne Collett, who had won silver, paid little attention to the American flag and were visiting with one another during the playing of the national anthem at the medal ceremony. For their actions, both athletes were banned from Olympic competition by the IOC and therefore unable to defend their gold medal in the 4x400m. Matthews attended Johnson C. Smith University.

Championships
1968 Olympic Games: 400 m relay - 2:56.16 (1st)
1972 Olympic Games: 400 m - 44.66 (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Johnson C. Smith University (Charlotte, North Carolina)

Bob Timmons

Photo of Bob Timmons

Inducted: 2011, coach

Born: June 20, 1924 - Joplin, Missouri


Few people influenced more athletes than Bob Timmons. When his Hall of Fame career finally came to an end, Timmons had coached seven Olympians, 16 world record holders, 77 NCAA All-Americans and 24 NCAA champions. One of his more famous protégés included Jim Ryun, who he coached at Wichita East High School and at the University of Kansas. Under Timmons’ tutelage, Ryun, in his junior season, became the first high school runner ever to break four-minutes in the mile. Timmons then left for the track and field program at his alma mater of Kansas where his career spanned 22 seasons and included four NCAA championships, 13 Big 8 indoor conference titles, 14 outdoor conference titles and four cross country conference titles. At the high school level, Timmons won 17 state titles in swimming, cross country and track and field. Always expecting the most from his athletes, Timmons is also a member of the University of Kansas Hall of Fame, the Drake Relays Hall of Fame, the Kansas Sports Hall of Fame, the Kansas High School Activities Hall of Fame and the USTFCCCA Hall of Fame.

Occupations
Coach

Charles Austin

Photo of Charles Austin

Inducted: 2012, athlete

Born: December 19, 1967 - Van Vleck, Texas

Events
High Jump - 2.40 m


Charles Austin’s career began as a high school athlete who fell short of qualifying for the Texas high school state championships. It finished with an Olympic gold medal, world championship and American record. Austin became as dominant as a high jumper can be in the latter part of the 1990s by winning six consecutive USA Outdoor championships from 1995-2000. But his proudest moment came when he won the gold medal at the 1996 Olympic Games, the last time a member of Team USA has done so. His career was also one of longevity. When he won his last USA Indoor championship in 2003, it was 12 years after his first world title and the year he set the American record (2.40m/7-10.5). Austin’s career also included World Indoor gold, a World Cup title, an Olympic record and a total of nine combined USA Indoor and Outdoor titles.

Records Held
American Record: - 2.40 m (August 7, 1991 - )

Championships
1992 Olympic Games: High Jump - 2.28 m (8th)
1996 Olympic Games: High Jump - 2.39 m (1st)
1991 World Outdoor Championships: High Jump - 2.38 m (1st)
1993 World Indoor Championships: High Jump - 2.24 m (9th)
1997 World Indoor Championships: High Jump - 2.35 m (1st)
1998 World Athletics Final: High Jump - 2.28 m (3rd)
1999 World Indoor Championships: High Jump - 2.33 m (3rd)
1999 World Outdoor Championships: High Jump - 2.29 m (8th)
2001 World Indoor Championships: High Jump - 2.20 m (11th)
2001 World Outdoor Championships: High Jump - 2.20 m (10th)
2003 World Indoor Championships: High Jump - 2.20 m (10th)
1996 USA Indoor Championships: High Jump - 2.37 m (1st)
1996 USA Outdoor Championships: High Jump - 2.30 m (1st)
1997 USA Indoor Championships: High Jump - 2.31 m (1st)
1997 USA Outdoor Championships: High Jump - 2.31 m (1st)
1998 USA Outdoor Championships: High Jump - 2.30 m (1st)
1999 USA Outdoor Championships: High Jump - 2.28 m (1st)
2000 USA Outdoor Championships: High Jump - 2.32 m (1st)
2003 USA Indoor Championships: High Jump - 2.31 m (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Southwest Texas State (San Marcos, Texas), 1990

Occupations
Owner - So High Inc.

Kim Batten

Photo of Kim Batten

Inducted: 2012, athlete

Born: March 29, 1969 - McRae, Georgia

Events
400 m hurdles - 52.61


During her time at Florida State University, Kim Batten needed to make a choice of which event she would focus on as a professional. She chose the grueling 400-meter hurdles. It proved to be a wise choice as she set a world record while becoming the 1995 World Outdoor champion. Her time of 52.61 remains the fourth-fastest time ever run. A two-time Olympian and the 1996 Olympic silver medalist, Batten won six USA Outdoor titles between 1991 and 1998. She burst on the scene in 1991 when she upset Sandra Farmer-Patrick to win the USA Outdoor title while just 22 years old. Batten is also a member of the Florida State University Hall of Fame where she was a nine-time All-American and earned the 1996 ESPY award as Women’s Track and Field Performer of the Year.

