News & Notes, Volume 9, Number 47

09-10-2009

Contact:
Tom Surber
Media Information Manager
USA Track & Field
317-713-4690

A talented group of U.S. stars won 13 of the 20 individual events and easily captured the team competition Wednesday night at the 2009 DecaNation at Charletey Stadium in Paris, France.

Created in 2005 and hosted by the French Athletics Federation, DecaNation is a team competition between nations from around the world where event specialists compete in 20 different competitions. The winner of each individual event earns nine points for his or her team, with seven points for second place, six for third and so on. Besides the U.S., competing nations this year were France, Germany, Spain, Italy, Finland and Russia.

Team USA won the event for the second consecutive year in totaling 136 points. Germany was the runner-up nation with 105 points, followed by France (3rd-91 points), Russia (4th-83 points), Italy (5th-59 points) Spain (6th-54 points) and Finland (7th-51 points).

U.S. men's winners in Paris included reigning national 100m champion Michael Rodgers, who won his specialty in 10.10 seconds. Two-time Olympic 400m hurdles gold medalist Angelo Taylor won the 400 meters in 45.68 seconds, and two-time USA Outdoor 800m champion Nick Symmonds captured the two lap event in 1 minute 48.68 seconds.

2009 USA Outdoor Championships fifth-place finisher Will Leer won the 1,500 meters in 3:48.65, 2005 World Outdoor Championships finalist Joel Brown won the 110m hurdles in 13.35 seconds and 2009 World Outdoor Championships team member Dan Huling won the 3,000m steeplechase in 8:47.14.

In field event action, 2008 Olympic Games fourth-place finisher Derek Miles won the men's pole vault with a clearance of 5.70 meters/18 feet 8.25 inches, and reigning USA Indoor champion Dan Taylor captured the men's shot put with a best toss of 20.68m/67 feet 10.25 inches.

Team USA women's winners included 2008 Olympic Games heptathlon silver medalist Hyleas Fountain, who won the long jump with a leap of 6.80 meters/19 feet 11.50 inches.

On the track, 2008 Olympic Trials finalist Monica Hargrove won the 400 meters in 51.59 seconds, and 2009 World Outdoor Championships team member Maggie Vessey won the 800 meters in 2 minutes 2.73 seconds. 2009 USA Outdoor Champs fourth-place finisher Erin Donohue won the 1,500m in 4:10.62, and 2008 Olympic Games fourth-place finisher Damu Cherry won the 100m hurdles in 12.85 seconds.

For more information on the 2009 DecaNation, including the complete results, visit: http://www.athle.com/asp.net/main.html/html.aspx?htmlid=3314

Bud Greenspan's Beijing 2008 film to appear on SHOWTIME

SHOWTIME will present a rare opportunity to relive one of the most dramatic and memorable Olympics in recent history in the original documentary BUD GREENSPAN PRESENTS: BEIJING 2008 - AMERICA'S OLYMPIC GLORY. The film will air Monday, October 19 at 7:p.m. EST and PST.

With behind-the-scenes footage and a poignant narrative, this film presents Greenspan's signature brand of powerful storytelling set in Beijing, China - a land with a storied past and a vibrant future.

One of the featured aspects of the film is the emotional story of Team USA women's hurdlers Dawn Harper and Lolo and their journeys to the same starting line in Beijing and the differing but inspiring results they each achieved in the race they had spent a lifetime preparing for.

The film marks the 12th in a series of Olympic Games films by Greenspan and Cappy Productions, Inc. His previous Olympic documentaries beginning with 1984 Summer games in Los Angeles, have chronicled every Olympics (except for 1992 Albertville) through the 2006 Torino Winter Games.

The 83-year old Greenspan has been called the foremost writer/producer/director of sports films and one of the world's leading sports historians. His numerous awards include seven Emmys®, the George Foster Peabody Award for Lifetime Achievement, the Directors Guild of America Life Time Achievement Award, the International Fair Play Award and the coveted "Olympic Order" by International Olympic Committee President Juan Antonio Samaranch for his contribution to furthering the Olympic movement. In 2004, Greenspan was inducted into the United States Olympic Committee Hall of Fame for his body of work and his humanistic approach to filming the Olympic Games.