Records Held
World Record: 400 m hurdles - 52.61 (August 11, 1995 - August 8, 2003)
American Record: 400 m hurdles - 52.61 (August 11, 1995 - September 1, 2011)

Championships
1992 Olympic Games: 400 m hurdles - 53.08 (2nd)
1991 World Outdoor Championships: 400 m hurdles - 53.98 (5th)
1993 World Indoor Championships: 400 m - 52.70 (6th)
1993 World Outdoor Championships: 400 m hurdles - 53.84 (4th)
1995 World Athletics Final: 400 m hurdles - 53.49 (1st)
1995 World Outdoor Championships: 400 m hurdles - 52.61 (1st)
1997 World Athletics Final: 400 m hurdles - 53.45 (1st)
1997 World Outdoor Championships: 400 m hurdles - 53.52 (3rd)
1997 World Outdoor Championships: 400 m relay - 3:21.02 (2nd)
1998 World Cup: 400 m hurdles - 53.17 (3rd)
1996 USA Outdoor Championships: 400 m hurdles - 53.81 (1st)
1997 USA Outdoor Championships: 400 m hurdles - 52.97 (1st)
1998 USA Outdoor Championships: 400 m hurdles - 53.61 (1st)

Education
undergraduate: Florida State University (Tallahassee, Florida), 1991

Occupations
Corporate Fitness

Arthur Duffey

Photo of Arthur Duffey

Inducted: 2012, athlete

Born: March 14, 1879 - Roxbury, Massachusetts
Deceased: January 25, 1955

Events
100 yd. - 9.60


For half a decade at the end of the 1800s and early 1900s, Arthur Duffey was considered the fastest man in the world. In 1902 he became the first person to set the world record in the 100-yard dash at 9.6 seconds (9 3/5 second at the time). He was the favorite to win the 1900 Olympic Games in the 100 meters, but did not finish in the final due to a pulled muscle. His greatest accomplishment was winning four consecutive AAA titles in England from 1900 through 1903. He also won the IC4A 100-yard title each year from 1901 through 1903 while competing for Georgetown University. Duffey ran into controversy with AAU President James Sullivan over his amateur status and Duffey’s AAU records and IC4A titles were erased. The British AAA, notoriously more strict about amateurism than the AAU, chose not to delete Duffey’s name from their list of champions. Following his competitive career, Duffey spent much of the rest of his life as a sports writer with the Boston Post. *Records and championships were disallowed over controversial dispute with AAU President James Sullivan

Records Held
World Record: 100 yd. - 9.60

Championships
1900 AAA: 100 yd.
1901 AAA: 100 yd.
1901 IC4A: 100 yd.
1902 AAA: 100 yd.
1902 IC4A: 100 yd.
1903 AAA: 100 yd.
1903 IC4A: 100 yd.

Education
undergraduate: Georgetown University (Washington, DC), 1903

Occupations
Sports Journalist (Boston Post)

Pat McDonald

Photo of Pat McDonald

Inducted: 2012, athlete

Born: July 26, 1878
Deceased: May 16, 1954

Events
Shot Put - 15.34 m


Pat McDonald is recognized as the oldest Olympic champion in history, winning the 56-pound weight throw at the 1920 Games at the age of 42. However, his career was far from over as he won the last of his incredible 16 AAU titles in the weight throw in 1933 at the age of 55. McDonald also won the 1912 Olympic gold medal in the shot put and a silver medal in the men’s two-handed shot put. The latter event, which featured recording the total distance a person threw the shot put with each arm, was only contested in 1912. Born in Ireland, McDonald moved to New York City where he competed for the Irish-American A.C. and the New York A.C. and worked for the New York Police Department, spending much of his time patrolling Times Square.

Championships
1912 Olympic Games: Shot Put - 15.34 m (1st)
1912 Olympic Games: Two-hand Shot Put - 27.53 m (2nd)
1920 Olympic Games: Shot Put - 14.08 m (4th)
1920 Olympic Games: 56-pound Weight Throw - 11.26 m (1st)

Occupations
Police officer inside New York City's Times Square

Fred Schmertz

Photo of Fred Schmertz

Inducted: 2012, contributor

Born: November 10, 1888 - New York, New York
Deceased: March 25, 1976


There has never been a running of the iconic Millrose Games, which first started in 1908 and will be held for the 106th time in 2013, that either Fred or Howard Schmertz has not been involved with on some level. Fred was one of the founding members of the meet before taking over as meet director in 1934, serving through 1974. At that point, his son, Howard, a New York City lawyer, took over the position until 2003, when he was appointed meet director emeritus. During their run, the Millrose Games have come to be the most enduring indoor international track meet in the world. Both Howard and Fred are also members of the Millrose Games Hall of Fame and Howard a member of the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame.

Occupations
Meet Director

Howard Schmertz

Photo of Howard Schmertz

Inducted: 2012, contributor

Born: June 9, 1925 - New York, New York


There has never been a running of the iconic Millrose Games, which first started in 1908 and will be held for the 106th time in 2013, that either Fred or Howard Schmertz has not been involved with on some level. Fred was one of the founding members of the meet before taking over as meet director in 1934, serving through 1974. At that point, his son, Howard, a New York City lawyer, took over the position until 2003, when he was appointed meet director emeritus. During their run, the Millrose Games have come to be the most enduring indoor international track meet in the world. Both Howard and Fred are also members of the Millrose Games Hall of Fame and Howard a member of the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame.

Occupations
Meet Director

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